5:31am

Fri February 10, 2012
KALW ALMANAC

Friday February 10, 2012

  • 41st Day of 2012 / 325 Remaining
  • 39 Days Until Spring Begins
  • Sunrise:7:05
  • Sunset:5:43
  • 10 Hr 38 Min
  • Moon Rise:9:21pm
  • Moon Set:8:22am
  • Moon’s Phase: 89 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • March 8 @ 1:41 am
  • Full Worm Moon

As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

  • Tides
  • High:12:24am/12:13pm
  • Low:6:13am/6:24pm
  • Rainfall
  • This Year:6.32
  • Last Year:12.67
  • Normal To Date:14.37
  • Annual Average: 22.28
  • Holidays
  • Plimsoll Day
  • National Cream Cheese Brownie Day
  • National Stop Bullying Day
  • National Umbrella Day
  • Try to Invent A New Jell-O Flavor Day
  • Oruro Local Festival-Bolivia
  • Feast of St Paul’s Shipwreck-Malta
  • On This Day In …
  • 0060 --- The Apostle Paul was shipwrecked near the island of Malta.
  • 1763 --- France ceded Canada to England under the Treaty of Paris, which ended the French and Indian War.
  • 1846 --- Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints – the Mormons – began an exodus west from Illinois.
  • 1870 --- The YWCA was founded in New York City.
  • 1897 ---- The phrase "All the news that's fit to print" first appeared on the front page of the New York Times. It had first appeared on the editorial page on October 25, 1896. Henry J. Raymond and two associates started The New York Times in 1851. It began as a penny paper ... one cent for news vs. the six-cent political rags of the day. In October of 1896, the paper held a contest offering readers a one-hundred-dollar prize if they could come up with a better slogan ... in ten words or less ... than “All the news that’s fit to print.” No one did. And no one has, since. Over one million people read The New York Times every day, making it the seventh most-read paper in the world and the third in the United States, behind The Wall Street Journal and USA Today.
  • 1920 --- Major league baseball representatives outlawed pitches that involve tampering with the ball
  • 1933 --- The Postal Telegraph Co. of New York City delivers the first singing telegram.
  • 1934 --- The first imperforated, ungummed sheets of postage stamps were issued by the U.S. Postal Service in New York City. Talk about inconvenience! One had to cut the stamps out of the sheet and then put some glue on the back to get them to stick on an envelope. Fortunately, the Postal Service changed this idea after many complaints. Letters were, literally, gumming up the works...
  • 1942 --- History's first gold record was awarded to the Glenn Miller Orchestra for "Chattanooga Choo Choo." RCA presented a gold-sprayed master disc to Miller during a radio broadcast.
  • 1949 --- "Jumping Joe" Fulks of the Philadelphia Warriors introduced the jump shot, scoring a then-NBA record 63 points against the Indianapolis Jets. The record stood for a decade until Elgin Baylor scored 64 on November 8, 1959.
  • 1949 --- Lee J. Cobb, Arthur Kennedy and Mildred Dunnock starred in the classic, Death of a Salesman, which opened at the Morosco Theatre in New York City. The play later became a major motion picture.
  • 1956 --- Elvis Presley wiggled his way through Heartbreak Hotel this day for RCA Records in Nashville, TN. The record received two gold records, one for each side. The hit on the other side was I Was the One
  • 1957 --- The ‘Styrofoam’ cooler was invented.
  • 1961 --- The Los Angeles franchise in the American Football League was transferred to San Diego. The previous year, Hollywood resident Gerald Courtney had won an all-expenses-paid trip to Mexico City and Acapulco after submitting the winning name: Chargers. Three reasons for choosing Chargers have been offered: 1) It sounded dynamic, 2) The club’s new stationary featured a horse and 3) Owner Baron Hilton had recently instituted the Carte Blanche card.
  • 1962 --- The Soviet Union exchanged captured American U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers for Rudolph Ivanovich Abel, a Soviet spy held by the United States.
  • 1964 --- Bob Dylan's album "The Times They Are A-Changin"' was released.
  • 1966 --- Ralph Nader, a young lawyer and the author of the groundbreaking book "Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile," testifies before Congress for the first time about unsafe practices in the auto industry.
  • 1967 --- The 25th Amendment to the Constitution, dealing with presidential disability and succession, was ratified by the U.S. Congress this day. The amendment provided, in part, “In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President.”
  • 1972 --- It was one of those events that virtually nobody witnessed, yet almost but many wish they had: the concert at London's Toby Jug pub on February 10, 1972, when the relatively minor rocker named David Bowie became the spaceman Ziggy Stardust. While it might be said of many such historic moments—like John meeting Paul at a backyard birthday party, or Elvis ad-libbing "That's All Right (Mama)" between takes at Sun Studios—that their significance became clear only in hindsight, there was at least one man who knew exactly where Ziggy's earthly debut would lead: David Bowie himself. "I'm going to be huge," is what David Bowie told Melody Maker less than three weeks earlier and still six months prior to the release of the album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. "And it's quite frightening in a way, because I know that when I reach my peak and it's time for me to be brought down it will be with a bump." 
  • 1989 --- Ronald H. Brown, a former Supreme Court lawyer and leader of the National Urban League, is elected chairman of the Democratic Party National Committee. He was the first African American to hold the top position in a major political party in the United States.
  • 1996 --- In the first game of a six-game match, an IBM computer dubbed “Deep Blue” becomes the first machine to beat a reigning world chess champion, Garry Kasparov. Despite this initial upset victory, man ultimately triumphed over machine as Kasparov goes went on to win the match, 4-2.
  • Birthdays
  • Boris Pasternak
  • Leontyne Price
  • Roberta Flack
  • Charles Lamb
  • Bertolt Brecht
  • Lon Chaney, Jr.
  • Laura Dern
  • Robert Wagner
  • Mark Spitz
  • George Stephanopoulos
  • Jimmy Durante
  • Harold Macmillan
Tags: