Rina Palta

Criminal Justice Reporter/Editor

Rina Palta reports on criminal justice for KALW News.  Through stories of those affected by the system, she hopes to bring insight to an often misunderstood, polarizing, and politicized issue.  Rina came to KALW from a print background, having worked in magazines for a number of years before being pulled into broadcast while earning a masters degree at UC Berkeley's School of Journalism.  Along with KALW, her work has been published in Mother Jones magazine, the San Francisco Weekly, and Hyphen magazine.  Rina edits and writes for KALW's criminal justice blog, The Informant, where you can find news and analysis on all aspects of California's criminal justice world.

Pages

2:48pm

Mon April 30, 2012
Cops & Courts

Could bail reform bail out California’s overcrowded jails?

Image courtesy of Flickr user http://www.flickr.com/photos/spike55151/

At the moment, Austin Hills is wearing an orange t-shirt, orange pants, and wrist shackles. He’s sitting in an interview room in the San Francisco County Jail in San Bruno.

Read more

4:05pm

Tue April 24, 2012
Politics

Secure Communities and the federal deportation program

Here in the Bay Area, we’ve seen the immigration debate manifest itself mostly in a controversy over the federal immigration program Secure Communities. The program requires local jails to share fingerprints of everyone they arrest with immigration enforcement officials. KALW’s Rina Palta sat down with the California Immigrant Policy Center's Jon Rodney to talk about how things are going.

Read more

3:34pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Cops & Courts

Is there such a thing as privacy in America?

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Jonathan Macintosh

Pulitzer Prize winner David Shipler has been a New York Times correspondent in Israel and Moscow. In his two most recent books, released earlier this year, he turns his attention to the erosion of civil liberties in the United States. In Rights at Risk and The Rights of the People, Shipler argues that both the War on Terror and the War on Crime have allowed the government to seep into Americans' personal lives in unconstitutional ways. Shipler discussed his new books with KALW's Criminal Justice Editor, Rina Palta.

Read more

2:58pm

Wed March 21, 2012
Cops & Courts

Correcting youth corrections in California

Paso Robles Youth Corrections Facility
Courtesy of Flickr user Shawn Thorpe.

This week, US Supreme Court took up the issue of life without parole for juvenile offenders. The question for the justices is whether children who commit murder should have the chance at some point in their lives to prove they should be let free.

Read more

4:14pm

Mon March 19, 2012
Cops & Courts

What worked to reduce crime in New York City

In the 1990s, New York was considered a dangerous place. The crack epidemic was still in full swing, and the city was at the peak of a national crime wave. Twenty years later, everything’s changed. New York’s crime rate has dropped dramatically and so has the state’s rate of locking people up in prison. How did this transformation occur? KALW’s Rina Palta sat down with Berkeley Law Professor, Franklin Zimring, to talk about his new book, The City That Became Safe: New York’s Lessons for Urban Crime and its Control.

Pages