12:00am

Wed January 8, 2014
Economy/Labor/Biz

Today on Your Call: Why are so many people still poor in America?

  

On today's Your Call, we’ll mark the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, which was initiated by President Lyndon Johnson, and included programs like Food Stamps and Head Start.  But the poverty rate has only fallen from 19 to 15 per cent in 50 years.  And children remain at the highest risk.  So did the War on Poverty fail?  What are today’s solutions for uplifting the poor?  Join the conversation on the next Your Call with Matt Martin and You.  

Guests:

Beth Mattingly, researcher with the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality

Ann Stevens, professor of economics and director of the UC Davis Center for Poverty Research

Martha Bailey, associate professor of economics at University of Michigan; and co-editor of "Legacies of the War on Poverty"

Resources:

Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality 

UC Davis Center for Poverty Research

Russell Sage Foundation: Legacies of the War on Poverty

NY Times: 50 Years Later, War on Poverty Is a Mixed Bag

NPR: Fifty Years Later, Did The U.S. Win The War On Poverty?

American Radio Works: War on Poverty: From the Great Society to the Great Recession

Stanford: Stanford releases new poverty index

Stanford Daily: Stanford scholars reveal 22 percent of CA residents in poverty

The New Press: A People’s History of Poverty in America

You Tube: Lyndon Johnson State of the Union Address - War on Poverty (January 8, 1964)

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