5:53am

Fri April 12, 2013
KALW Almanac

Friday April 12, 2013

  • 102nd Day of 2013 / 263 Remaining
  • 70 Days Until The First Day of Summer
  • Sunrise:6:36
  • Sunset:7:43
  • 13 Hours 7 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:7:54am
  • Moon Set:10:16pm
  • Moon’s Phase:6 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • April 25 @ 12:59pm
  • Full Pink Moon
  • Full Sprouting Grass Moon
  • Full Egg Moon
  • Full Fish Moon

This moon’s  name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. Other names for this month’s celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

  • Tides
  • High:12:11am/1:38pm
  • Low:6:54am/6:50pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:16.31
  • Last Year:14.18
  • Normal To Date:22.18
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • National Grilled Cheese Day
  • National Licorice Day
  • National Be Kind to Lawyers Day
  • National Licorice Day
  • Walk On Your Wild Side Day
  • Children's Day-Florida
  • Cosmonauts Day-Rusia
  • National Redemption Day-Liberia
  • On This Day In …
  • 1606 --- England's King James I decreed the design of the original Union Flag, which combined the flags of England and Scotland.
  • 1633 --- Chief inquisitor Father Vincenzo Maculano da Firenzuola, appointed by Pope Urban VIII, begins the inquisition of physicist and astronomer Galileo Galilei. Galileo  was ordered to turn himself in to the Holy Office to begin trial for holding the belief that the Earth revolves around the Sun, which was deemed heretical by the Catholic Church. Standard practice demanded that the accused be imprisoned and secluded during the trial. This was the second time that Galileo was in the hot seat for refusing to accept Church orthodoxy that the Earth was the immovable center of the universe: In 1616, he had been forbidden from holding or defending his beliefs. In the 1633 interrogation, Galileo denied that he "held" belief in the Copernican view but continued to write about the issue and evidence as a means of "discussion" rather than belief. The Church had decided the idea that the Sun moved around the Earth was an absolute fact of scripture that could not be disputed, despite the fact that scientists had known for centuries that the Earth was not the center of the universe.
  • 1770 --- The British government moves to mollify outraged colonists by repealing most of the clauses of the hated Townshend Act. Initially passed on June 29, 1767, the Townshend Act constituted an attempt by the British government to consolidate fiscal and political power over the American colonies by placing import taxes on many of the British products bought by Americans, including lead, paper, paint, glass and tea.
  • 1833 --- Charles Gaylor patented the fireproof safe in New York City. The safes are widely used to protect everything from priceless art to sensitive computer software. Some safes can burn at 1,700 degrees Fahrenheit for an hour and the contents will still be as cool as a cucumber. Other units can sustain heat up to 400-500 degrees for about the same time without damaging the valuable contents within.
  • 1847 --- Yung Wing, one of several Chinese students to arrive in America this day, went on to become the first student from China to graduate from Yale University [1854].
  • 1861 --- The bloodiest four years in American history begin when Confederate shore batteries under General P.G.T. Beauregard open fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina's Charleston Bay. During the next 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort. On April 13, U.S. Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to quell the Southern "insurrection."
  • 1877 --- The catcher for Harvard's baseball team, James Tyng, wore a modified fencing mask behind the plate. It is believed to be the first time a catcher's mask was used during a game.
  • 1914 --- The Mark Strand Theatre opens to the public in New York City. Located at Broadway and 47th Street, in the heart of Manhattan’s Theater District, the theater was the creation of Mitchell L. Mark, who began his motion-picture career as a producer but later became an exhibitor. Before 1914, motion-picture exhibitors had generally showcased their offerings behind modest storefronts, dubbed “nickelodeons” after the original Nickelodeon that opened in Pittsburgh in 1905. By contrast, the Mark Strand Theatre--later known simply as the Strand--was the first of the so-called “dream palaces,” called as such for their impressive size and luxuriously appointed interiors. The Strand seated around 3,000 people and boasted a second-floor viewing balcony and (in an architectural innovation at the time) a two-story rotunda where moviegoers could socialize before and after the presentation and during intermission.
  • 1934 --- F. Scott Fitzgerald novel "Tender Is the Night" was first published.
  • 1939 --- Woody Herman’s orchestra recorded "Woodchopper’s Ball."
  • 1954 --- Bill Haley and His Comets recorded Rock Around the Clock for Decca Records. The song was recorded at the Pythian Temple, “a big, barnlike building with great echo,” in New York City. Rock Around the Clock was formally released a month later. Most rock historians feel the tune, featured in the 1955 film Blackboard Jungle, ushered in the era of rock ’n’ roll. It hit number one on June 29, 1955 and stayed there for eight weeks, remaining on the charts for a total of 24 weeks.
  • 1961 --- Aboard the spacecraft Vostok 1, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin becomes the first human being to travel into space. During the flight, the 27-year-old test pilot and industrial technician also became the first man to orbit the planet, a feat accomplished by his space capsule in 89 minutes. Vostok 1 orbited Earth at a maximum altitude of 187 miles and was guided entirely by an automatic control system. The only statement attributed to Gagarin during his one hour and 48 minutes in space was, "Flight is proceeding normally; I am well." After his historic feat was announced, the attractive and unassuming Gagarin became an instant worldwide celebrity. He was awarded the Order of Lenin and given the title of Hero of the Soviet Union. Monuments were raised to him across the Soviet Union and streets renamed in his honor.
  • 1963 --- Police used dogs and cattle prods on peaceful civil rights demonstrators in Birmingham, AL.
  • 1966 --- Emmett Ashford became the first African-American major league umpire.
  • 1981 --- The space shuttle Columbia is launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, becoming the first reusable manned spacecraft to travel into space. Piloted by astronauts Robert L. Crippen and John W. Young, the Columbia undertook a 54-hour space flight of 36 orbits before successfully touching down at California's Edwards Air Force Base on April 14.
  • 1983 --- Harold Washington was elected Chicago's first African-American mayor.
  • 1985 --- Federal inspectors declared that four animals of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus were not unicorns, as the circus said, but goats with horns which had been surgically implanted. The circus was ordered to quit advertising the fake unicorns as anything else but goats.
  • 1999 --- U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright found President Bill Clinton in contempt of court for giving "intentionally false" testimony in a lawsuit filed by Paula Jones about his relationship with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.
  • 2002 --- A first edition version of Beatrix Potter's "Peter Rabbit" sold for $64,780 at Sotheby's. A signed first edition of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Hobbit" sold for $66,630. A copy of "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone," signed by J.K. Rowling sold for $16,660. A 250-piece collection of rare works by Charles Dickens sold for $512,650.
  • Birthdays
  • Amy Ray
  • David Cassidy
  • David Letterman
  • Vince Gill
  • Herbie Hancock
  • Andy Garcia
  • Claire Danes
  • Henry Clay
  • Lily Pons
  • Ann Miller
  • Tiny Tim (Herbert Khaury)
  • Jane Withers
  • Scott Turow
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