5:41am

Thu June 13, 2013
KALW Almanac

Thursday June 13, 2013

1971

  • 164th Day of 2013 / 205 Remaining
  • 8 Days Until The First Day of Summer
  • Sunrise:5:47
  • Sunset:8:32
  • 14 Hours 45 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:10:25am
  • Moon Set:11:47pm
  • Moon’s Phase: 22%
  • The Next Full Moon
  • June 23 @ 4:33am
  • Full Strawberry Moon
  • Full Rose Moon

The Strawberry Moon was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

  • Tides
  • High: 1:37am/3:46pm
  • Low: 8:33am/9:10pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • Normal To Date:23.75
  • This Year:16.36
  • Last Year:15.77
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • UN World Refugee Day
  • World Juggling Day
  • Flag Day-Argentina
  • Commemoration Day-Kyrgyzstan
  • On This Day In-
  • 1381 --- During the Peasants' Revolt, a large mob of English peasants led by Wat Tyler marches into London and begins burning and looting the city. Several government buildings were destroyed, prisoners were released, and a judge was beheaded along with several dozen other leading citizens. The Peasants' Revolt had its origins in a severe manifestation of bubonic plague in the late 1340s, which killed nearly a third of the population of England. The scarcity of labor brought on by the Black Death led to higher wages and a more mobile peasantry. Parliament, however, resisted these changes to its traditional feudal system and passed laws to hold down wages while encouraging landlords to reassert their ancient manorial rights. In 1380, peasant discontent reached a breaking point when Parliament restricted voting rights through an increase of the poll tax, and the Peasants' Revolt began. In Kent, a county in southeast England, the rebels chose Wat Tyler as their leader, and he led his growing "army" toward London, capturing the towns of Maidstone, Rochester, and Canterbury along the way. After he was denied a meeting with King Richard II, he led the rebels into London on June 13, 1381, burning and plundering the city. The next day, the 14-year-old king met with peasant leaders at Mile End and agreed to their demands to abolish serfdom and restrictions on the marketplace. However, fighting continued elsewhere at the same time, and Tyler led a peasant force against the Tower of London, capturing the fortress and executing the archbishop of Canterbury.
  • 1415 --- Henry the Navigator, the prince of Portugal, embarked on an expedition to Africa.
  • 1777 --- A 19-year-old French aristocrat, Marie-Joseph Paul Roch Yves Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, arrives in South Carolina with the intent to serve as General George Washington's second-in-command. Silas Deane, during his service as the Continental Congress envoy to France, had, on December 7, 1776, struck an agreement with Johann de Kalb and Lafayette to offer their military expertise to the American cause. However, Deane was replaced with Benjamin Franklin and Arthur Lee, who were unenthused by the proposal. Meanwhile, King Louis XVI feared angering Britain and prohibited Lafayette's departure. The British ambassador to the French court at Versailles demanded the seizure of Lafayette's ship, which resulted in Lafayette's arrest. Lafayette, though, managed to escape, set sail and elude two British ships dispatched to recapture him. Following his safe arrival in South Carolina, Lafayette traveled to Philadelphia. Although Lafayette's youth made Congress reluctant to promote him over more experienced colonial officers, the young Frenchman's willingness to volunteer his services without pay won their respect and Lafayette a commission as major-general on July 31, 1777.
  • 1789 --- Mrs. Alexander Hamilton served a new dessert treat for General George Washington. The highlight of the dinner party was ice cream!
  • 1866 --- The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed by the U.S. Congress. It was ratified on July 9, 1868. The amendment was designed to grant citizenship to and protect the civil liberties of recently freed slaves. It did this by prohibiting states from denying or abridging the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States, depriving any person of his life, liberty, or property without due process of law, or denying to any person within their jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
  • 1888 --- The U.S. Congress created the Department of Labor.
  • 1900 --- China's Boxer Rebellion against foreigners and Chinese Christians erupted.
  • 1922 --- Charlie Osborne started the longest attack of hiccups. He hiccuped over 435 million times before stopping. He died in 1991, 11 months after his hiccups ended.
  • 1948 --- Uniform #3, belonging to Babe Ruth, was retired at farewell ceremonies for the Babe. The touching ceremony at Yankee Stadium came just two months before the baseball legend passed away.
