6:03am

Fri November 9, 2012
KALW Almanac

Friday November 9, 2012

1965 - Great Northeast Blackout (highlighted story below)
1965 - Great Northeast Blackout (highlighted story below)

  •   314th Day of 2012 / 42 Remaining
  • 32 Days Until The First Day of Winter
  • Sunrise:6:44
  • Sunset:5:03
  • 10 Hours 19 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise: 1:54am
  • Moon Set:2:15pm
  • Moon’s Phase: 22 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • November 28 @ 6:47 am
  • Full Beaver Moon
  • Full Frosts Moon

For both the colonists and the Algonquin tribes, this was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. This full Moon was also called the Frost Moon.

  • Tides
  • High: 8:00am/7:52pm
  • Low: 1:10am/2:06pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:1.79
  • Last Year:1.90
  • Normal To Date:2.21
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • National Scrapple Day
  • Independence Day-Cambodia
  • On This Day In …
  • 1857 --- Readers picked up a new magazine on newsstands. The Atlantic Monthly featured the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.
  • 1875 --- Indian Inspector E.C. Watkins submits a report to Washington, D.C., stating that hundreds of Sioux and Cheyenne Indians associated with Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse are hostile to the United States In so doing, Watkins set into motion a series of events that led to the Battle of the Little Big Horn in Montana the following year. Seven years before the Watkins report, a portion of the Teton Sioux, who lived with Chief Red Cloud, made peace with the U.S. in exchange for a large reservation in the Black Hills of the Dakotas. However, some Sioux refused the offer of confinement on a reservation, and instead united around Chief Sitting Bull and his leading warrior, Crazy Horse. The wisdom of their resistance seemed confirmed in 1874 when the discovery of gold in the Black Hills set off an invasion of Anglo miners into the Sioux reservation. When the U.S. did nothing to stop this illegal violation of lands promised to the Sioux by treaty, more Indians left the reservation in disgust and joined Sitting Bull to hunt buffalo on the plains of Wyoming and Montana. In November 1875, Watkins reported that the free-roaming Indians were hostile. The government responded by ordering that the Indians "be informed that they must remove to a reservation before the 31st of January, 1876," and promised that if they refused, "they would be turned over to the War Department for punishment." However, by the time couriers carried the message to the Sioux it was already winter, and traveling 200 miles to the reservation across frozen ground with no grass for their ponies or food for themselves was an impossible request. When, as expected, the Sioux missed the deadline, the matter was turned over to the War Department. In March 1876, the former Civil War hero General Phillip Sheridan ordered a large force of soldiers to trap the Sioux and force them back to the reservations. Among the officers leading the force was George Armstrong Custer, who later that year lead his famous "last stand" against Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse at the Battle of Little Big Horn.
  • 1911 --- Georges Claude of Paris, France applied for a patent on neon advertising signs. You may have seen his handiwork for advertisers that appeared at various times on the Eiffel Tower.
  • 1923 --- In Munich, the Beer Hall Putsch was crushed by German troops that were loyal to the democratic government. The event began the evening before when Adolf Hitler took control of a beer hall full of Bavarian government leaders at gunpoint.
  • 1935 --- United Mine Workers president John L. Lewis and other labor leaders formed the Committee for Industrial Organization.
  • 1938 --- German Nazis launch a campaign of terror against Jewish people and their homes and businesses in Germany and Austria. The violence, which continued through November 10 and was later dubbed "Kristallnacht," or "Night of Broken Glass," after the countless smashed windows of Jewish-owned establishments, left approximately 100 Jews dead, 7,500 Jewish businesses damaged and hundreds of synagogues, homes, schools and graveyards vandalized. An estimated 30,000 Jewish men were arrested, many of whom were then sent to concentration camps for several months; they were released when they promised to leave Germany. Kristallnacht represented a dramatic escalation of the campaign started by Adolf Hitler in 1933 when he became chancellor to purge Germany of its Jewish population.
  • 1965 --- At dusk, the biggest power failure in U.S. history occurs as all of New York state, portions of seven neighboring states, and parts of eastern Canada are plunged into darkness. The Great Northeast Blackout began at the height of rush hour, delaying millions of commuters, trapping 800,000 people in New York's subways, and stranding thousands more in office buildings, elevators, and trains. Ten thousand National Guardsmen and 5,000 off-duty policemen were called into service to prevent looting. The blackout was caused by the tripping of a 230-kilovolt transmission line near Ontario, Canada, at 5:16 p.m., which caused several other heavily loaded lines also to fail. This precipitated a surge of power that overwhelmed the transmission lines in western New York, causing a "cascading" tripping of additional lines, resulting in the eventual breakup of the entire Northeastern transmission network. All together, 30 million people in eight U.S. states and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec were affected by the blackout. During the night, power was gradually restored to the blacked-out areas, and by morning power had been restored throughout the Northeast.
