Steven Short

Reporter/Producer

Steven has been with KALW News since it’s beginnings in 2004. His history, art and public interest stories have won awards for Breaking News, Feature Writing and Explanatory Journalism. Some of his reports have aired nationally on NPR.

He is responsible for The Source, a recurring feature on the origins of Bay Area place names. He also researches most of the listings for the Crosscurrents local music calendar and compiles the weekly online Cannabis News Round-up.

Ways To Connect

Beatles Karaoke

Feb 29, 2012
photo credit: Terry Lorant

The vocalist you’re hearing is Dana Harnik, participating in the monthly all-Beatles karaoke night at Café Royale on Post Street in San Francisco. Note that this is no “follow the bouncing ball” laser-disc performance. Joshua Raoul Brody, of the band Tango Number 9, plays live piano to match each singer’s style. The next event takes place Monday, March 5, and the first Monday of every month. Music begins about 8pm, and a book of lyrics is provided.

 

The practice of fracking on oil wells near Taft, California has been approved by the state Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources. Fracking – the practice of injecting steam underground at high pressure to break up porous soil to release oil – had been banned within 150 feet of any wells known to be seeping oil...

Emeryville, best known for big box stores and a movie complex, currently has something San Francisco lacks: a poet laureate.

One would expect San Francisco, home of the beat poets of the fifties, to have the position – and it does, but the term of the previous poet has expired. This will be remedied soon; candidates interested in the post have two more days to file.

Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

Perhaps you’ve been to an art gallery or museum exhibit where you didn’t... fully understand the artist’s intentions. You know: “My kindergartener could do that” syndrome. Scottish philosopher David Hume put it this way: “When objects of any kind are first presented to the eye or imagination, the sentiment, which attends them, is obscure and confused; and the mind is, in a great measure, incapable of pronouncing, concerning their merits or defects.” [Of the Standard of Taste, 1757] 

Dan Hicks

Feb 23, 2012
Photo Courtesy of Dan Hicks

You’ve probably heard of Bay Area music mainstay Dan Hicks and His Hot Licks. But have you ever heard them perform live? The Chronicle says of Hicks, "So few truly original figures exist in pop music that Dan Hicks should be a national treasure."

He has a big 70th birthday celebration at San Francisco’s Davies Hall in April, but you can hear him in a more relaxed show tomorrow (February 24) at the Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center, in Livermore, starting at 8pm. 

Zodiac Death Valley

Feb 16, 2012

The music you’re hearing now is by Zodiac Death Valley. This San Francisco band calls themselves “the loudest folk band in the world.” You can judge for yourself on Saturday (02.18), when they take the stage at The Independent in San Francisco.

Alma D

Feb 15, 2012
Photo Courtesy of Alma D

 The Wall Street Journal has recognized a Bay Area band called Alma Desnuda – or just Alma D to their friends for their innovative business practices, but they’re also passionate about philanthropy. Plus, you can dance to their music! They’re taking the stage at the intimate Boom Boom Room in San Francisco on Friday, starting about 10pm.

Photo courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/livenature/2556769885/

Everyone acknowledges that San Francisco is different. Maybe that’s why there are so many songs about the city by the bay.  So many, in fact, that it’s perhaps the only city in the country – and maybe the world – with not one, but two official songs.

Buxter Hoot'n

Feb 14, 2012
Photo Courtesy of Buxter Hoot'n

You might have heard of Butxter Hoot’n band last month on another KALW program: “West Coast Live.” The East Bay Express says their unique song writing, and tight-knit performances make Buxter Hoot’n “an experience not to be missed.” You’ll have the opportunity not to miss them this Thursday (February 16), when they take the stage at The Hemlock Tavern in San Francisco, starting about 9pm.

photo: Courtesy of The NAMES Project

The AIDS quilt has come home for a visit.

Considered by organizers to be the largest participatory art project in the world, the AIDS Memorial Quilt began spontaneously on San Francisco’s Market Street a generation ago, when gay rights activist Cleve Jones asked people to create quilt panels memorializing loved ones who had died of AIDS-related causes.

That was in 1987; today, over 91,000 individuals have been memorialized on more than 5,800 quilt panels, each the symbolic size of a coffin (3 X 6 ft.).

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