5:43am

Fri July 13, 2012
KALW ALMANAC

Friday the 13th of July 2012

  • 195th Day of 2012 / 171 Remaining
  • 71 Days Until Autumn Begins
  • Sunrise:5:59
  • Sunset:8:32
  • 14 Hours 33 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:1:38am
  • Moon Set:4:08pm
  • Moon’s Phase: 25 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • August 1 @ 8:27pm
  • Full Sturgeon Moon
  • Full Red Moon
  • Full Green Corn Moon
  • Full Grain Moon

The fishing tribes are given credit for the naming of this Moon, since sturgeon, a large fish of the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water, were most readily caught during this month. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the Moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or Grain Moon.

  • Tides
  • High:8:48am/7:17pm
  • Low:2:04am/1:11pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:0.00
  • Last Year:0.00
  • Normal To Date:0.00
  • Annual Seasonal Average: 23.80
  • Holidays
  • Triskaidekaphobia Day
  • Embrace Your Geekness Day
  • Gruntled Workers Day
  • National French Fries Day
  • Childhood Memories Day
  • Cow Appreciation Day
  • Bottled Beer Day
  • O - Bon / Festival of Souls-Japan
  • Statehood Day-Montenegro
  • World Cup Day-(The first World Cup soccer competition was held on this date in 1930 in Montevideo, Uruguay with 14 countries participating. Two weeks later Uruguay took the cup by defeating Argentina)
  • On This Day In …
  • 1568 --- The Dean of Saint Paul's Cathedral in London perfected a way to bottle beer.
  • 1787 --- The U.S. Congress, under the Articles of Confederation, enacted the Northwest Ordinance, which established the rules for governing the Northwest Territory, for admitting new states to the Union and limiting the expansion of slavery.
  • 1836 --- John Ruggles of Thomaston, Maine received patent #1 from the U.S. Patent Office under a new patent-numbering system. Before Ruggles, a U.S. Senator from Maine and the author of the 1836 Patent Act which brought back the examination process, there had been 9,957 non-numbered patents issued. Ruggles received his patent for a traction wheel used in locomotive steam engines.
  • 1863 --- Rioting against the Civil War military draft erupted in New York City; about 1,000 people died over three days.
  • 1876 --- George Washington Bradley pitched the first no-hitter in baseball, leading St. Louis to a 2-0 win over Hartford.
  • 1878 --- The Congress of Berlin divided the Balkans among European powers.
  • 1923 --- A sign consisting of 50-foot-tall letters spelling out "HOLLYWOODLAND" was dedicated in the Hollywood Hills to promote a subdivision (the last four letters were removed in 1949)
  • 1930 --- France defeats Mexico 4-1 and the United States defeats Belgium 3-0 in the first-ever World Cup football matches, played simultaneously in host city Montevideo, Uruguay. The World Cup has since become the world’s most watched sporting event. After football (soccer, to Americans) was dropped from the program for the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles, FIFA President Jules Rimet helped to organize an international tournament in 1930. Much to the dismay of European footballers, Uruguay, winner of back-to-back gold medals at the 1924 Paris Olympics and 1928 Amsterdam Olympics, was chosen to host the inaugural World Cup. Due to depression in Europe, many European players, afraid their day jobs would not exist when they returned, were either unable or unwilling to attend the tournament. As a result, some of the most accomplished European teams, including three-time Olympic gold medalist England and football enthusiasts Italy, Spain, Germany and Holland did not make an appearance at the first World Cup. However, when Uruguay agreed to help pay traveling expenses, Rimet was able to convince Belgium, France, Romania and Yugoslavia to make the trip. In Romania, King Carol selected the team members himself, gave them a three-month vacation from their jobs and guaranteed the players would be employed when they returned. Going into the tournament, Uruguay and Argentina were the overwhelming favorites, while France and the United States also fielded competitive sides. In the first round, France’s Lucien Laurent scored the first-ever World Cup goal. In its second game, France lost to Argentina 1-0 amid controversy over the referees ending the game six minutes early. Once the problem was discovered, the referees had to bring the Argentine players back onto the field to play the final minutes. After beating Belgium, the United States beat Paraguay to set up a semi-final match with Argentina, which they lost 6-1. Still, the semi-final placement was the best U.S. World Cup finish to date.
