5:06am

Mon January 9, 2012
KALW ALMANAC

Monday January 9, 2012

  • 9th Day of 2012 / 357 Remaining
  • 71 Days Until Spring Begins
  • Sunrise:7:25
  • Sunset:5:09
  • 9 Hr 46 Min
  • Moon Rise:5:59pm
  • Moon Set:7:31am
  • Moon’s Phase: 100 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • January 8 @ 11:32pm
  • Full Wolf Moon
  • Full Old Moon

Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside Indian villages. Thus, the name for January’s full Moon. Sometimes it was also referred to as the Old Moon, or the Moon After Yule. Some called it the Full Snow Moon, but most tribes applied that name to the next Moon.

  • Tides
  • High:10:02am
  • Low:4:14am/5:02pm
  • Rainfall
  • This Year:3.37
  • Last Year:12.20
  • Year To Date Average:9.33
  • Annual Average: 22.28
  • Holidays
  • National Apricot Day
  • Balloon Ascension Day/Aviation in America Day
  • National Static Cling Day
  • National Clean Off Your Desk Day
  • National Stuffed Animal Laundry Day
  • Martyr’s Day-Panama
  • On This Day In History
  • 1776 --- Thomas Paine publishes his pamphlet "Common Sense," setting forth his arguments in favor of American independence.  Although little used today, pamphlets were an important medium for the spread of ideas in the 16th through 19th centuries. Originally published anonymously, "Common Sense" advocated independence for the American colonies from Britain and is considered one of the most influential pamphlets in American history.  Credited with uniting average citizens and political leaders behind the idea of independence, "Common Sense" played a remarkable role in transforming a colonial squabble into the American Revolution. At the time Paine wrote "Common Sense," most colonists considered themselves to be aggrieved Britons.  Paine fundamentally changed the tenor of colonists' argument with the crown when he wrote the following:  "Europe, and not England, is the parent country of America.  This new world hath been the asylum for the persecuted lovers of civil and religious liberty from every part of Europe.  Hither they have fled, not from the tender embraces of the mother, but from the cruelty of the monster; and it is so far true of England, that the same tyranny which drove the first emigrants from home, pursues their descendants still."
  • 1788 --- Beside a long tidal river or in American Indian-speak, Quinnehtukqut, is Connecticut, the state that entered the United States of America this day. Hartford, the capital of Connecticut ... and of the insurance industry ... boasts having the oldest newspaper, "Hartford Courant", which has been publishing since 1764. Many of the state’s symbols have been there as long, if not longer: state fossil: eubrontes giganteus; bird: American robin; flower: mountain laurel; tree: white oak; animal: sperm whale; mineral: garnet; shellfish: Eastern oyster; insect: praying mantis; hero: Nathan Hale. Other symbols came later: song: "Yankee Doodle" and ship: USS Nautilus. Nicknamed the Nutmeg State, Connecticut, the fifth state, also has an official designation: the Constitution State. Easy to figure out: In the 1630s, the English settlements along the tidal river gathered together to form the Connecticut Colony and wrote the first constitution in the new world, "Fundamental Orders". Connecticut’s motto: He who transplanted still sustains, or in Latin-speak: Qui transtulit sustinet.
  • 1793 --- Jean-Pierre Blanchard made the first successful balloon flight in the United States. Blanchard’s balloon, filled with hydrogen, took off from Philadelphia, PA, soared to 5,800 feet and eventually wound up some 15 miles away, in Woodbury, New Jersey. President George Washington was in Philadelphia for the event, along with Thomas Jefferson, Henry Clay, Paul Revere, John Adams and other bigwigs. Just before takeoff, the President slipped Blanchard a note. Just what do you thing was in that mysterious note? The letter was intended to allay the fears and suspicions of local farmers who saw Blanchard drop out of the sky.
  • 1959 --- CBS-TV premiered Rawhide, starring newcomer Clint Eastwood as Rowdy Yates, Eric Fleming as Gil Favor, Sheb Wooley as Pete Nolan, and Paul Bringar as Wishbone. The western lasted 7½ seasons.
  • 1965 --- The Beatles’ Beatles ’65 was the number-one album in the U.S. for the first of nine straight weeks (thru Mar 6). The tracks were: No Reply, I’m a Loser, Baby’s in Black, Rock and Roll Music, I’ll Follow the Sun, Mr. Moonlight, Honey Don’t, I’ll Be Back, She’s a Woman, I Feel Fine, and Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby.
  • 1969 --- “I Heard It Through The Grapevine" by Marvin Gaye is #1 on the charts.
  • 1972 --- Reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes, speaking to reporters by telephone from the Bahamas, said a purported biography of him by Clifford Irving was a fake. Irving and his wife had received a $750,000 advance from the McGraw-Hill publishing house for the book. Clifford Irving was eventually imprisoned and ordered to repay the advance, plus damages.
  • 1977 --- Super Bowl XI (at Pasadena): Oakland Raiders 32, Minnesota Vikings 14. John Matuszak and the Raiders defense kept Vikings QB Fran Tarkenton busy all day. MVP: Raiders’ WR Fred Biletnikoff. Tickets: $20.00.
  • 1987 --- The White House released a memorandum prepared for President Ronald Reagan in January 1986 that showed a definite link between U.S. arms sales to Iran and the release of American hostages in Lebanon.
  • 2004 --- Archaeologists announced they'd found five more chambers in the tomb of Qin Shihuang, China's first emperor. The rooms were believed to cover 750,000 square feet.
  • Birthdays
  • Richard M Nixon (37th President)
  • Judith Krantz
  • Joan Baez
  • Simone De Beauvoir
  • Fernando Lamas
  • Herbert Lom
  • Dave Matthews
  • Jimmy Page
  • David Johansen
  • Bob Denver
  • Jimmy Boyd
  • J K Simmons
  • Dick Enberg
  • Bart Starr
  • Crystal Gayle
  • Chic Young
  • Kenny Clarke
  • Gypsy Rose Lee
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