Todd Whitney

Producer/Reporter

Todd is a radio producer from Chicagoland. Before arriving at KALW in 2013 he produced works for NPR's Tell Me More. He currently roams the Bay Area searching for stories and super sonics. 

http://www.a-1music.com/blog/ // Left Lane

San Francisco rapper Adam Vida pairs his songs with video that often goes viral, including one shot spontaneously at the riots that followed the San Francisco Giants 2010 World Series win. In this installment of Bay Area Beats, Adam Vida talks about the evolution of his sound.

Photo courtesy of Rue Mapp

 

One of the Bay Area’s main attractions is its proximity to nature. Only 45 minutes separate Bay Area residents from arriving at the ocean, the mountains, or a hiking trail. But not everybody experiences the Bay Area’s natural beauty.

Todd Whitney

 

If you have walked the streets of the Bay Area recently -- you might have seen posters featuring the names and faces of Oscar Grant, Renisha McBride, Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin, among others. 

Ta Sin Sabir

Where Kids Take Flight in Bayview from KALW News on Vimeo.

Bayview has long been known as San Francisco’s industrial hub. But on Yosemite Street there’s an imposing brick building with a dance studio. Inside the space there's a group of young people who climb on pieces of welded iron that hang three feet off the ground. They run and mess around with each other during breaks. But their joviality turns to concentration when they get in the air. Up there they’re spinning, floating, and thriving.

Robert F. Oaks

 

San Francisco's reputation as one of America's most ethnically diverse cities is in question as its African Americans population erodes. In 1990, 11% of city residents were Black. Now that number is just 6% and is expected to drop below 4% by 2020.

Todd Whitney

 

The Three Point Nine Collective is a group of Black artists in San Francisco. They take their name from the expected percentage of Black San Franciscans left by the 2020 census.

Todd Whitney

For over a decade, Oakland has attempted to abate the illegal dumping of mattresses, electronics, furniture, and other large items onto city streets. The phenomenon is a problem throughout the Bay Area, but noticeably worse in Oakland.

William Rhodes

 

In 2008, artist William Rhodes moved to San Francisco from Baltimore. Immediately after arriving, he noticed the exodus of Black folks leaving the city and decided to co-found the Three Point Nine Collective in an attempt to bring together the city's Black artists. He speaks with KALW's Todd Whitney about one of his works of art.

 

 

    

 

 

 

Todd Whitney

When Chris Magnus took over the Richmond Police Department in 2006, he was tasked with cutting back violent crime in what was then known as one of America’s most dangerous cities.

http://miamckenzie.net/

Earlier this month, a police officer in South Carolina was arrested for murder, after a video of him shooting an unarmed black man at a traffic stop was released. This arrest follows a year of high profile police shootings of black men, shootings that led to protests and discussions about race in Oakland --- like Black Brunch and the Black Lives Matter campaign. But in many ways, we are just joining a conversation that’s been going on for a while. Oakland's Mia McKenzie has been writing about black, brown and queer identity in her blog Black Girl Dangerous since 2011.

Todd Whitney


Turning on your faucet may be easy, but the process of getting you that water is anything but. Water has a long journey to get to your tap, often starting in the mountains, traveling through aqueducts, and stopping over in reservoirs along the way. The reservoirs that hold our water can sometimes take on a life of their own, supporting whole ecosystems of animals and plants. 

Dave Getzschman

Jennifer Piallat has worked in most every aspect of the restaurant industry – dishwasher, waitstaff, chef, manager – and those experiences have informed her decisions as owner of Zazie, a popular bistro in San Francisco's Cole Valley. Her employees receive a living wage, and benefits, and she's testified about her philosophies and process before the U.S. Department of Labor.

Ben Trefny

 

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, San Francisco passed a variety of measures to help low wage workers try to keep up with the rising cost of living. The city now has the highest minimum wage in the country at 10 dollars 74 cents an hour. It also requires employers to either provide health benefits or pay into a pool so the city can cover their health care costs.

Flickr user Kristy Johnson

KALW's Todd Whitney researched what it really costs to live in the Bay Area. He and Ben Trefny sat down to check out the results.

"So we're talking nearly $33 an hour. Or you can think of it this way: that's two adults earning nearly $17 an hour." -Todd Whitney

Click on the audio player above to listen to whole segment

StoryCorps

After serving time in the Air Force, Nathan Baxter, an African American man from Pennsylvania, ended up in the South in the 1960s. Baxter learned a lot of lessons during and after his service – one of which was how difficult it could be to be a black man in the South at that time. He stopped by mobile Storycorps booth in Oakland to share some never-told experiences with his descendants.

Todd Whitney

 

City Hall isn’t the only place you will find Oakland’s namesake, the oak tree. Step foot in the East Bay and you will quickly come across t-shirts, hoodies, hats, and stickers that brandish an image of the iconic tree. This wave of Oakland-themed apparel reaches back to the year 2000 when Oaklandish, a civic pride apparel brand, popped up.