  • 1967 --- The first issue of Rolling Stone was published. John Lennon was on the cover. The magazine said it was not simply a music magazine but was also about “...the things and attitudes that music embraces.”
  • 1984 --- Three Servicemen, a sculpture by Frederick Hart, was unveiled in Washington, DC. It was the final addition to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The statue faces the wall of names of more than 58,000 Americans who were either killed or reported missing in action during the Vietnam War.
  • 1989 --- East German officials today opened the Berlin Wall, allowing travel from East to West Berlin. The following day, celebrating Germans began to tear the wall down. One of the ugliest and most infamous symbols of the Cold War was soon reduced to rubble that was quickly snatched up by souvenir hunters. The East German action followed a decision by Hungarian officials a few weeks earlier to open the border between Hungary and Austria. This effectively ended the purpose of the Berlin Wall, since East German citizens could now circumvent it by going through Hungary, into Austria, and thence into West Germany. The decision to open the wall was also a reflection of the immense political changes taking place in East Germany, where the old communist leadership was rapidly losing power and the populace was demanding free elections and movement toward a free market system. The action also had an impact on President George Bush and his advisors. After watching television coverage of the delirious German crowds demolishing the wall, many in the Bush administration became more convinced than ever that Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's statements about desiring a new relationship with the West must be taken more seriously. Unlike 1956 and 1968, when Soviet forces ruthlessly crushed protests in Hungary and Czechoslovakia, respectively, Gorbachev actually encouraged the East German action. As such, the destruction of the Berlin Wall was one of the most significant actions leading to the end of the Cold War.
  • 1990 --- "We try to work with taxpayers," Internal Revenue Service spokeswoman Valerie Thornton told The New York Times in the autumn of 1991, "[a]nd if we have to come up with some creative payment plan, that's what we're going to do, because it's in everyone's best interest." The creative payment plan to which Ms. Thornton was referring in her statement to the Times involved a unique revenue-sharing agreement negotiated between the IRS and the beloved country singer Willie Nelson, who was then struggling to repay a $16.7 million dollar tax debt that had led the federal government to seize all of his assets one year earlier, on this day in 1990 Willie Nelson landed himself in tax trouble as a result of investments he made in the early 1980s in a tax shelter later ruled illegal by the IRS. With interest and penalties on top of his original unpaid taxes, Nelson was facing a tax bill in excess of $16 million, and though his lawyers convinced the IRS to accept a $6 million cash payment to settle the entire debt, even this was more than Nelson was able to pay, despite being perhaps the most bankable country-music star of the day. "He didn't have $1 million—he probably didn't have $30,000," his daughter, Lana Nelson, told Texas Monthly magazine of her famously generous and free-spending father. In anticipation of negotiations with the IRS breaking down, Willie Nelson had his daughter remove his beloved guitar, Trigger, from his Texas home and ship it to him in Hawaii, where he was golfing when the feds raided his home on November 9, 1990. "As long as I got my guitar," Willie Nelson said, "I'll be fine." Ultimately, Nelson did get to keep his guitar and even got his Texas ranch back, but not before the government auctioned his home to the highest bidder in January 1991. That bidder, however, was a Nelson fan who purchased the ranch at the behest of a group of farmers who threw their support behind Nelson in thanks for his work in organizing the Farm Aid charitable concerts.  In June 1991, Nelson released a compilation album entitled The IRS Tapes: Who'll Buy My Memories?, the first and perhaps last major-label record album ever released under a strict revenue-sharing agreement with the Internal Revenue Service. While the revenues generated by The IRS Tapes did not come close to settling the debt on its own, Nelson did manage to retire his debt to the federal government by 1993.
  • 2011 --- Penn State fired longtime head football coach Joe Paterno and university president Graham Spanier over their handling of child sex abuse allegations against former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.
  • Birthdays
  • Elijah Lovejoy
  • Anne Sexton
  • Ed Wynn
  • Dorothy Dandridge
  • Carl Sagan
  • Whitey Herzog
  • Bob Gibson
  • Gail Borden
  • Pepa
  • Spiro Agnew
  • Claud Rains
  • Hedy Lamarr
  • Mary Travers
  • Tom Fogerty
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