5:56am

Tue April 10, 2012
KALW ALMANAC

Tuesday April 10, 2012

  • 101st Day of 2012 / 265 Remaining
  • 71 Days Until Summer Begins
  • Sunrise:6:41
  • Sunset:7:42
  • 12 Hr 1 Min
  • Moon Rise:12:39am(wed)
  • Moon Set:9:37am
  • Moon’s Phase: 78 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • May 5 @ 8:36pm
  • Full Flower Moon
  • Full Corn Planting Moon
  • Full Milk Moon

In most areas, flowers are abundant everywhere during this time. Thus, the name of this Moon. Other names include the Full Corn Planting Moon, or the Milk Moon.

  • Tides
  • High:1:33am/3:27pm
  • Low:8:27am/8:26pm
  • Rainfall
  • This Year:12.97
  • Last Year:24.61
  • Normal To Date:20.96
  • Annual Average: 22.28
  • Holidays
  • Commodore Perry Day
  • National Siblings Day
  • National Cinnamon Crescent Day
  • Dust the Ceiling Fan Day
  • Salvation Army Founder's Day
  • International Be Kind to Lawyers Day
  • On This Day In …
  • 1849 --- Walter Hunt of New York City patented the safety pin. Most of us still use the device which comes in a variety of sizes and is quite handy to have around. Mr. Hunt, however, didn’t think so. He thought the safety pin to be a temporary convenience and sold the patent for a total of $400. Bet he could just ‘stick’ himself for doing that.
  • 1866 --- The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) is founded in New York City by philanthropist and diplomat Henry Bergh, 54. In 1863, Bergh had been appointed by President Abraham Lincoln to a diplomatic post at the Russian court of Czar Alexander II. It was there that he was horrified to witness work horses beaten by their peasant drivers. En route back to America, a June 1865 visit to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in London awakened his determination to secure a charter not only to incorporate the ASPCA but to exercise the power to arrest and prosecute violators of the law. Back in New York, Bergh pleaded on behalf of "these mute servants of mankind" at a February 8, 1866, meeting at Clinton Hall. He argued that protecting animals was an issue that crossed party lines and class boundaries. "This is a matter purely of conscience; it has no perplexing side issues," he said. "It is a moral question in all its aspects." The speech prompted a number of dignitaries to sign his "Declaration of the Rights of Animals."
  • 1872 --- The first Arbor Day was observed in Nebraska. It was proposed by J. Sterling Morton and publicized by the State Board of Agriculture as a tree-planting holiday. Nebraska at that time was a treeless plain, with nothing to break the wind other than the normal digestive functions of mammals. Trees were also needed for fuel, shade, building houses, etc. Estimates are that more than one million trees were planted in Nebraska on that first Arbor Day. It was proclaimed an official state day in 1874. Other states have since adopted the idea, and several U.S. presidents have declared national Arbor Days, usually the last Friday in April.
  • 1912 --- The RMS Titanic set sail from Southampton, England, on its ill-fated maiden voyage.
  • 1925 --- "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald was published.
  • 1933 --- President Franklin D. Roosevelt establishes the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), an innovative federally funded organization that put thousands of Americans to work during the Great Depression on projects with environmental benefits. In 1932, FDR took America's political helm during the country's worst economic crisis, declaring a "government worthy of its name must make a fitting response" to the suffering of the unemployed. He implemented the CCC a little over one month into his presidency as part of his administration's "New Deal" plan for social and economic progress. The CCC reflected FDR's deep commitment to environmental conservation. He waxed poetic when lobbying for the its passage, declaring "the forests are the lungs of our land [which] purify our air and give fresh strength to our people."
  • 1941 --- Ford Motor Co. became the last major automaker to recognize the United Auto Workers as the representative for its workers.
  • 1947 --- Brooklyn Dodgers president Branch Rickey announced he had purchased the contract of Jackie Robinson from the Montreal Royals.
  • 1961 --- Gary Player of South Africa became the first foreign golfer to win the Masters Golf Tournament in Augusta, Georgia. Player, age 25, won by just one stroke over both Charles Coe, an amateur, and defending champion Arnold Palmer. Coe shot a record 280, which was the lowest score turned in by an amateur at the Masters up to that time.
  • 1962 --- One of the original Beatles, Stu Sutcliffe, died of a brain tumor at age 22.
