6:47am

Tue July 9, 2013
KALW Almanac

Tuesday July 9, 2013

1995
1995

  • 190th Day of 2013 / 175 Remaining
  • 75 Days Until The First Day of Autumn
  • Sunrise:5:56
  • Sunset:8:33
  • 14 Hours 37 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:7:23am
  • Moon Set:9:18pm
  • Moon’s Phase:2 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • July 22 @ 11:16am
  • Full Buck Moon
  • Full Thunder Moon
  • Full Hay Moon

July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur. It was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, for the reason that thunderstorms are most frequent during this time. Another name for this month’s Moon was the Full Hay Moon.

  • Tides
  • High:1:23pm
  • Low:6:24am/6:21pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • Normal To Date:0.0
  • This Year:0.0
  • Last Year:0.0
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • National Sugar Cookie Day
  • Bald In-Bald Out
  • National Hop-A-Park Day
  • Flag Day-Alaska
     
  • Independence Day-Argentina
  • Youth Day-Morocco
  • Constitution Day-Palau
  • Senior Race Day-Isle of Man
  • On This Day In …
  • 1776 --- The Declaration of Independence was read aloud to Gen. George Washington's troops in New York.
  • 1815 --- The first natural gas well in the U.S. was discovered by accident, near Charleston, West Virginia. They had been digging a salt brine well.
  • 1868 --- The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified. The amendment was designed to grant citizenship to and protect the civil liberties of recently freed slaves. It did this by prohibiting states from denying or abridging the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States, depriving any person of his life, liberty, or property without due process of law, or denying to any person within their jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
  • 1869 --- Henry Tibbe invented the corncob pipe. The pipe was made from a white kernel corn that was used to make taco and tortilla flour.
  • 1872 --- John F. Blondel of Thomason (Thomaston?), Maine, patented the first doughnut cutter.
  • 1877 --- All England Croquet and Lawn Tennis Club begins its first lawn tennis tournament at Wimbledon, then an outer-suburb of London. Twenty-one amateurs showed up to compete in the Gentlemen's Singles tournament, the only event at the first Wimbledon. The winner was to take home a 25-guinea trophy. The Twenty-two men registered for the tournament, but only 21 showed up on July 9 for its first day. The 11 survivors were reduced to six the next day, and then to three. Semifinals were held on July 12, but then the tournament was suspended to leave the London sporting scene free for the Eton vs. Harrow cricket match played on Friday and Saturday. The final was scheduled for Monday, July 16, but, in what would become a common occurrence in future Wimbledon tournaments, the match was rained out. It was rescheduled for July 19, and on that day some 200 spectators paid a shilling each to see William Marshall, a Cambridge tennis "Blue," battle W. Spencer Gore, an Old Harrovian racket player. In a final that lasted only 48 minutes, the 27-year-old Gore dominated with his strong volleying game, crushing Marshall, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4.
  • 1896 --- William Jennings Bryan caused a sensation at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago with his "cross of gold" speech denouncing supporters of the gold standard. Bryan went on to win the party's nomination.
  • 1922 --- Johnny Weissmuller became the first to swim the 100-meters freestyle in less than a minute. The future Tarzan set the pace at an event in Alameda.
  • 1948 --- 42-year-old Leroy "Satchel" Paige pitches two innings for the Cleveland Indians in his debut with the newly--and barely--integrated American League. The game came 21 years after the great pitcher’s first Negro League appearance. Page was born on July 7, 1906, in Mobile, Alabama. Page’s family changed the spelling of their name to Paige to differentiate themselves from John Page, Leroy’s absent and abusive father. "Satchel" got his nickname as a boy while working as a luggage carrier at the Mobile train station. When he was 12, his constant truancy coupled with a shoplifting incident got him sent to the Industrial School for Negro Children in Mount Meigs, Alabama. It turned out to be a lucky break, as it was there that Paige learned to pitch. After leaving the school, he turned pro. From 1927 to 1948 Satchel Paige was