Today on Your Call: Fifty years after the March on Washington, do we have a more just economy?

Aug 13, 2013

On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about the 1963 March on Washington, which included calls for the elimination of racial segregation, and major public-works program to provide jobs. What did “Jobs and Freedom” mean then – and what do they mean today? Join the conversation and call in with your questions on the next Your Call, with me, Rose Aguilar, and you.


Clayborne Carson, professor of history at Stanford University and the director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute. He is the author of Martin’s Dream: My Journey and the Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Eva Paterson, president and a founder of the Equal Justice Society

Dr. Dorothy Cotton, legendary civil rights activist and a close ally of Dr. Martin. She is the author of “ If Your Back's Not Bent: The Role of the Citizenship Education Program in the Civil Rights Movement

Web Resources:

Dorothy Cotton Institute

CSPAN: A conversation with professor Clayborne Carson about his book, Martin’s Dream: My Journey and the Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.,

Stanford University: The Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute

Equal Justice Society

Eva Paterson Debating Vice President Spiro Agnew

EPI: For Jobs and Freedom: An Introduction to the Unfinished March

Dissent: The Forgotten Radical History of the March on Washington