  • 1970 --- The legendary rock band the Beatles spent the better part of three years breaking up in the late 1960s, and even longer than that hashing out who did what and why. And by the spring of 1970, there was little more than a tangled set of business relationships keeping the group together. Each of the Beatles was pursuing his musical interests outside of the band, and there were no plans in place to record together as a group. But as far as the public knew, this was just a temporary state of affairs. That all changed on April 10, 1970, when an ambiguous Paul McCartney "self-interview" was seized upon by the international media as an official announcement of a Beatles breakup. The occasion for the statements Paul released to the press that day was the upcoming release of his debut solo album, McCartney. In a Q&A format in which he was both the interviewer and the interviewee, Paul first asked and answered a number of straightforward questions involving the recording equipment he used on the album, which instruments he played and who designed the artwork for the cover. Then he got to the tough ones: ---Q: "Is this album a rest away from the Beatles or the start of a solo career?" PAUL: "Time will tell. Being a solo album means it's 'the start of a solo career...and not being done with the Beatles means it's just a rest. So it's both." Q: "Is your break with the Beatles temporary or permanent, due to personal differences or musical ones?" PAUL: "Personal differences, business differences, musical differences, but most of all because I have a better time with my family. Temporary or permanent? I don't really know." Q: "Do you foresee a time when Lennon-McCartney becomes an active songwriting partnership again?" PAUL: "No." --- Nothing in Paul's answers constituted a definitive statement about the Beatles' future, but his remarks were nevertheless reported in the press under headlines like "McCartney Breaks Off With Beatles" and "The Beatles sing their swan song." And whatever his intent at the time, Paul's statements drove a further wedge between himself and his bandmates. In the May 14, 1970, issue of Rolling Stone, John Lennon lashed out at Paul in a way he'd never done publicly: "He can't have his own way, so he's causing chaos," John said. "I put out four albums last year, and I didn't say a f***ing word about quitting." By year's end, Paul would file suit to dissolve the Beatles' business partnership, a formal process that would eventually make official the unofficial breakup he announced on this day in 1970.
  • 1971 --- The American table tennis team arrived in China. They were the first group of Americans officially allowed into China since the founding of the People Republic in 1949. The team had recieved the surprise invitation while in Japan for the 31st World Table Tennis Championship.
  • 1972 --- As part of his first visit to the United States in 20 years, British film pioneer Charlie Chaplin accepts an honorary Academy Award for his "incalculable" contribution to the art of filmmaking. Chaplin, once America's most successful movie star and director, had left the country under a storm of controversy in 1952. Away from the camera, Chaplin's personal life often drew sensational headlines. He was married four times, three times to his leading ladies, and in 1943 was accused by another woman of fathering her child. That year, in another controversial move, he married Oona O'Neill, the 18-year-old daughter of playwright Eugene O'Neill. Chaplin was 54. Chaplin's political views were also criticized, as was his failure to apply for U.S. citizenship. Pressed for back taxes and accused of supporting subversive causes by McCarthy-era America, Chaplin left the United States in 1952. Informed that he would not necessarily be welcomed back, he retorted, "I wouldn't go back there if Jesus Christ were president," and surrendered his re-entry permit in Switzerland. He lived with his family at Corsier-sur-Vevey, Switzerland, and made several more films. In April 1972, he did return to the United States for a visit and accepted an honorary Oscar. He had previously won an honorary Academy Award, in 1929 for The Circus (1928). In 1975, Queen Elizabeth II knighted him.
  • 1981 --- Imprisoned IRA hunger striker Bobby Sands won election to the British Parliament.
  • 1990 --- Singer Sinead O'Connor's album, "I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got," sold a half-million copies in one day.
  • 1998 --- Negotiators in Northern Ireland reached a landmark settlement that called for Protestants and Catholics to share power.
  • Birthdays
  • Joseph Pulitzer
  • Vladimir Lenin
  • William Booth
  • Bunny Wailer
  • Brian Setzer
  • Omar Sharif
  • Max von Sydow
  • John Madden
  • Steven Seagal
  • Commodore Matthew Perry
  • Lew Wallace
  • Harry Morgan
  • Paul Edward Theroux
  • Shemekia Copeland
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