the baseball equivalent of a hired gun: He pitched for any team in the United States or abroad that could afford him. He was the highest paid pitcher of his time, and he wowed crowds with the speed of his fastball, his trick pitches and his considerable bravado. Just for fun, Paige would sometimes call in his outfield and then strike out the side. From 1939 to 1942, the Kansas City Monarchs paid up for his services and were justly rewarded: Paige led the team to four consecutive Negro American League pennants from 1939 to 1942. In the 1942 Negro League World Series, Satchel won three games in a four-game sweep of the Homestead Grays, led by famed slugger Josh Gibson. Paige’s contract was bought by Bill Veeck’s Cleveland Indians on July 7, 1948, his 42nd birthday. He made his major league debut two days later, entering in the fifth inning against the St. Louis Browns with the Indians trailing 4-1. He gave up two singles in two innings, striking one man out and inducing one batter to hit into a double play. The Indians lost the game 5-3 in spite of Paige’s contribution. That year Satchel Paige went 6-1 with a solid 2.48 ERA for the World Champion Cleveland Indians. Paige was named to Major League Baseball’s All-Star Team for the American League in 1952 and 1953, when he was 46 and 47 years old respectively. In 1965, Paige pitched for the Kansas City Athletics, which made him, at 59 years, 2 months and 18 days, the oldest pitcher ever to play a game in the major leagues. Arguably the greatest pitcher of his era, Paige was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.
  • 1956 --- Dick Clark made his debut as host of "Bandstand" on a Philadelphia TV station. The name of the show was changed to "American Bandstand" when it went to ABC-TV.
  • 1962 --- "This here ain't no protest song or anything like that, 'cause I don't write no protest songs." That was how Bob Dylan introduced one of the most eloquent protest songs ever written when he first performed it publicly. It was the spring of his first full year in New York City, and he was onstage at Gerde's Folk City in Greenwich Village, talking about a song he claims to have written in just 10 minutes: "Blowin' In The Wind." A few weeks later, on this day in 1962, Dylan walked into a studio and recorded the song that would make him a star.
  • 1968 --- The first All-Star baseball game to be played indoors took place at the Astrodome in Houston. The game produced only eight hits over nine innings and no runs were batted in. Willie Mays of the San Francisco Giants scored the only run on a single in the first inning. He moved to second on an errant pick-off play, went to third base on a wild pitch and scored on a double play. The National League beat the American League 1-0.
  • 1972 --- Paul McCartney appeared on stage for the first time since 1966 as his group, Wings, opened at Chateauvillon in the south of France.
  • 1977 --- Elvis Costello quit his day job as a computer operator at a cosmetic factory.
  • 1993 --- British forensic scientists announce that they have positively identified the remains of Russia's last czar, Nicholas II; his wife, Czarina Alexandra; and three of their daughters. The scientists used mitochondria DNA fingerprinting to identify the bones, which had been excavated from a mass grave near Yekaterinburg in 1991.
  • 1995 --- The Grateful Dead played its last live show -- at Chicago’s Soldier Field. Guitarist Jerry Garcia died one month later of a heart attack in his room at a Marin County treatment facility.
  • 1999 --- Mary Chapin Carpenter canceled a concert at Hammons Hall for the Performing Arts in Springfield, MO, at the last minute. She had to fly home to tend to a very sick Golden Retriever.
  • 2004 --- A Senate Intelligence Committee report concluded the CIA had provided unfounded assessments of the threat posed by Iraq that the Bush administration relied on to justify going to war.
  • 2005 --- Danny Way, a daredevil skateboarder, rolled down a large ramp and jumped across the Great Wall of China. He was the first person to clear the wall without motorized aid.
  • Birthdays
  • Ann Radcliffe
  • Oliver Sachs
  • Nicola Tesla
  • Ottorino Vespighi
  • Clara Bow
  • Kelly McGillis
  • Chris Cooper
  • Tom Hanks
  • Donald Rumsfeld
  • Brian Dennehy
  • Richard Roundtree
  • O J Simpson
  • John Tesh
  • Jimmy Smits
  • Courtney Love
  • Jack White
  • Elais Howe
  • Dorothy Thompson
  • Ed Ames
  • Debbie Sledge
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