Today on Your Call: What is the power of reconciliation?

Jan 16, 2013

  On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about how people come to terms with past atrocities. The Catholic Diocese in Monterey recently held a reconciliation Mass for a band of Ohlone Indians to publicly acknowledge and apologize for the church’s abuse of native people during the Mission era.  What is the power of a public apology?  Is it enough?  Join us at 10am Pacific or post a comment here.  What does reconciliation mean to you? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you. 


Valentin Lopez, Tribal Chairman of the Amah Mutsun band of Ohlone

Esther Altvater Ettean, lead staff person for the Maine Tribal-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission 

Dr. Greg Kimura, president of the Japanese American National Museum


The Amah Mutsun Tribal Band of Costanoan/Ohlone Indians

The Catholic Diocese of Monterey 

The Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission 

Santa Cruz Sentinel: Monterey bishop offers apology to Amah Mutsun tribe for past abuses

Japanese American National Museum

The Remembrance Project

The Huffington Post: Japanese American Internment Camp Stories: Survivors Urged To Tell Their Tale For 'Remembrance Project'

Representative John Conyers Jr: Reparations for Slavery (HR 40)

Wikipedia: Reparations for Slavery Debate 

Wikipedia: Japanese American Internment

Center for Justice and Accountability