6:05am

Tue March 25, 2014
KALW Almanac

Tuesday March 25, 2014

1989
1989

  • 84th Day of 2014 / 281 Remaining
  • 88 Days Until The First Day of Summer
  • Sunrise:7:03
  • Sunset:7:26
  • 12 Hours 23 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:3:26am
  • Moon Set:2:08pm
  • Moon’s Phase: 31 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • April 15 @ 12:45 am
  • Full Pink Moon
  • Full Sprouting Moon
  • Full Egg Moon
  • Full Grass Moon
  • Full Fish Moon

This name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. Other names for this month’s celestial body include the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and among coastal tribes the Full Fish Moon, because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

  • Tides
  • High:6:21am/8:21pm
  • Low:12:31am/1:18pm
  • Rainfall
  • This Year:8.68
  • Last Year:14.73
  • Average Year to Date:20.93
  • Holidays
  • American Diabetes Association Alert Day
  • National ‘Ag’ Day
  • National Lobster Newburg Day
  • Pecan Day
  • Tolkien Reading Day
  • Maryland Day-Maryland
  • Schmeckfest-Freeman, South Dakota
  • Independence Day-Greece
  • Waffle Day(Våffeldagen)-Sweden
  • Tichborne Dole Day-England(A gallon of flour is given to residents of Alresford, Hampshire, England. The tradition dates to 1150.  Lady Mabella Tichborne put a curse on any ancestors who failed to distribute her charitable dole.)
  • On This Day In …
  • 1306 --- Robert the Bruce was crowned king of Scotland.
  • 1655 --- Christian Huygens discovered Titan. Titan is Saturn's largest satellite.
  • 1774 --- British Parliament passes the Boston Port Act, closing the port of Boston and demanding that the city's residents pay for the nearly $1 million worth (in today's money) of tea dumped into Boston Harbor during the Boston Tea Party of December 16, 1773.
  • 1775 --- Pecan Day. George Washington planted pecan trees (some of which still survive) at Mount Vernon. The trees were supposedly a gift to Washington from Thomas Jefferson.
  • 1807 --- British Parliament abolished its slave trade.
  • 1867 --- The 2 mile long, 5 foot diameter Chicago Lake Tunnel was activated.  It was the first water supply tunnel for a U.S. city.
  • 1911 --- In New York City, 146 women were killed in fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company in New York City. The owners of the company were indicted on manslaughter charges because some of the employees had been behind locked doors in the factory. The owners were later acquitted and in 1914 they were ordered to pay damages to each of the twenty-three families that had sued.
  • 1913 --- The Palace Theatre opened its doors in New York City. Ed Wynn was first on the vaudeville bill. Some 20 years later, Wynn would be named as radio’s top entertainer. He later became popular on television, as well.
  • 1943 --- Jimmy Durante and Garry Moore premiered on network radio. The pair replaced the popular Abbott and Costello following Lou Costello’s heart attack. Durante and Moore stayed on the air for four years. Moore would later make the move to television with The Garry Moore Show and To Tell the Truth both on CBS. Durante would also become a TV star on ABC with The Jimmy Durante Show in addition to nightclub appearances, movies and records.
  • 1955 --- The U.S. Customs Department confiscates 520 copies of Allen Ginsberg's book Howl, which had been printed in England. Officials alleged that the book was obscene. City Lights, a publishing company and bookstore in San Francisco owned by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, proceeded to publish the book in the fall of 1956. The publication led to Ferlinghetti's arrest on obscenity charges. Ferlinghetti was bailed out by the American Civil Liberties Union, which led the legal defense. Nine literary experts testified at the trial that the poem was not obscene, and Ferlinghetti was found not guilty.
  • 1957 --- France, West Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg sign a treaty in Rome establishing the European Economic Community (EEC), also known as the Common Market. The EEC, which came into operation in January 1958, was a major step in Europe's movement toward economic and political union.
  • 1961 --- Elvis Presley performed his first post-Army appearance, a benefit for planning and building the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The concert raised well over $64,000 and raised public awareness of the need for the memorial.
  • 1965 --- Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. led 25,000 marchers to the state capitol in Montgomery, Ala., to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks.
  • 1966 --- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the "poll tax" was unconstitutional.
  • 1967 --- The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., leads a march of 5,000 antiwar demonstrators in Chicago. In an address to the demonstrators, King declared that the Vietnam War was "a blasphemy against all that America stands for." King first began speaking out against American involvement in Vietnam in the summer of 1965. In addition to his moral objections to the war, he argued that the war diverted money and attention from domestic programs to aid the black poor. He was strongly criticized by other prominent civil rights leaders for attempting to link civil rights and the antiwar movement.
  • 1967 --- The Who made its U.S. concert debut in New York.
  • 1968 --- The 58th and final episode of "The Monkees" TV show was aired.
  • 1968 --- After being told by Defense Secretary Clark Clifford that the Vietnam War is a "real loser," President Johnson, still uncertain about his course of action, decides to convene a nine-man panel of retired presidential advisors. The group, which became known as the "Wise Men," included the respected generals Omar Bradley and Matthew Ridgway, distinguished State Department figures like Dean Acheson and George Ball, and McGeorge Bundy, National Security advisor to both the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. After two days of deliberation the group reached a consensus: they advised against any further troop increases and recommended that the administration seek a negotiated peace. Although Johnson was initially furious at their conclusions, he quickly came to believe that they were right. On March 31, Johnson announced on television that he was restricting the bombing of North Vietnam to the area just north of the Demilitarized Zone. Additionally, he committed the United States to discuss peace at any time or place. Then Johnson announced that he would not pursue reelection for the presidency.
  • 1975 --- King Faisal of Saudi Arabia was shot to death by a nephew. The nephew, with a history of mental illness, was beheaded the following June.
  • 1989 --- In Paris, the Louvre reopened with I.M. Pei's new courtyard pyramid.
  • 1992 --- Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev returned to Earth from the Mir space station after a 10-month stay, during which his native country, the Soviet Union, ceased to exist.
  • Birthdays
  • Elton John
  • Gloria Steinem
  • Anita Bryant
  • Aretha Franklin
  • Mary Gross
  • Sarah Jessica Parker
  • Danica Patrick
  • Arturo Tuscanini
  • Sir David Lean
  • Evan Jacob (38)
  • Bela Bartok
  • Simone Signoret
  • Howard Cosell
  • Jim Lovell
  • Hoyt Axton
  • Nick Lowe
  • Debi Thomas
  • Sheryl Swoops
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