5:30am

Fri June 1, 2012
KALW ALMANAC

Friday June 1, 2012

  • 153rd Day of 2012 / 213 Remaining
  • 19 Days Until Summer Begins
  • Sunrise:5:49
  • Sunset:8:27
  • 14 Hours 38 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:5:37pm
  • Moon Set:3:26am
  • Moon’s Phase: 89 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • June 4 @ 4:11am
  • Full Strawberry Moon
  • Full Rose Moon
  • Full Milk Moon

This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June, so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

  • Tides
  • High:9:32am/8:49pm
  • Low:2:58am/2:30pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:15.67
  • Last Year:27.39
  • Normal To Date:23.63
  • Annual Seasonal Average: 23.80
  • Holidays
  • National Go Barefoot Day
  • Say Something Nice Day
  • Admission Day-Kentucky
  • Admission Day-Tennessee
  • Early Bird Day
  • Hurricane season begins. It lasts until November.
  • Don't Give Up the Ship Day
  • National Running Day
  • Independence Day-Samoa
  • International Children's Day
  • Yom Yerushalayim-Israel
  • Jubilee-Peru
  • Madaraka Day-Kenya
  • Mother & Child Day-Mongolia
  • National Tree Planting Day-Cambodia
  • Presidents Day-Palau
  • The Festival of Roses, Valley of the Roses-Bulgaria
  • June is …
  • National Soul Food Month
  • National Candy Month
  • National Dairy Month
  • National Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Month
  • National Hunger Awareness Month
  • National Iced Tea Month
  • National Papaya Month
  • National Seafood Month
  • Turkey Lovers' Month
  • Let's Get Married Month
  • Adopt a Shelter Cat Month
  • Accordion Awareness Month
  • Bathroom Reading Month
  • Cancer from the Sun Month
  • Celibacy Awareness Month
  • Children's Awareness Month
  • No-Dairy Month
  • Fireworks Safety Month
  • Great Outdoors Month
  • International Men's Month
  • Turkey Lovers' Month
  • Potty Training Awareness Month
  • National Rose Month
  • National Turkey Lovers Month
  • On This Day In …
  • 1533 --- Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII’s new queen, was crowned.
  • 1792 --- Kentucky entered the United States of America as the 15th state. Since its name is an American Indian word for "great meadow", it is fitting that Kentucky’s nickname is the Bluegrass State, and its flower is the goldenrod. The official state bird is the cardinal. The capital of Kentucky is the city of Frankfort.
  • 1796 --- Tennessee joined the United States of America on this day. Long before it officially became the 16th state, Tennessee had already begun to earn its nickname, the Volunteer State, as it sent large numbers of volunteers to fight in the American Revolution. The tradition continued for the War of 1812, the Mexican War and the Civil War. The country-music capital of the world, Nashville, is also the governmental capital of Tennessee. The state’s official flower is the iris, its bird, the mockingbird.
  • 1869 --- Thomas Edison received a patent for his electric voting machine.
  • 1925 --- Lou Gehrig of the New York Yankees played the first of what would become 2,130 consecutive baseball games (Gehrig played in every Yankee game until May 2, 1939), setting a major-league record not to be broken until Cal Ripken, Jr. of Baltimore did so in the summer of 1995. Gehrig wasn’t even a starter on this day. He was inserted in the lineup for Wally Pipp.
  • 1938 --- The first issue of Action Comics was published. In its pages was the world’s first super hero, Superman. Jerry Siegel had a dream about the baby, Moses, who was abandoned by his parents in order that his life be saved. This dream prompted Siegel’s creation of the ‘Man of Steel’. Artist Joe Shuster made the comic book hero come alive. The first story, in this first issue, took place on the planet, Krypton, where baby Kal-El was born. The infant was shot to Earth in a rocket just before Krypton exploded. We all know the rest of the story: the baby landed in Smalltown, U.S.A., was adopted by the Kent family and named, Clark. On Earth, Clark Kent had superhuman powers, “faster than a speeding bullet ... more powerful than a locomotive ... able to leap tall buildings at a single bound.” The only thing that could render him powerless was kryptonite, a green rock from the planet Krypton. Disguised as a timid, bespectacled reporter for Metropolis’ Daily Planet (with coworkers Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen and boss Perry White), Superman was determined to fight the “never-ending battle for truth, justice and the American way.”
  • 1938 --- Baseball helmets were worn for the first time.
  • 1958 --- During a French political crisis over the military and civilian revolt in Algeria, Charles de Gaulle is called out of retirement to head a new emergency government. Considered the only leader of sufficient strength and stature to deal with the perilous situation, the former war hero was made the virtual dictator of France, with power to rule by decree for six months. A veteran of World War I, de Gaulle unsuccessfully petitioned his country to modernize its armed forces in the years before the outbreak of World War II. After French Premier Henri Petain signed an armistice with Nazi Germany in June 1940, de Gaulle fled to London, where he organized the Free French forces and rallied French colonies to the Allied cause. His forces fought successfully in North Africa, and in June 1944 he was named head of the French government in exile.
  • 1963 --- Governor George Wallace vowed to defy an injunction that ordered the integration of the University of Alabama.
