Rai Sue Sussman

Casey Miner

Earlier this month Drakes Bay Oyster Company,  in the Point Reyes National Seashore, closed its doors. That was after a long legal battle with the federal government that ordered the company to close so that Drakes Estero, which has been a commercial oyster farm for nearly 80 years,  could become the first fully protected marine wilderness area in the continental United States. The fight over Drakes Bay has stirred up a heated philosophical debate about how we want to interact with wilderness.

Flickr user rulenumberone2

All week long we've been playing this sound, and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Under CC license from Flickr user amehdiza.

This Thursday night, Paul McCartney will close the show at San Francisco’s Candlestick Park. It will be the final public event at the storied stadium. This week, we’re looking back at the defining memories of the park. 

Today, KALW morning announcer, Joe Burke – a born-and-raised San Franciscan and a die-hard 49ers and Giants fan – reflects on attending Giants games as a child.

Rai Sue Sussman


Rai Sue Sussman

On a rare sunny morning on San Francisco’s Mt. Sutro, I went on a hike with Rupa Bose, webmaster of an organization called Save Sutro. Bose lives in the Forest Knolls neighborhood abutting the eucalyptus forest. Though she’s lived in the neighborhood for longer, she started exploring the forest a few years ago.

Bose told me that “it was a shock to me that you could come out of a very ordinary San Francisco neighborhood, with houses and cars and step into this forest. It has birds and the wind in the trees. . . It doesn't feel like being in the city at all, it’s simply gorgeous.”

Rai Sue Sussman

The San Francisco 49ers are playing in the Super Bowl this weekend. (You might already know that.) It’s their sixth visit, but their first since 1994. The media has been covering the event like crazy, just like they do every year, so we were looking for a new angle … and we found something … old. Actually, someone.

Courtesy of SFMTA Livable Streets

The streets of San Francisco are changing. There are separated bike lanes on Market Street. There’s green paint all over the Wiggle. The city is definitely becoming more bicycle-friendly.

After many delays, the city’s bike plan is taking effect, with city streets long-designed for car traffic being reconfigured for other modes of transportation. Four years ago the city had 45 miles of bike lanes. Today there are 65 and more are scheduled to be laid down. Plus, 75 more miles of streets will be stenciled with symbols designating them as bike-friendly routes. It’s all having a big impact.