10:02am

Thu May 17, 2012
Politics, connecting the dots

Connecting the Dots: Top News Stories for Thursday, May 17, 2012

(San Jose Mercury News) // On Wednesday, the California Supreme Court agreed to hear a case determining whether the State Bar has the authority to allow an undocumented immigrant to practice law. Sergio Garcia, an undocumented immigrant who graduated from Chico State University and a Florida law school, passed the Bar exam in 2009...

(Bay Citizen) // Despite a voter-approved ban against billboards in 2002, a new lawsuit suggests that San Francisco billboards still proliferate the city. Proposition G banned billboards on private properties, but community organization San Francisco Beautiful is suing the city, arguing that it is not doing enough to enforce the ban...

(Bay Citizen) // According to a recent report by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, California is issuing fewer credentials for public school service positions like nurses, librarians and school administrators. Only school counselors saw an increase in the number of credentials issued...

(Contra Costa Times) // Bay Area municipal governments are scheduled to adopt an initiative tonight called the "Bay Area Growth Plan." It is meant to cut air pollution by redirecting new housing, shops and jobs into transit corridors. Adherence to the plan is voluntary, but giving it up means giving away eligibility for hundreds of millions of dollars in road and transit money from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. Advocates for the poor want suburbs to include plans for more affordable housing, but suburbanites are against urban-style development in their communities...

(East Bay Express) // The FCC is preparing to give licenses to small community or micro-radio stations in California in the coming months. In January, President Barack Obama signed the Community Radio Act, which ordered the opening of the airwaves to over 1,000 low-powered frequency modulation stations (LPFM). Now, the FCC is looking to open up airwaves in urban areas like Berkeley, Oakland, and San Francisco, where a crowded radio band prevented any LPFM stations during the first round of licensing...

(Sacramento Bee) // Voters in Richmond will be the first in the nation to decide whether to impose what could be the country's first municipal tax on soda and other sugary beverages. The tax, which would be a penny-per ounce surcharge, would go into the city's general fund and could potentially raise between $2 million and $8 million for anti-obesity projects.

Connecting the Dots brings the day's news together. Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter, we're @kalwnews.

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