  • 1966 --- The Supreme Court hands down its decision in Miranda v. Arizona, establishing the principle that all criminal suspects must be advised of their rights before interrogation. Now considered standard police procedure, "You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can, and will, be used against you in court of law. You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford one, one will be appointed to you," has been heard so many times in television and film dramas that it has become almost cliche. The roots of the Miranda decision go back to March 2, 1963, when an 18-year-old Phoenix woman told police that she had been abducted, driven to the desert and raped. Detectives questioning her story gave her a polygraph test, but the results were inconclusive. However, tracking the license plate number of a car that resembled that of her attacker's brought police to Ernesto Miranda, who had a prior record as a peeping tom. Although the victim did not identify Miranda in a line-up, he was brought into police custody and interrogated. What happened next is disputed, but officers left the interrogation with a confession that Miranda later recanted, unaware that he didn't have to say anything at all.
  • 1967 --- Solicitor General Thurgood Marshall was nominated by President Lyndon B. Johnson to become the first black justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • 1969 --- Mick Taylor joined The Rolling Stones as Brian Jones' replacement. Taylo9r recently rejoined the band for it’s latest tour.
  • 1971 --- The New York Times begins to publish sections of the so-called "Pentagon Papers," a top-secret Department of Defense study of America's involvement in the Vietnam War. The papers indicated that the American government had been lying to the people for years about the Vietnam War and the papers seriously damaged the credibility of America's Cold War foreign policy. In 1967, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara ordered his department to prepare an in-depth history of American involvement in the Vietnam War. McNamara had already begun to harbor serious doubts about U.S. policy in Vietnam, and the study--which came to be known as the "Pentagon Papers"--substantiated his misgivings. Top-secret memorandums, reports, and papers indicated that the U.S. government had systematically lied to the American people, deceiving them about American goals and progress in the war in Vietnam. The devastating multi-volume study remained locked away in a Pentagon safe for years. In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg, a Defense Department employee who had turned completely against the war, began to smuggle portions of the papers out of the Pentagon. These papers made their way to the New York Times, and on June 13, 1971, the American public read them in stunned amazement. The publication of the papers added further fuel to the already powerful antiwar movement and drove the administration of President Richard Nixon into a frenzy of paranoia about information "leaks."
  • 1979 --- Sioux Indians were awarded $105 million in compensation for the U.S. seizure in 1877 of their Black Hills in South Dakota.
  • 1983 --- After more than a decade in space, Pioneer 10, the world's first outer-planetary probe, leaves the solar system. The next day, it radioed back its first scientific data on interstellar space. On March 2, 1972, the NASA spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on a mission to Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet. In December 1973, after successfully negotiating the asteroid belt and a distance of 620 million miles, Pioneer 10 reached Jupiter and sent back to Earth the first close-up images of the spectacular gas giant. On June 13, 1983, the NASA spacecraft left the solar system.
  • 1985 --- A Doonesbury cartoon strip took a shot at Frank Sinatra by portraying the ‘Chairman of the Board’ as a friend of organized

    crime; the Mafia, in fact. Several of the over 800 newspapers that carried the strip by cartoonist, Garry Trudeau, carried the comic strip panel with a disclaimer.

  • 1988 --- The Liggett Group, a cigarette manufacturer, was found liable for a lung-cancer death. They were, however, found innocent by the federal jury of misrepresenting the risks of smoking.
  • 1994 --- A jury in Anchorage, Alaska, blamed recklessness by Exxon Corp. and Capt. Joseph Hazelwood for the Exxon Valdez disaster, allowing victims of the nation's worst oil spill to seek $15 billion in damages.
  • Birthdays
  • William Butler Yeats
  • U.N. General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon
  • Malcolm McDowell
  • Richard Thomas
  • Tim Allen
  • Mary Kate Olsen
  • Ashley Olsen
  • Elizabeth Schumann
  • Red Grange
  • Ralph Edwards
  • Paul Lynde
  • Siegfried
  • Ally Sheedy
  • Hannah Strom
  • Bettina Bunge
Tags: