7:38am

Thu May 3, 2012
KALW ALMANAC

Thursday May 3, 2012

  • 124th Day of 2012 / 242 Remaining
  • 48 Days Until Summer Begins
  • Sunrise:6:11
  • Sunset:8:03
  • 13 Hr 52 Min
  • Moon Rise:5:35pm
  • Moon Set:4:16am
  • Moon’s Phase: 92 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • May 5 @ 8:36pm
  • Full Flower Moon
  • Full Corn Planting Moon
  • Full Milk Moon

In most areas, flowers are abundant everywhere during this time. Thus, the name of this Moon. Other names include the Full Corn Planting Moon, or the Milk Moon.

  • Tides
  • High:9:32am/9:26pm
  • Low:3:16am/3;05pm
  • Rainfall
  • This Year:15.65
  • Last Year:25.17
  • Normal To Date:23.03
  • Annual Seasonal Average: 23.80
  • Holidays
  • Childhood Depression Awareness Day
  • Garden Meditation Day
  • Lumpy Rug Day
  • Specially-Abled Pets Day
  • Nat’l Teacher Day
  • Two Different Colored Shoes Day
  • Paranormal Day
  • Raspberry Popover Day
  • UN World Press Freedom Day
  • Constitution Day-Poland
  • Constitution Memorial Day-Japan
  • Day Of The Holy Cross-Mexico
  • Fiesta de las Cruces-Peru
  • On This Day In …
  • 1802 --- Washington, D.C., was incorporated.
  • 1855 --- Macon B. Allen became the first African American to be admitted to the Bar in Massachusetts.
  • 1921 --- West Virginia imposed the first state sales tax.
  • 1936 --- Baseball Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio made his major league debut with the New York Yankees.
  • 1937 --- Margaret Mitchell won a Pulitzer Prize for her novel "Gone with the Wind."
  • 1946 --- In Tokyo, Japan, the International Military Tribunals for the Far East begins hearing the case against 28 Japanese military and government officials accused of committing war crimes and crimes against humanity during World War II. On November 4, 1948, the trial ended with 25 of 28 Japanese defendants being found guilty. Of the three other defendants, two had died during the lengthy trial, and one was declared insane. On November 12, the war crimes tribunal passed death sentences on seven of the men, including General Hideki Tojo, who served as Japanese premier during the war, and other principals, such as Iwane Matsui, who organized the Rape of Nanking, and Heitaro Kimura, who brutalized Allied prisoners of war. Sixteen others were sentenced to life imprisonment, and two were sentenced to lesser terms in prison. On December 23, 1948, Tojo and the six others were executed in Tokyo. Unlike the Nuremberg trial of Nazi war criminals, where there were four chief prosecutors, to represent Great Britain, France, the United States, and the USSR, the Tokyo trial featured only one chief prosecutor--American Joseph B. Keenan, a former assistant to the U.S. attorney general. However, other nations, especially China, contributed to the proceedings, and Australian judge William Flood Webb presided. In addition to the central Tokyo trial, various tribunals sitting outside Japan judged some 5,000 Japanese guilty of war crimes, of whom more than 900 were executed. Some observers thought that Emperor Hirohito should have been tried for his tacit approval of Japanese policy during the war, but he was protected by U.S. authorities who saw him as a symbol of Japanese unity and conservatism, both favorable traits in the postwar U.S. view.
  • 1947 --- Japan’s postwar constitution goes into effect. The progressive constitution granted universal suffrage, stripped Emperor Hirohito of all but symbolic power, stipulated a bill of rights, abolished peerage, and outlawed Japan's right to make war. The document was largely the work of Supreme Allied Commander Douglas MacArthur and his occupation staff, who had prepared the draft in February 1946 after a Japanese attempt was deemed unacceptable.
  • 1948 --- The Supreme Court ruled that covenants prohibiting the sale of real estate to blacks and other minorities were legally unenforceable.
  • 1951 --- The Senate Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committees, meeting in closed session, begin their hearings into the dismissal of Gen. Douglas MacArthur by President Harry S. Truman. The hearings served as a sounding board for MacArthur and his extremist views on how the Cold War should be fought.
  • 1952 --- The first airplane to land at the geographic location of the North Pole did so on this day. The crew may have missed the mark, as they saw no tall barber pole or little red house, no sign of elves and no Santa Claus. There was a report that there was loud, bellowing laughter from not far off and a few reindeer were seen frolicking about, however.
  • 1957 --- Brooklyn Dodgers’ owner, Walter O’Malley, agreed to move the team from Flatbush to sunny Los Angeles. Initially, only exhibition games were held at the L.A. Coliseum. O’Malley said that a new stadium would have to be constructed before the Dodgers would even consider a move to Southern California. He was right, so Dodger Stadium (in Chavez Ravine) was constructed with private investor money.
  • 1966 --- The game "Twister" was featured on the "Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson.
  • 1971 --- Anti-war protesters began four days of demonstrations in Washington, D.C.
  • 1971 --- National Public Radio, the U.S. national, non-commercial radio network, was born. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting financed National Public Radio so we could, once again, have the thrill of live radio. Listeners turned to NPR for cultural programs, news, information and quality entertainment programming. Award-winning programming such as All Things Considered, NPR’s premier newsmagazine, presented uninterrupted, informative reports on business, economics and the world, in general -- and still does.  NPR’s most popular shows also include: Talk of the Nation, fascinating and thought-provoking discussions on the day’s issues and what’s behind the headlines; NPR’s Performance Today, a daily portrait of what’s happening in the world of classical music; and Car Talk, starring America’s funniest auto mechanics, the M.I.T. educated grease monkeys, Tom and Ray Magliozzi. NPR also produces and distributes some of America’s finest jazz programming.
  • 1986 --- 54-year-old Willie Shoemaker, aboard 18/1 shot Ferdinand, becomes the oldest jockey ever to win the Kentucky Derby. The victory was just one of Shoemaker’s 8,833 wins, a record that stood until 1999, when it was broken by Laffit Pincay.
  • Birthdays
  • James Brown
  • Pete Seeger
  • Bing Crosby
  • Frankie Valli
  • Engelbert Humperdink
  • Christopher Cross
  • Ann B Davis
  • Sugar Ray Robinson
  • Mary Hopkin
  • William Motter Inge
  • Golda Meir
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