6:12am

Mon June 18, 2012
KALW ALMANAC

Monday June 18, 2012

  • 170th Day of 2012 / 196 Remaining
  • 2 Days Until Summer Begins
  • Sunrise:5:48
  • Sunset:8:35
  • 14 Hours 47 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:5:06am
  • Moon Set:7:59pm
  • Moon’s Phase: 1 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • June 3 @ 11:51am
  • Full Buck Moon
  • Full Thunder Moon
  • Full Hay Moon

July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. It was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, for the reason that thunderstorms are most frequent during this time. Another name for this month’s Moon was the Full Hay Moon.

  • Tides
  • High:12:14pm/10:29pm
  • Low:5:10am/4:45pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:15.80
  • Last Year:28.51
  • Normal To Date:23.80
  • Annual Seasonal Average: 23.80
  • Holidays
  • National Splurge Day
  • National Cherry Tart Day
  • Wild Den Dancing Day
  • International Sushi Day
  • World Juggling Day
  • Evacuation Day-Egypt
  • On This Day In …
  • 1812 --- The United States issued a declaration of war on Great Britain. And so began the War of 1812, prompted by Britain’s violations of America’s rights on the high seas and the involvement of the British in Indian uprisings on the frontiers.
  • 1815 --- At the Battle of Waterloo Napoleon was defeated by an international army under the Duke of Wellington.
  • 1873 --- Susan B. Anthony was fined $100 for trying to vote in the 1872 U.S. presidential election. She refused to pay the fine, but never was allowed to vote.
  • 1898 --- Atlantic City, NJ opened its Steel Pier (boardwalk). The world-famous Steel Pier had 9 miles of food, beverages, concessions, amusements, concerts, etc. Ed McMahon, of the Johnny Carson Show and Publisher's Clearing House fame, was a barker on the pier in his youth.
  • 1923 --- The first Checker Cab rolls off the line at the Checker Cab Manufacturing Company in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Morris Markin, founder of Checker Cab, was born in Smolensk, Russia, and began working when he was only 12 years old. At 19, he immigrated to the United States and moved to Chicago, where two uncles lived. After opening his own tailor's shop, Markin also began running a fleet of cabs and an auto body shop, the Markin Auto Body Corporation, in Joliet, Illinois. In 1921, after loaning $15,000 to help a friend's struggling car manufacturing business, the Commonwealth Motor Company, Markin absorbed Commonwealth into his own enterprise and completely halted the production of regular passenger cars in favor of taxis. The result was the Checker Cab Manufacturing Company, which took its name from a Chicago cab company that had hired Commonwealth to produce its vehicles. By the end of 1922, Checker was producing more than 100 units per month in Joliet, and some 600 of the company's cabs were on the streets of New York City. Markin went looking for a bigger factory and settled on Kalamazoo, where the company took over buildings previously used by the Handley-Knight Company and Dort Body Plant car manufacturers. The first shipment of a Checker from Kalamazoo on June 18, 1923 stood out as a major landmark in the history of the company, which by then employed some 700 people. During the Great Depression, Markin briefly sold Checker, but he bought it back in 1936 and began diversifying his business by making auto parts for other car companies. After converting its factories to produce war materiel during World War II, Checker entered the passenger car market in the late 1950s, with models dubbed the Superba and the Marathon. In its peak production year of 1962, Checker rolled out some 8,173 cars; the great majority of those were taxis. Over the course of the 1970s, however, as economic conditions led taxi companies to convert smaller, more fuel-efficient standard passenger cars into cabs, the 4,000-pound gas-guzzling Checker came to seem more and more outdated. Markin had died in 1970, and in April 1982 his son David announced that Checker would halt production of its famous cab that summer. Though the company still owns the Yellow and Checker cab fleets in Chicago and continued to make parts for other auto manufacturers, including General Motors, the last Checker Cab rolled off the line in Kalamazoo on July 12, 1982.
  • 1927 --- The U.S. Post Office offered a special 10-cent postage stamp for sale. The stamp honored Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis. It was the first postage stamp to feature the name of a living American.
  • 1928 --- Aviator Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean as she completed a flight from Newfoundland to Wales in about 21 hours.
  • 1948 --- Columbia Records publicly unveiled its new long-playing phonograph record in New York. It played at 33 and 1/3 revolutions per minute.
  • 1948 --- The United Nations Commission on Human Rights adopted its International Declaration of Human Rights.
  • 1961 --- Gunsmoke was broadcast for the last time on CBS radio. The show had been on for nine years. It was called the first adult Western. The star of Gunsmoke was William Conrad, who would become a major TV star (Cannon, Jake and the Fatman), as well. When Gunsmoke moved to TV, James Arness filled Conrad’s boots.
  • 1967 --- By the time they got to Woodstock, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, the Who and the Grateful Dead were established superstars—heroes to the roughly half a million worshipful fans who trekked up to Max Yasgur's farm to see them in the summer of 1969. Yet just two years earlier, they were entirely unknown to most of those worshipers. All four iconic figures on the 1960s music scene entered the American popular consciousness at an event that preceded and provided the inspiration for Woodstock itself: the Monterey Pop Festival. Held over three days during the height of the Summer of Love, the Monterey Pop Festival came to a close on this day in 1967, with a lineup of performers that included all of the aforementioned acts as well as Ravi Shankar, Buffalo Springfield and the Mamas and the Papas. From a purely musical perspective, the Monterey Pop Festival was a groundbreaking event, bringing together nearly three dozen well-known and unknown acts representing an eclectic mix of styles and sounds. The great soul singer Otis Redding, the Indian sitar master Ravi Shankar and South African singer/trumpeter Hugh Masekala, for instance, all had their first significant exposure to a primarily white American audience at the Monterey Pop Festival, which also featured such well-known acts as the Animals, the Association, the Byrds, Jefferson Airplane and the Mamas and the Papas. In this sense, the festival not only pioneered the basic idea of a large-scale, multi-day rock festival, but it also provided the creative template that such festivals still follow to this day.
  • 1972 --- Newspapers around the country, including The Washington Post, reported a burglary. The story took up nothing more than a couple of inches of copy, buried inside the paper and out of sight of the day’s top news stories. The burglary, on the 6th floor of a plush Washington, D.C. apartment and office complex called the Watergate, would later drive President Richard M. Nixon from the White House. The growing story became a Pulitzer Prize-winner for journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.
  • 1983 --- Dr. Sally Ride became the first American woman in space, beginning her ride aboard the space shuttle Challenger for a six-day Odyssey.
  • 1984 --- Talk radio icon Alan Berg, the self-described "man you love to hate," is gunned down and killed instantly in the driveway of his home in Denver, Colorado, on this day in 1984. The 50-year-old host, whose show on the station KOA gained a strong following in the early 1980s, stirred up controvesy with his outspoken personality, abrasive approach and liberal views. He had already been the target of a steady stream of death threats. One of the suspects in Berg's murder, Bruce Pierce—leader of a neo-Nazi organization called the Order—was arrested nearly a year later in Georgia, driving a van that contained machine guns, grenades, dynamite, and a crossbow. His right-wing extremist group had been linked to many armored-car robberies in the West.
  • 1990 --- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that singer Jett Williams was the daughter of and a legal heir to the estate of singer Hank Williams Senior.
  • 1993 --- So-called 'killer bees,' Africanized honey bees, have reached Tucson, Arizona; a small dog was killed from a bee attack. Their original source was Brazil, where African bees were imported for experimental cross breeding.
  • 1996 --- Benjamin Netanyahu was sworn in (following Knesset approval) as Israel’s 9th Prime Minister. Netanyahu, the first prime minister born after the establishment of Israel, was elected May 29. His Likud-Party government lasted just under three years. He was defeated by the Labor Party’s leader, Ehud Barak, May 17, 1999.
  • Birthdays
  • M.C. Escher
  • Robert Mondavi
  • Sir Paul McCartney
  • Alison Moyet
  • Roger Ebert
  • Lou Brock
  • Isabella Rossellini
  • Sen. Jay Rockefeller
  • Anastasia
  • Jeanette MacDonald
  • Samuel Cahn
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