5:29am

Mon September 24, 2012
KALW Almanac

Monday Septemebr 24, 2012

  • 268th Day of 2012 / 98 Remaining
  • 88 Days Until The First Day of Winter
  • Sunrise:7:00
  • Sunset:7:03
  • 12 Hours 3 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:3:47pm
  • Moon Set:1:28am
  • Moon’s Phase: 71 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • September 29 @ 8:18pm
  • Full Corn Moon
  • Full Harvest Moon
  • This full moon’s name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was  supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon, which is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering.
  • Tides
  • High:7:49am/6:51pm
  • Low:12:45am/1:06pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:0.03
  • Last Year:0.11
  • Normal To Date:0.00
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • AKC Responsible Dog Ownership Day
  • Family Health and Fitness Day - USA
  • Fish Amnesty Day
  • Innergize Day
  • National Hunting and Fishing Day
  • National Public Lands Day
  • National Punctuation Day
  • R.E.A.D. in America Day
  • Schwenkfelder Thanksgiving-Pa.
  • National Cherries Jubilee Day
  • Family Day-A Day to Eat Dinner with your Children
  • Birthday of Confucius-China
  • Constitutional Declaration Day-Cambodia
  • Heritage Day-South Africa
  • Independence Day-Guinea-Bissau
  • Manit Day-Marshall Islands
  • On This Day In …
  • 1789 --- The Judiciary Act of 1789 is passed by Congress and signed by President George Washington, establishing the Supreme Court of the United States as a tribunal made up of six justices who were to serve on the court until death or retirement. That day, President Washington nominated John Jay to preside as chief justice, and John Rutledge, William Cushing, John Blair, Robert Harrison, and James Wilson to be associate justices. On September 26, all six appointments were confirmed by the U.S. Senate.
  • 1869 --- Thousands of businessmen were financially ruined after a panic on Wall Street. The panic was caused by an attempt to corner the gold market by Jay Gould and James Fisk.
  • 1890 --- Faced with the eminent destruction of their church and way of life, Mormon leaders reluctantly issue the "Mormon Manifesto" in which they command all Latter-day Saints to uphold the anti-polygamy laws of the nation. The Mormon leaders had been given little choice: If they did not abandon polygamy they faced federal confiscation of their sacred temples and the revocation of basic civil rights for all Mormons.
  • 1933 --- "Roses and Drums" was heard on WABC in New York City. It was the first dramatic presentation for radio.
  • 1938 --- Tennis champion Don Budge won the U.S. Tennis Open at Forest Hills, NY. The win made Budge the first player to win all four major titles (he also had won the Australian Open, the French Open and the British Open).
  • 1955 --- Millions of Americans tuned in to watch Judy Garland make her TV debut on the Ford Star Jubilee. The CBS show received the highest television ratings to that time.
  • 1957 --- The Brooklyn Dodgers played their last game at Ebbets Field before moving to Los Angeles for the next season.
  • 1961 --- Bullwinkle J. Moose and his friend, Rocket J. (Rocky) Squirrel, were seen in prime time for the first time on NBC-TV. The Sunday night cartoon (7-7:30 p.m.) was called The Bullwinkle Show. Originally Bullwinkle and Rocky appeared on ABC in a weekday afternoon series, Rocky and His Friends.
  • 1964 --- President Lyndon B. Johnson receives a special commission's report on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, which had occurred on November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas. Since the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, was killed by a man named Jack Ruby almost immediately after murdering Kennedy, Oswald's motive for assassinating the president remained unknown. Seven days after the assassination, Johnson appointed the President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy to investigate Kennedy's death. The commission was led by Chief Justice Earl Warren and became known as the Warren Commission. It concluded that Oswald had acted alone and that the Secret Service had made poor preparations for JFK's visit to Dallas and had failed to sufficiently protect him. The circumstances surrounding Kennedy's death, however, have since given rise to several conspiracy theories involving such disparate characters as the Mafia, Cuban exiles, military leaders and even Lyndon Johnson. The Warren Commission's conclusion that Oswald was a "lone gunman" failed to satisfy some who witnessed the attack and others whose research found conflicting details in the commission's report. Critics of the Warren Commission's report believed that additional ballistics experts' conclusions and a home movie shot at the scene disputed the theory that three bullets fired from Oswald's gun could have caused Kennedy's fatal wounds as well as the injuries to Texas Governor John Connally, who was riding with the president in an open car as it traveled through Dallas' Dealey Plaza that fateful day. So persistent was the controversy that another congressional investigation was conducted in 1979.