  • 1972 --- Carroll Rosenbloom (owner of the Baltimore Colts) and Robert Irsay (owner of the Los Angeles Rams) traded teams.
  • 1985 --- "This is your Woodstock, and it's long overdue." That was the introduction offered by 1960s folk icon Joan Baez at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at the opening of the North American portion of Live Aid on this day in 1985. The biggest rock concert and charity event in the history of the world, staged simultaneously on two sides of the Atlantic Ocean and broadcast globally to an audience of 1.5 billion, bore little resemblance to the chaotic, hedonistic and profit-making Woodstock Music and Arts Festival, however. Conceived and organized by the Irish pop star Bob Geldof in response to the disastrous east African famine of 1984-1985, Live Aid raised upwards of £40 million (then equivalent to roughly $50 million) in relief aid via ticket sales and direct contributions from television viewers. Live Aid grew out of Geldof's groundbreaking Band Aid project, which pioneered the use of record sales as a large-scale fundraising mechanism. Band Aid's "Do They Know It's Christmas" directly inspired USA For Africa's "We Are The World," just as Geldof's Live Aid would directly inspire Farm Aid and countless other large-scale musical fundraising events. Still better known in 1985 as the lead singer of the Boomtown Rats than as a philanthropist, Bob Geldof announced plans for Live Aid in the spring of 1985 and convinced a lineup of some of the era's biggest names to appear on the bill without compensation, including Sting, Madonna, Sade, Dire Straits, Wham and Phil Collins, who appeared both at Wembley Stadium in London and at JFK in Philadelphia thanks to a transatlantic flight on the Concorde. Even more impressive was the list of rock giants who participated: The Who, Elton John, Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Tina Turner, Paul McCartney, Bob Dylan, Black Sabbath, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and—in a powerhouse performance at Wembley—Queen. Even with such a monumental lineup, Live Aid was not nearly as memorable for its music as for its mission. There was no moment to rival Jimi Hendrix's legendary "Star Spangled Banner" wakeup at Woodstock, for instance. In the UK, the future Sir Bob Geldof is fondly remembered for exhorting viewers of the Live BBC broadcast to "Give us your [expletive] money," though he never actually said those words. He was, however, a constant, hectoring presence on screen during breaks between musical sets and did at one point use a choice expletive in urging the BBC presenter to encourage telephone credit-card donations rather than mail-in ones. His efforts helped make Live Aid a smashing success and a model on which many future fundraising events would be based.
  • 1992 --- An appeals court in New York ruled that Jett Williams, the secret daughter of Hank Williams Senior, was entitled to share the royalties from his songs. In 1984, Jett had hired investigator Keith Adkinson, who found that Jett had been deliberately defrauded out of her father’s estate and his copyright royalties. Adkinson sued on her behalf. On October 26, 1987 the Alabama Circuit Court ruled that Hank Williams was Jett’s father. On July 5, 1989 the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that Jett had been defrauded, and awarded her half of her father’s estate. And on July 13, 1992 the federal court in New York awarded Jett her proportionate share of her father's copyright renewal royalties.
  • 1993 --- To keep witnesses from describing his clothing, a 19-year-old man stripped naked to rob a Los Angeles bank and ran out with two shopping bags filled with cash. Nearby sheriff’s deputies, noticing a naked man running down the street with two bags full of money, arrested him immediately.
  • Birthdays
  • Paul Prudhomme
  • Harrison Ford
  • Cheech Marin
  • Roger McGuinn
  • Patrick Stewart
  • Cameron Crowe
  • Bob Crane
  • Didi Conn
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