Ninna Gaensler-Debs | KALW

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

Reporter & Editor

Ninna Gaensler-Debs is a reporter and editor for Crosscurrents. Since 2012, Ninna has worn a variety of hats at KALW - she was both a producer and event planner for Localore project Hear Here. Ninna also programmed and organized the Sights and Sounds live events - two in Bayview, and most recently, one in East Oakland. 

Ninna also founded and directed The Litography Project, a multimedia project documenting literary history and culture in the Bay Area. She's reported for 99% Invisible, Matter, KQED, and worked on immersive audio tours for Detour

Keith Allison / Wikimedia Commons

 

If things go the way Bay Area sports fans hope, by the time voters head to the ballot box on June 5, the Warriors may be in the middle of the NBA finals at Oracle Arena in Oakland.

But if the Warriors make the finals next June, they’ll be playing in San Francisco, in their brand-new stadium in Mission Bay.

Proposition I wants to discourage moves like this one. If it passes, San Francisco would have a quote “official policy” discouraging owners of professional sports teams from relocating to the city.

Quintin Gellar / Pexels

San Francisco’s Proposition D is one of several on the ballot about taxes.

The proposed law would increase taxes on San Francisco’s commercial landlords by 1.7 percent in order to fund more housing and homelessness services.

Not all commercial landlords would see increased taxes — about 20 percent would be exempt, including organizations like non-profits, and entertainment spaces like theaters or sports arenas.  

But the rent increase for the remaining commercial landlords would generate an estimated $70 million.

Ninna Gaensler-Debbs / KALW News

 

A leaked document from the Department of Homeland Security proposes to make it more difficult for immigrants who use public services to remain in the United States.

The U.S. Census Bureau conducts a new count every decade — and the next one is coming up in 2020. Last month the bureau released the questions they intend to use … and one new question has caused vigorous debate and multiple lawsuits.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

 

When migrants are deported, or return to Mexico City by choice, their job opportunities can be limited, and social stigma can make them feel isolated. Hola Code aims to change all that — through coding.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

After the destruction of the North Bay Fires, most Sonoma County residents could get financial assistance to help rebuild. But for the more than 40,000 undocumented immigrants living there, access to financial support has been limited.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

 

Update: As of January 2018, the Trump administration has ended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for both Haiti and El Salvador. That means over 250,000 TPS holders will have to return to their home countries.

More than 55,000 immigrants are living in California with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) — a form of humanitarian relief for those whose home countries have had some kind of catastrophe. Now, they’re at risk of losing their legal status.

Here's the sound we played as a clue. We asked you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

Pamela Voyles lost everything in the Valley Fire in Lake County, then spent two years homeless. She finally found a place — only to flee seven months later.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

 

Hear from two of the approximately 4000 incarcerated men and women currently deployed fighting California’s wildfires.

Since fires broke out across Sonoma County, KZST 100.1FM in Santa Rosa has transformed it into an essential news source, broadcasting information about the wildfires, live, 24/7.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs / KALW News

Wildfires tearing through California wine country flared up again today. They’ve destroyed hundreds more homes and other buildings and led to new evacuation orders in Calistoga, Green Valley and the northern part of the town of Sonoma.

Aperture Fashion Show

 

Bay Area comic Dhaya Lakshminarayanan has shared the stage with the likes of Marc Maron and Janeane Garofalo, and she’s a regular contributor to the popular radio show Snap Judgment. But she didn’t start out as a comedian.

Courtesy of the Center For Asian American Media

Thao Nguyen is known for her music, and for the band she's led for the past 10 years — Thao and the Get Down Stay Down.

David Wilson

 

When it came time to choose a musical to put on this summer, the team at San Francisco’s Theatre Rhinoceros knew they wanted to pull out all the stops for their 40th anniversary. And that’s how this queer theatrical institution decided on Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.

 

John O'Donnell

Saxophonist Francis Wong grew up in South San Francisco, but he’s made his mark in music far beyond his small hometown. The late jazz critic Phil Elwood called him one of "the greatest saxophonists of his generation."

If you listen to KALW before Crosscurrents, chances are you’ve heard our next interviewee co-hosting All Things Considered. Kelly McEvers has had a well-traveled career in journalism — she’s reported stories from Beirut to Baghdad, and won multiple awards for her coverage of the Syrian conflict.

Here's the sound we played as a clue. We asked you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Sam Spade is the private eye in The Maltese Falcon, the San Francisco detective novel that’s been mystifying readers for almost a century.

Courtesty of Caroline Paul /resized and cropped

According to a recent study, parents are four times more likely to tell girls to be careful than boys. 

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Kingsley Amis's Lucky Jim from Katherine Ellison, a writer living in San Anselmo. 

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of San Francisco’s literary scene. Find more Litography stories here

Alyssa Kapnik Portraiture

 

 


 All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Writer Kevin Smokler shared his pick - The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

Join KALW at the Joseph Lee Recreation Center on Friday, June 19 at 7 p.m. for an evening of storytelling, live music, and dance.

The second Sights and Sounds of Bayview will be hosted by Crosscurrents’ Hana Baba. The event will feature stories about the remarkable people who live, work, and make a positive impact in the neighborhood. Sights and Sounds of Bayview is part of 3rd on Third, presented by the Bayview Opera House. The event is made possible by the San Francisco Arts Commission and the San Francisco Public Utilities Company and sponsored by Independent Arts and Media. 

RSVP on our Facebook event page here!

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Writer Cara Black shared her pick - The Lover, by Marguerite Duras - with Ninna Gaensler-Debs.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

For The Book Report we ask Bay Area authors to tell us about a book that’s meaningful for them. Today we hear from San Francisco writer Maggie Tokuda-Hall.

You'll be completely absorbed in this incredibly atmospheric book. Plus there's murder and kissing. So it's got all the good stuff.

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

Note: This piece loses much of its music in written form. Click the audio player above to get the full effect. 

Roland Feller is responsible for the well-being of many of the city's stringed instruments. When you imagine him working on a violin, picture him seated at a tiny old fashioned desk littered with tools and wood shavings, in a room piled with sheet music, billing forms...and violins. Violins hanging on the walls and from the ceiling; violins leaning against the table legs on the floor.

 

Imagine a tower more than 40 stories high, sparkling as the sun catches a hundred thousand pieces of colorful cut glass. Imagine this tower at night, lit by dozens of spotlights as its gown of glass shimmies in the wind for a gaping audience beneath -- an audience that was only just starting to have access to electricity. Imagine the promise this vision held, the way it pointed your city towards the future.

San Francisco’s merchant and civic leaders poured their hearts into the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition, or PPIE. This world’s fair was ostensibly celebrating the recent completion of the Panama Canal -- but really, this was the city’s chance to show the world that it was back.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Barbara Comyns's Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead from Colin Winnette, a writer living in San Francisco. 

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

The Book Report is brought to you by KALW and the Litography Project, which is mapping the stories of the Bay Area’s literary scene. Find more Litography stories here

 

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