  • 1968 --- The longest-running newsmagazine on television began on CBS-TV. 60 Minutes started on this, a Tuesday, night in 1968. During its first three years on the tube, 60 Minutes ran on an alternate-week schedule with CBS News Hour, moving to Sundays (all by itself) in early 1972. 60 Minutes debuted with two correspondents: Mike Wallace and Harry Reasoner.
  • 1969 --- The trial of the "Chicago Seven" begins before Judge Julius Hoffman. The defendants, including David Dellinger of the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam (MOBE); Rennie Davis and Tom Hayden of MOBE and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS); and Jerry Rubin and Abbie Hoffman of the Youth International Party (Yippies), were accused of conspiring to incite a riot at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. At the height of the antiwar and civil rights movements, these young leftists had organized protest marches and rock concerts at the Democratic National Convention. During the event, clashes broke out between the protesters and the police and eventually turned into full-scale rioting, complete with tear gas and police beatings. The press, already there to cover the Democratic convention, denounced the overreaction by police and Chicago Mayor Richard Daley's handling of the situation. The Chicago Seven were indicted for violating the Rap Brown law, which had been tagged onto the Civil Rights Bill earlier that year by conservative senators. The law made it illegal to cross state lines in order to riot or to conspire to use interstate commerce to incite rioting. President Johnson's attorney general, Ramsey Clark, refused to prosecute the case. Although Bobby Seale of the Black Panthers was originally a defendant in the trial as well, he angrily denounced Judge Hoffman as a racist for denying his request for a separate trial. He wanted to be represented by his own lawyer, who was recovering from surgery at the time, so he loudly protested by attempting to examine his own witnesses. Judge Hoffman took the unusual measure of having Seale bound and gagged at the defendant's table before eventually separating his trial and sentencing him to 48 months in prison. With encouragement from defense attorney William Kunstler, the seven other defendants did whatever they could to disrupt the trial through such acts as reading poetry and chanting Hare Krishna. While the jury was deliberating their verdict, Judge Hoffman held the defendants in contempt of court for their behavior and sentenced them to up to 29 months in jail. Kunstler received a four-year sentence, partly for calling Hoffman's court a "medieval torture chamber." Five of the Chicago Seven were convicted of lesser charges. In 1970, the convictions and contempt charges against the Chicago Seven were overturned on appeal. Abbie Hoffman remained a well-known counterculture activist until his death in 1989. Tom Hayden went on to marry actress Jane Fonda and is still a prominent liberal politician in California, currently married to actress Barbara Williams.
  • 1976 --- Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was sentenced to seven years in prison for her part in a 1974 bank robbery.
  • 1991 --- The album "Nevermind" by Nirvana was released.
  • 1996 --- The United States, represented by President Clinton, and the world's other major nuclear powers signed a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty to end all testing and development of nuclear weapons.
  • 2007 --- United Auto Workers walked off the job at GM plants in the first nationwide strike during auto contract negotiations since 1976. (A tentative pact ended the walkout two days later.)
  • Birthdays
  • Nia Vardalos
  • Gerry Marsden
  • Joseph Kennedy II
  • Stephen Bechte
  • Jim McKay
  • Linda McCartney
  • Phil Hartman
  • “Mean” Joe Greene
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Jim Henson
  • Rosa Lee Hawkins(Dixie Cups)
  • Justice John Marshall
  • Lou Dobbs
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