5:56am

Tue May 15, 2012
KALW ALMANAC

Tuesday May 15, 2012

  • 136th Day of 2012 / 230 Remaining
  • 36 Days Until Summer Begins
  • Sunrise:5:59
  • Sunset:8:14
  • 14 Hours 15 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:2:59am
  • Moon Set:3:42pm
  • Moon’s Phase: 23 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • June 4 @ 4:11am
  • Full Strawberry Moon
  • Full Rose Moon
  • Full Milk Moon
  • This name was universal to every Algonquin tribe. However, in Europe they called it the Rose Moon. Also because the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries comes each year during the month of June, so the full Moon that occurs during that month was christened for the strawberry!
  • Tides
  • High:8:04am/8:21pm
  • Low:2:15am/1:44pm
  • Rainfall
  • This Year:15.67
  • Last Year:26.44
  • Normal To Date:23.32
  • Annual Seasonal Average: 23.80
  • Holidays
  • Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season
  • Nylon Stockings Day
  • Peace Officer Memorial Day
  • National Chocolate Chip Day
  • Relive Your Past By Listening to the First Music You Ever Bought No Matter What It Was No Excuses Day
  • UN International Day of Families
  • International Conscientious Objector Day
  • International Day of Families
  • Hollyhock Festival (Aoi Matsuri)-Japan
  • San Isidoro Day-Mexico
  • Independence Day-Paraguay
  • Mother's Day-Samoa
  • Teacher's DaySouth-Korea
  • International Sea Monkey Day
  • On This Day In …
  • 1756 --- The Seven Years War, a global conflict known in America as the French and Indian War, officially begins when England declares war on France. However, fighting and skirmishes between England and France had been going on in North America for years.In the early 1750s, French expansion into the Ohio River valley repeatedly brought France into armed conflict with the British colonies. In 1756--the first official year of fighting in the Seven Years War--the British suffered a series of defeats against the French and their broad network of Native American alliances. However, in 1757, British Prime Minister William Pitt (the older) recognized the potential of imperial expansion that would come out of victory against the French and borrowed heavily to fund an expanded war effort. Pitt financed Prussia's struggle against France and her allies in Europe and reimbursed the colonies for the raising of armies in North America.
  • 1862 --- The U.S. Congress created the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
  • 1888 --- The swinging washing machine was patented. The machine was attached to a large swing, which children could swing in and power the machine.
  • 1911 --- The Supreme Court ordered the dissolution of Standard Oil Company, ruling it was in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act.
  • 1918 --- Regular airmail service between New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. began under the direction of the Post Office Department, a forerunner of the United States Postal Service.
  • 1930 --- Ellen Church became the first stewardess for an airline. Church served passengers flying between San Francisco, California and Cheyenne, Wyoming on United Airlines. She also served chicken, fruit salad and rolls. The term ‘stewardess’ has since been banished. The men and women who serve on airlines worldwide are known as flight attendants. Remember, the exits are clearly marked and life support cushions are located beneath the web site. We’ll begin beverage service in a few moments.
  • 1940 --- Nylon stockings appeared on sale for the first time in the U.S. Competing brands went on sale simultaneously under an agreement between manufacturers.
  • 1941 --- Joe DiMaggio began his historic major league baseball hitting streak of 56 games.
  • 1942 --- Gasoline rationing began in 17 Eastern states as an attempt to help the American war effort during World War II. By the end of the year, President Franklin D. Roosevelt had ensured that mandatory gasoline rationing was in effect in all 50 states. America had been debating its entrance into World War II until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The following day, Congress almost unanimously approved Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war against Japan and three days later Japan's allies Germany and Italy declared war against the United States. On the home front, ordinary Americans almost immediately felt the impact of the war, as the economy quickly shifted from a focus on consumer goods into full-time war production. As part of this transformation, women went to work in the factories to replace enlisted men, automobile factories began producing tanks and planes for Allied forces and households were required to limit their consumption of such products as rubber, gasoline, sugar, alcohol and cigarettes. 
  • 1948 --- Hours after declaring its independence, the new state of Israel was attacked by Transjordan, Egypt, Syria, Iraq and Lebanon.
  • 1970 --- Phillip Lafayette Gibbs and James Earl Green, two black students at Jackson State University in Mississippi, were killed when police opened fire during student protests.
  • 1972 --- During an outdoor rally in Laurel, Maryland, George Wallace, the governor of Alabama and a presidential candidate, is shot by 21-year-old Arthur Bremer. Three others were wounded, and Wallace was permanently paralyzed from the waist down. The next day, while fighting for his life in a hospital, he won major primary victories in Michigan and Maryland. However, Wallace remained in the hospital for several months, bringing his third presidential campaign to an irrevocable end. Wallace, one of the most controversial politicians in U.S. history, was elected governor of Alabama in 1962 under an ultra-segregationist platform. In his 1963 inaugural address, Wallace promised his white followers: "Segregation now! Segregation tomorrow! Segregation forever!" However, the promise lasted only six months. In June 1963, under federal pressure, he was forced to end his blockade of the University of Alabama and allow the enrollment of African American students. Despite his failures in slowing the accelerating civil rights movement in the South, Wallace became a national spokesman for resistance to racial change and in 1964 entered the race for the U.S. presidency. Although defeated in most Democratic presidential primaries he entered, his modest successes demonstrated the extent of popular backlash against integration. In 1968, he made another strong run as the candidate of the American Independent Party and managed to get on the ballot in all 50 states. On Election Day, he drew 10 million votes from across the country. In 1972, Governor Wallace returned to the Democratic Party for his third presidential campaign and, under a slightly more moderate platform, was showing promising returns when Arthur Bremer shot him on May 15, 1972. After his recovery, he faded from national prominence and made a poor showing in his fourth and final presidential campaign in 1979.
  • 1978 --- Country singer Willie Nelson released Stardust, an album of pop songs. The LP stayed on the music charts for 10 years and sold over 5-million copies.
  • 1988 --- The Soviet Union began their withdrawal of its 115,000 troops from Afghanistan. Soviet forces had been there for more than eight years.
  • 2001 --- A runaway freight train rolled about 70 miles through Ohio with no one aboard before a railroad employee jumped onto the locomotive and brought it to a stop.
  • 2008 --- California's Supreme Court declared gay couples in the state could marry – a victory for the gay rights movement that was overturned by the passage of Proposition 8 the following November.
  • Birthdays
  • Trini Lopez
  • Chazz Palminteri
  • Richard Daley
  • Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright
  • Wavy Gravy (Hugh Romney)
  • Brian Eno
  • Kathleen Sebelius-Secretary of Health and Human Services
  • Frank L. Baum
  • Pierre Curie
  • James Mason
  • Tenzing Norgay
  • Catherine East
  • Eddy Arnold
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