  • 1967 --- Bob Dylan's instant reaction to the recently completed album Paul McCartney brought by his London hotel room for a quick listen in the spring of 1967 may not sound like the most thoughtful analysis ever offered, but it still to hit the nail on the head. "Oh I get it," Dylan said to Paul on hearing Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band for the first time, "you don't want to be cute anymore." In time, the Beatles' eighth studio album would come to be regarded by many as the greatest in the history of rock and roll, and oceans of ink would be spilt in praising and analyzing its revolutionary qualities. But what Bob Dylan picked up on immediately was its meaning to the Beatles themselves, who turned a critical corner in their career with the release of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band on this day in 1967. Writing in The Times of London in 1967, the critic Kenneth Tynan called the release of Sgt. Pepper "a decisive moment in the history of Western civilization," but 30 years later, Paul McCartney called it a decisive moment of a more personal nature. "We were not boys, we were men," is how he summed up the Beatles' mindset as they gave up live performance and set about defining themselves purely as a studio band. "All that boy [stuff], all that screaming, we didn't want any more," McCartney said. "There was now more to it." With Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, the Beatles announced their intention to be seen "as artists rather than just performers." Sgt. Pepper is often cited as the first "concept album," and as the inspiration for other great pop stars of the 60s, from the Stones and the Beach Boys to Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye, to reach for new heights of creativity. For the Beatles themselves, 1967 marked not just a new creative peak, but also the beginning of a three-year period in which the group recorded and released an astonishing five original studio albums, including two—1968's The Beatles (a.k.a. "The White Album") and 1969's Abbey Road—that occupy the 10th and 14th spots, respectively, on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the Greatest Albums of All Time. Also in the top 15 on that list are Rubber Soul (1965) at #5, Revolver (1966) at #3 and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band at #1.
  • 1969 --- John Lennon and Yoko Ono recorded "Give Peace a Chance" with Derek Taylor, Murray the K, Tommy and Dick Smothers, and Timothy Leary.
  • 1980 --- CNN (Cable News Network), the world's first 24-hour television news network, makes its debut. The network signed on at 6 p.m. EST from its headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, with a lead story about the attempted assassination of civil rights leader Vernon Jordan. CNN went on to change the notion that news could only be reported at fixed times throughout the day. At the time of CNN's launch, TV news was dominated by three major networks--ABC, CBS and NBC--and their nightly 30-minute broadcasts. Initially available in less than two million U.S. homes, today CNN is seen in more than 89 million American households and over 160 million homes internationally. CNN was the brainchild of Robert "Ted" Turner, a colorful, outspoken businessman dubbed the "Mouth of the South." Turner was born on November 19, 1938, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and as a child moved with his family to Georgia, where his father ran a successful billboard advertising company. After his father committed suicide in 1963, Turner took over the business and expanded it. In 1970, he bought a failing Atlanta TV station that broadcast old movies and network reruns and within a few years Turner had transformed it into a "superstation," a concept he pioneered, in which the station was beamed by satellite into homes across the country. Turner later bought the Atlanta Braves baseball team and the Atlanta Hawks basketball team and aired their games on his network, TBS (Turner Broadcasting System). In 1977, Turner gained international fame when he sailed his yacht to victory in the prestigious America's Cup race. In its first years of operation, CNN lost money and was ridiculed as the Chicken Noodle Network. However, Turner continued to invest in building up the network's news bureaus around the world and in 1983, he bought Satellite News Channel, owned in part by ABC, and thereby eliminated CNN's main competitor. CNN eventually came to be known for covering live events around the world as they happened, often beating the major networks to the punch. The network gained significant traction with its live coverage of the Persian Gulf War in 1991 and the network's audience grew along with the increasing popularity of cable television during the 1990s. In 1996, CNN merged with Time Warner, which merged with America Online four years later. Today, Ted Turner is an environmentalist and peace activist whose philanthropic efforts include a 1997 gift of $1 billion to the United Nations.
  • 1987 --- Knuckleballer Phil Niekro won game number 314 by leading the Cleveland Indians to a 9-6 win over the Detroit Tigers. The victory also brought Phil and his brother, Joe, to a total of 531 career wins, breaking the record set by the Perry brothers.
  • Birthdays
  • Marilyn Monroe
  • Morgan Freeman
  • Alanis Morissette
  • Ron Wood
  • Pat Boone
  • Andy Griffith
  • Jonathan Pryce
  • Heidi Klum
  • Rene Auberjonois
  • Powers Boothe
  • Brigham Young
  • Nelson Riddle
  • Cleavon Little
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