Rose Aguilar

Host, Your Call

Rose Aguilar has been the host of Your Call since 2006. She became a regular Friday media roundtable guest in 2001. 

In 2005, Rose took a six-month road trip through the so-called 'red states' to find out why people vote the way they do (or not) and what issues they care about. Red Highways: A Journey into the Heartland chronicles her experience.

Rose has written for Al Jazeera English, Truthout, The Nation, and AlterNet. She's currently working on a book about older women activists and a new radio show focusing on investigative journalism. She is a member of the Native American Journalists Association and mentor-editor for The OpEd Project, an organization that works to increase the range of voices we hear in the media.

Before joining KALW, Rose published a newsletter about women's issues and was a reporter and weekend host for CNET Radio, where she covered technology's impact on society.  In college, she ran the TV and radio news departments and DJ'd a heavy metal show.

Rose's interests include hiking, camping, vegan living, animal rights, live music, and spending as much time underwater as possible. She volunteers for Students Rising Above, an organization that supports first generation college bound high school students.

Ways to Connect

Homeboy Industries

  

Father Gregory Boyle was a pastor at a church in Los Angeles in the late 1980s, a time of devastating gang violence. Boyle responded to the violence in the community by working with gang members and formerly incarcerated people. He started an organization that eventually came to be known as Homeboy Industries, now the largest gang rehabilitation project in the world. In his new book, Barking to the Choir: The power of radical kinship, Boyle explores the spiritual lessons learned from the stories of the former gang members he has worked with.

Master Steve Rapport / IndivisibleSF

  

Activists resisting the Trump administration have been organizing protests, mobilizing voters, and running for office. They have opposed restrictions on immigration, advocated for women’s rights, and spoken out against racial injustice. More than 250 Women’s March anniversary actions are planned for January 20. We’ll ask local organizers: Where has the movement succeeded, and what’s to come in 2018?

Guests:

We're marking MLK Jr. Day by discussing environmental justice with Mustafa Ali, the former head of the EPA's environmental justice program. Over the past 24 years, he's worked with hundreds of communities of color, low income communities, and indigenous populations.

An estimated eight percent of the world’s household financial wealth is held in offshore tax haven. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll speak with Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Jake Bernstein about his new book Secrecy World: Inside the Panama Papers Investigation of Illicit Money Networks and the Global Elite.

  

Women in low-wage jobs – janitors, domestic workers, farmworkers, waitresses – face rampant sexual abuse and assault on the job. When wages are low, there's no HR to report abuse and work sites can be isolated.

Photo by jseubring via Pixabay

  

Media outlets across the country have been rocked by the #metoo movement. From NBC to NPR, news organizations have fired or are investigating male journalists for sexual harassment. We’ll continue our #metoo series by talking about what happens when women in news media report sexual harassment, and what needs to change. How will this shift the media’s power structure?

 

Guests:

Katherine Goldstein, independent journalist who covers women and work for Slate, Vox and others

Photo by Chantal Cousineau

  

From judges and politicians to public radio hosts and actors, the power of the #metoo movement has brought down a wide range of powerful men for harassment and abuse.

By 2050, the oceans will contain more plastic than fish. On the next Your Call’s One Planet series, we’ll speak with Dr. Marcus Eriksen about his new book, Junk Raft: An Ocean Voyage and a Rising Tide of Activism to Fight Plastic Pollution.

Since December 28, tens of thousands of protestors have taken to the streets in more than 50 cities across Iran. They're demonstrating against dire economic conditions, and corruption. At least 20 people been killed and more than 1,000 have been arrested. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage.

Image by Valery Kenski, used under CC/Flickr

Photo by Kevin Tong / Used Under CC / flickr

  

How are students who are the first in their family to go to college faring?

On the first Your Call of 2018, we'll be joined by a panel of young environmental activists from around the Bay Area to discuss the state of the environmental movement.  How are they connecting global crises with local action? What did they accomplish in 2017 and what's at the top of their agenda for the new year?

  

Seattle Times environmental reporter Lynda Mapes spent a year studying a century-old oak tree in Massachusetts. On the next Your Call’s One Planet series, we’ll speak with Mapes about her new book, Witness Tree: Seasons of Change with a Century Old Oak.

  

During the climate conference in Bonn, Germany, delegates from nearly 200 countries worked on solutions to mitigate the impacts of climates change.

  

How can we give thanks while honoring the historic significance of Thanksgiving?

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2017/11/13/californias-jerry-brown-how-beat-trump-climate-change/857519001/

California makes international headlines for leading the way on global climate solutions. At the climate conference in Bonn, Germany, Governor Jerry Brown championed California’s role in transitioning to renewable energy, but activists called him out for continuing to promote oil and gas extraction in the state. How fast are we moving towards true sustainability?

What’s being done to protect wild orangutans and other endangered wildlife? On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with conservation scientist Dr. Ian Singleton about the discovery of a new orangutan species in the Indonesian forest.

Two months after hurricane Maria, many people in Puerto Rico are still living without electricity and clean drinking water. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico.

  

In Playing with Fire, MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell recalls the 1968 US presidential election that shaped American politics. 

  

In The Know-It-Alls, former New York Times technology columnist Noam Cohen chronicles the political rise of Silicon Valley.

  

As long as there has been fascism, there has been anti-fascism — also known as antifa.

On the next Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll discuss the relationship between climate change and physical and mental health with Drs. Jay Lemery and Paul Auerbach, authors of Enviromedics: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health.

© 2016 Khaled Abdullah / Reuters

Last weekend, Mohamad Bin Salman, the Saudi Crown Prince and the architect of the devastating war in Yemen, ordered the arrests of some of the country’s top political and business elites. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the ongoing crackdowns in Saudi Arabia.

Robbin Légère Henderson’s new book, Immigrant Girl, Radical Woman: A Memoir from the Early Twentieth Century, pays homage to her grandmother, Matilda Rabinowitz.

Used Under CC via Pixabay

  

#Metoo continues to make international headlines. Actresses, actors, journalists, and politicians are sharing stories about sexual harassment and assault.

  

What are the psychological, environmental, and economic costs of war? That’s the question a number of contributors explore in The War and Environment Reader, edited by Gar Smith.

This week, former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his business associate Rick Gates were indicted on a long list of crimes, including money laundering. Earlier this month, Donald Trump’s foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the investigation into Russian meddling in the election.

  

How did one factory challenge the apparel industry’s sweatshops? The Alta Gracia factory in the Dominican Republic is the only factory in the global south to pay workers a living wage.

Over the past 50 years, Americans have become more and more sick, unhappy, and broken. In his new book, The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains, Dr. Robert Lusting argues that corporations are maximizing profits by exploiting  our brain physiology and chemistry to conflate pleasure with happiness.

Pages