5:41am

Wed March 6, 2013
KALW Almanac

Wednesday March 6, 2013

1836

  • 65th Day of 2013 / 300 Remaining
  • 14 Days Until The First Day of Spring
  • Sunrise:6:33
  • Sunset:6:09
  • 11 Hours 38 Minutes of Daylight
  • Moon Rise:2:43am
  • Moon Set:1:01pm
  • Moon’s Phase: 29 %
  • The Next Full Moon
  • March 27 @ 2:30am
  • Full Worm Moon
  • Full Crust Moon
  • Full Lenten Moon
  • Full Crow Moon
  • Full Sap Moon

As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

  • Tides
  • High:6:31am/8:38pm
  • Low:12:24am/1:31pm
  • Rainfall (measured July 1 – June 30)
  • This Year:11.87
  • Last Year:5.77
  • Normal To Date:16.66
  • Annual Seasonal Average:23.80
  • Holidays
  • Namesake Day
  • National Frozen Food Day
  • Dentist’s Day
  • National Chocolate Cheesecake Day
  • Shrovetide
  • Carnival of Binche-Belgium
  • Fasching Sunday-Austria,Germany
  • Independence Day-Ghana
  • Foundation Day-Norfolk Islands
  • World Day Of Prayer-Australia
  • On This Day In …
  • 1646 --- Joseph Jenkes of Massachusetts received the first machine patent. Trouble was, though he had patent in hand, he didn’t quite have a clue as to just what machine he patented, since there were no machines back then.
  • 1820 --- President James Monroe signs the Missouri Compromise, also known as the Compromise Bill of 1820, into law. The bill attempted to equalize the number of slave-holding states and free states in the country, allowing Missouri into the Union as a slave state while Maine joined as a free state. Additionally, portions of the Louisiana Purchase territory north of the 36-degrees-30-minutes latitude line were prohibited from engaging in slavery by the bill. Monroe, who was born into the Virginia slave-holding planter class, favored strong states' rights, but stood back and let Congress argue over the issue of slavery in the new territories. Monroe then closely scrutinized any proposed legislation for its constitutionality. He realized that slavery conflicted with the values written into the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence but, like his fellow Virginians Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, feared abolition would split apart the nation they had fought so hard to establish.
  • 1825 --- Beethoven's Opus 127: String Quartet No. 12 in E flat major was performed for the first time.
  • 1834 --- The city of Toronto was incorporated.
  • 1836 --- Mexican General Santa Anna and his thousand-man army defeated a little band of Texas volunteers. The last of these 189 brave men (who included Davy Crockett) died on March 6, holed up in the Alamo. Their fight for Texas’ liberty did not go unnoticed. 46 days later, with the battle cry, “Remember the Alamo,” General Sam Houston and his Texans captured Santa Anna and finished the job started at the Alamo. Texas gained its independence.
  • 1853 --- Verdi's opera "La Traviata" premiered in Venice, Italy.
  • 1857 --- The U.S. Supreme Court hands down its decision on Sanford v. Dred Scott, a case that intensified national divisions over the issue of slavery. In 1834, Dred Scott, a slave, had been taken to Illinois, a free state, and then Wisconsin territory, where the Missouri Compromise of 1820 prohibited slavery. Scott lived in Wisconsin with his master, Dr. John Emerson, for several years before returning to Missouri, a slave state. In 1846, after Emerson died, Scott sued his master's widow for his freedom on the grounds that he had lived as a resident of a free state and territory. He won his suit in a lower court, but the Missouri supreme court reversed the decision. Scott appealed the decision, and as his new master, J.F.A. Sanford, was a resident of New York, a federal court decided to hear the case on the basis of the diversity of state citizenship represented. After a federal district court decided against Scott, the case came on appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, which was divided along slavery and antislavery lines; although the Southern justices had a majority. During the trial, the antislavery justices used the case to defend the constitutionality of the Missouri Compromise, which had been repealed by the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. The Southern majority