9:12am

Fri November 2, 2012
KALW Almanac

Friday November 2, 2012

  • 307th Day of 2012 / 59 Remaining
  • 49 Days Until The First Day of Winter
  • Sunrise:7:37
  • Sunset:6:10
  • 10 Hours 33 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise: 9:03pm
  • Moon Set:11:00am
  • Moon’s Phase: 86 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • November 28 @ 6:47 am
  • Full Beaver Moon
  • Full Frosts Moon

For both the colonists and the Algonquin tribes, this was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. This full Moon was also called the Frost Moon.

  • Tides
  • High: 8:00am/7:52pm
  • Low: 1:10am/2:06pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:1.61
  • Last Year:1.49
  • Normal To Date:1.59
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • National Deviled Egg Day
  • National Traffic Directors Day
  • Plan Your Epitaph Day
  • Admission Day-North Dakota
  • Admission Day-South Dakota
  • All Souls' Day -Catholic
  • Day(s) of the Dead/Dia(s) De Los Muertos-Mexico
  • On This Day In …
  • 1889 --- North and South Dakota were admitted to the Union; the first time that two states simultaneously became a part of the United States. President Benjamin Harrison had a problem with admitting the two states on the same day. Which one would be first? He decided it was easier to mix up the admissions papers so no one would know and just list the states alphabetically. That’s why North Dakota is the 39th and South Dakota is the 40th of the United States of America. The Dakotas took their name from the Sioux Indian word for ’ally’, although the settlers and the Sioux weren’t always allies (Battle of Wounded Knee). Those searching for a route to the Pacific Ocean settled in South Dakota, Ft. Pierre being the first permanent white settlement. Pierre remains the capital of South Dakota. Bismarck is the capital of North Dakota. Both states are still essentially rural and agricultural. The western meadowlark and the ring-necked pheasant, the North and South Dakota state birds, respectively, still fly over the vast meadowlands. North Dakota’s flower is the wild prairie rose, while the pasque flower holds that title in South Dakota. North Dakota, home of several major air bases and intercontinental ballistic missile sites, is known as the Peace Garden State, while its more southern counterpart is called the Coyote State.
  • 1721 --- Peter the Great (Peter I), ruler of Russia, changed his title to emperor.
  • 1917 --- British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour expressed support for a national home for the Jews of Palestine in what became known as the Balfour Declaration.
  • 1921 --- Peter the Great (Peter I), ruler of Russia, changed his title to emperor.
  • 1929 --- Newsreel Theatre opened. The newsreel films were shown at the Embassy Theatre, 1560 Broadway, between 46th and 47th Streets in New York City. This first all-newsreel theatre in the United States also holds the distinction of being the first, and we might add, only movie theater in the U.S. to have had an all-female management and staff (1925). In 1987, the Embassy Theatre was designated as a city landmark, and in 1998 it became Times Square’s Visitor Center.
  • 1930 --- Haile Selassie was crowned emperor of Ethiopia.
  • 1947 --- The Hughes Flying Boat—the largest aircraft ever built—is piloted by designer Howard Hughes on its first and only flight. Built with laminated birch and spruce, the massive wooden aircraft had a wingspan longer than a football field and was designed to carry more than 700 men to battle. Howard Hughes was a successful Hollywood movie producer when he founded the Hughes Aircraft Company in 1932. He personally tested cutting-edge aircraft of his own design and in 1937 broke the transcontinental flight-time record. In 1938, he flew around the world in a record three days, 19 hours, and 14 minutes. Following the U.S. entrance into World War II in 1941, the U.S. government commissioned the Hughes Aircraft Company to build a large flying boat capable of carrying men and materials over long distances. The concept for what would become the "Spruce Goose" was originally conceived by the industrialist Henry Kaiser, but Kaiser dropped out of the project early, leaving Hughes and his small team to make the H-4 a reality. Because of wartime restrictions on steel, Hughes decided to build his aircraft out of wood laminated with plastic and covered with fabric. Although it was constructed mainly of birch, the use of spruce (along with its white-gray color) would later earn the aircraft the nickname Spruce Goose. It had a wingspan of 320 feet and was powered by eight giant propeller engines.Development of the Spruce Goose cost a phenomenal $23 million and took so long that the war had ended by the time of its completion in 1946. The aircraft had many detractors, and Congress demanded that Hughes prove the plane airworthy. On November 2, 1947, Hughes obliged, taking the H-4 prototype out into Long Beach Harbor, CA for an unannounced flight test. Thousands of onlookers had come to watch the aircraft taxi on the water and were surprised when Hughes lifted his wooden behemoth 70 feet above the water and flew for a mile before landing. Despite its successful maiden flight, the Spruce Goose never went into production, primarily because critics alleged that its wooden framework was insufficient to support its weight during long flights. Nevertheless, Howard Hughes, who became increasingly eccentric and withdrawn after 1950, refused to neglect what he saw as his greatest achievement in the aviation field. From 1947 until his death in 1976, he kept the Spruce Goose prototype ready for flight in an enormous, climate-controlled hangar at a cost of $1 million per year. Today, the Spruce Goose is housed at the Evergreen Aviation Museum in McMinnville, Oregon.
  • 1948 --- When Harry S Truman went to bed this day, he was losing the election for president of the United States (to Thomas E. Dewey). Chicago Daily Tribune printers were out on strike and getting the newspaper to readers was no simple task. To make a long story short, the editors had to guess at the outcome of the election and picked/printed the wrong person to win. Upon arising the next morning, Truman learned he had won. On a short train stop in St. Louis, he stepped onto the back platform of the train and was presented with one of the newspapers with the infamous headline, “DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN”. It was at that moment that the famous photo of Truman holding up the paper was taken. When asked to comment, Truman said “This is for the books.”
  • 1959 --- Charles Van Doren admitted to a House subcommittee that he had the questions and answers in advance of his appearances on the TV game show "Twenty-One."
  • 1960 --- A landmark obscenity case over Lady Chatterley's Lover, by D.H. Lawrence, ends in the acquittal of Penguin Books. The publisher had been sued for obscenity in publishing an unexpurgated version of Lawrence's novel, which deals with the affair between the wife of a wealthy, paralyzed landowner and his estate's gamekeeper. The book had been published in a limited English-language edition in Florence in 1928 and Paris the following year. An expurgated version was published in England in 1932. In 1959, the full text was published in New York, then in London the following year.
  • 1976 --- Former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter was the first president from the Deep South since 1844. Elected this day, Carter was supported by four out of every five African Americans who voted. He also did well with whites in the South and Americans on low incomes. He quickly made good election promises to pardon Vietnam War draft evaders and to end the production of the expensive B-1 bomber. Carter also set out to limit aid to those governments guilty of human rights violations.
  • 1978 --- The largest squid ever caught was taken in Thimble Tickle Bay, Newfoundland. It was 55 feet long and weighed two tons.
  • 1983 --- U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed a bill establishing a federal holiday on the third Monday of January in honor of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
  • 2010 --- Republicans won control of the House of Representatives, picking up 63 seats in midterm elections, while Democrats retained a majority in the Senate; Republican governors outnumbered Democrats after gaining six states.
  • Birthdays
  • Marie-Antoinette
  • Daniel Boone
  • Ray Walston
  • Earl “Speedo” Carroll-The Coasters
  • Warren Harding (29th President)
  • James Polk (11th President)
  • Daniel Boone
  • Burt Lancaster
  • Pat Buchanan
  • Shere Hite
  • J D Souther
  • kd Lang
  • Nelly
  • Gov Scott Walker
  • David Schwimmer
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