5:28am

Tue June 18, 2013
KALW Almanac

Tuesday June 18, 2013

1983

  • 169th Day of 2013 / 186 Remaining
  • 3 Days Until The First Day of Summer
  • Sunrise:5:47
  • Sunset:8:34
  • 14 Hours 47 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:3:28pm
  • Moon Set:1:54am
  • Moon’s Phase:72 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • June 23 @ 4:33am
  • Full Strawberry Moon
  • Full Rose Moon

The Strawberry Moon was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June . . . so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!

  • Tides
  • High:7:18am/7:11pm
  • Low:1;18am/12:33pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • Normal To Date:23.80
  • This Year:16.36
  • Last Year:15.77
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • National Cherry Tart Day
  • International Sushi Day
  • World Juggling Day
  • International Picnic Day
  • Evacuation Day-Egypt
  • On This Day In …
  • 1798 --- President John Adams passes the Naturalization Act, the first of four pieces of controversial legislation known together as the Alien and Sedition Acts, on this day in 1798. Strong political opposition to these acts succeeded in undermining the Adams administration, helping Thomas Jefferson to win the presidency in 1800.
  • 1812 --- The day after the Senate followed the House of Representatives in voting to declare war against Great Britain, President James Madison signs the declaration into law--and the War of 1812 begins. The American war declaration, opposed by a sizable minority in Congress, had been called in response to the British economic blockade of France, the induction of American seaman into the British Royal Navy against their will, and the British support of hostile Indian tribes along the Great Lakes frontier. A faction of Congress known as the "War Hawks" had been advocating war with Britain for several years and had not hidden their hopes that a U.S. invasion of Canada might result in significant territorial land gains for the United States.
  • 1815 -- At the Battle of Waterloo Napoleon was defeated by an international army under the Duke of Wellington. Napoleon abdicated on June 22.
  • 1817 --- London's Waterloo Bridge opened. The bridge, designed by John Rennie, was built over the River Thames.
  • 1873 --- Susan B. Anthony was fined $100 for attempting to vote for a U.S. President.
  • 1923 --- The first Checker C ab Rolled off the assembly line in Kalamazoo Michigan.
  • 1928 --- Aviator Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean as she completed a flight from Newfoundland to Wales in about 21 hours.
  • 1948 --- The United Nations Commission on Human Rights adopted its International Declaration of Human Rights.
  • 1948 --- Columbia Records unveiled its new long-playing, 33 1/3 rpm phonograph record.
  • 1967 --- By the time they got to Woodstock, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, the Who and the Grateful Dead were established superstars—heroes to the roughly half a million worshipful fans who trekked up to Max Yasgur's farm to see them in the summer of 1969. Yet just two years earlier, they were entirely unknown to most of those worshipers. All four iconic figures on the 1960s music scene entered the American popular consciousness at an event that preceded and provided the inspiration for Woodstock itself: the Monterey Pop Festival. Held over three days during the height of the Summer of Love, the Monterey Pop Festival came to a close on this day in 1967, with a lineup of performers that included all of the aforementioned acts as well as Ravi Shankar, Buffalo Springfield and the Mamas and the Papas.
  • 1972 --- Newspapers around the country, including The Washington Post, reported a burglary. The story took up nothing more than a couple of inches of copy, buried inside the paper and out of sight of the day’s top news stories. The burglary, on the 6th floor of a plush Washington, D.C. apartment and office complex called the Watergate, would later drive President Richard M. Nixon from the White House. The growing story became a Pulitzer Prize-winner for journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.
  • 1979 --- During a summit meeting in Vienna, President Jimmy Carter and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev sign the SALT-II agreement dealing with limitations and guidelines for nuclear weapons. The treaty, which never formally went into effect, proved to be one of the most controversial U.S.-Soviet agreements of the Cold War. The SALT-II agreement was the result of many nagging issues left over from the successful SALT-I treaty of 1972. Though the 1972 treaty limited a wide variety of nuclear weapons, many issues remained unresolved. Talks between the United States and the Soviet Union began almost immediately after SALT-I was ratified by both nations in 1972. Those talks failed to achieve any new breakthroughs, however. By 1979, both the United States and Soviet Union were eager to revitalize the process. For the United States, fear that the Soviets were leaping ahead in the arms race was the primary motivator. For the Soviet Union, the increasingly close relationship between America and communist China was a cause for growing concern. In June 1979, Carter and Brezhnev met in Vienna and signed the SALT-II agreement. The treaty basically established numerical equality between the two nations in terms of nuclear weapons delivery systems. It also limited the number of MIRV missiles (missiles with multiple, independent nuclear warheads). In truth, the treaty did little or nothing to stop, or even substantially slow down, the arms race. Nevertheless, it met with unrelenting criticism in the United States. The treaty was denounced as a "sellout" to the Soviets, one that would leave America virtually defenseless against a whole range of new weapons not mentioned in the agreement. Even supporters of arms control were less than enthusiastic about the treaty, since it did little to actually control arms.
  • 1983 --- From Cape Canaveral, Florida, the space shuttle Challenger is launched into space on its second mission. Aboard the shuttle was Dr. Sally Ride, who as a mission specialist became the first American woman to travel into space. During the six-day mission, Ride, an astrophysicist from Stanford University, operated the shuttle's robot arm, which she had helped design. Her historic journey was preceded almost 20 years to the day by cosmonaut Valentina V. Tereshkova of the Soviet Union, who on June 16, 1963, became the first woman ever to travel into space. The United States had screened a group of female pilots in 1959 and 1960 for possible astronaut training but later decided to restrict astronaut qualification to men. In 1978, NASA changed its policy and announced that it had approved six women to become the first female astronauts in the U.S. space program. The new astronauts were chosen out of some 3,000 original applicants. Among the six were Sally Ride and Shannon Lucid, who in 1996 set a new space endurance record for an American and a world endurance record for a woman during her 188-day sojourn on the Russian space station Mir.
  • 1984 --- Talk radio icon Alan Berg, the self-described "man you love to hate," is gunned down and killed instantly in the driveway of his home in Denver, Colorado, on this day in 1984. The 50-year-old host, whose show on the station KOA gained a strong following in the early 1980s, stirred up controvesy with his outspoken personality, abrasive approach and liberal views. He had already been the target of a steady stream of death threats.
  • 1993 --- So-called 'killer bees,' Africanized honey bees, reached Tucson, Arizona; a small dog was killed from a bee attack. Their original source was Brazil, where African bees were imported for experimental cross breeding.
  • Birthdays
  • Sir Paul McCartney
  • Sammy Cahn
  • Robert Mondavi
  • Lou Brock
  • Carol Kane
  • Isabella Rossellini
  • Alison Moyet
  • Anastasia
  • Jeanette McDonald
  • Roger Ebert
  • Gail Godwin
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