responded by ruling on March 6, 1857, that the Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional and that Congress had no power to prohibit slavery in the territories. Three of the Southern justices also held that African Americans who were slaves or whose ancestors were slaves were not entitled to the rights of a federal citizen and therefore had no standing in court. These rulings all confirmed that, in the view of the nation's highest court, under no condition did Dred Scott have the legal right to request his freedom. The Supreme Court's verdict further inflamed the irrepressible differences in America over the issue of slavery, which in 1861 erupted with the outbreak of the American Civil War.
  • 1899 --- The Imperial Patent Office in Berlin registers Aspirin, the brand name for acetylsalicylic acid, on behalf of the German pharmaceutical company Friedrich Bayer & Co. Now the most common drug in household medicine cabinets, acetylsalicylic acid was originally made from a chemical found in the bark of willow trees. In its primitive form, the active ingredient, salicin, was used for centuries in folk medicine, beginning in ancient Greece when Hippocrates used it to relieve pain and fever. Known to doctors since the mid-19thcentury, it was used sparingly due to its unpleasant taste and tendency to damage the stomach. In 1897, Bayer employee Felix Hoffman found a way to create a stable form of the drug that was easier and more pleasant to take. (Some evidence shows that Hoffman's work was really done by a Jewish chemist, Arthur Eichengrun, whose contributions were covered up during the Nazi era.) After obtaining the patent rights, Bayer began distributing aspirin in powder form to physicians to give to their patients one gram at a time. The brand name came from "a" for acetyl, "spir" from the spirea plant (a source of salicin) and the suffix "in," commonly used for medications. It quickly became the number-one drug worldwide.
  • 1912 --- Oreo sandwich cookies were first introduced by the National Biscuit Co., which later became Nabisco.
  • 1930 --- Retail frozen foods go on sale for the first time in Springfield, Massachusetts. Various fruits, vegetables, meat and fish were offered for sale. Clarence Birdseye had developed the method used to successfully freeze foods on a commercial scale.
  • 1946 --- Ho Chi Minh, the President of Vietnam, struck an agreement with France that recognized his country as an autonomous state within the Indochinese Federation and the French Union.
  • 1976 --- The Waylon & Willie (Jennings and Nelson) song, Good Hearted Woman, started the last of three weeks at the top of the country music charts. Waylon and Willie wrote the song in 1969 during a poker game in Ft. Worth, TX. According to Jennings, “I’d been reading an ad for Ike and Tina Turner and it said, ‘Tina Turner singing songs about good-hearted women loving good-timing men.’ I thought, ‘What a great country song title that is!’”
  • 1981 --- Walter Cronkite, the dean of American television newscasters, said “And that’s the way it is” for the final time, as he closed the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite. An audience estimated at 17,000,000 viewers saw ‘the most trusted man in America’ sign-off. Cronkite retired after more than 30 years in broadcasting. He was replaced by Dan Rather at the anchor desk.
  • 1985 --- Yul Brynner played his famous role as the king in The King and I in his 4,500th performance in the musical. The actor, age 64, opened the successful production on Broadway in 1951.
  • 1991 --- In Paris, five men were jailed for plotting to smuggle Libyan arms to the Irish Republican Army.
  • 2007 --- Vice President Dick Cheney's former chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, was convicted of lying and obstructing an investigation into the 2003 leak of CIA operative Valerie Plame's identity.
  • Birthdays
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • Valentina Tereshkova-Nikolaeva
  • Michelangelo
  • Cyrano De Bergerac
  • Ring Lardner
  • Rob Reiner
  • Alan Greenspan
  • Mary Wilson
  • David Gilmour
  • Kiki Dee
  • D L Hughley
  • Shaquille O’Neal
  • Bob Wills
  • Ed Mcmahon
  • Wes Montgomery
  • Lou Costello
  • Gordon Cooper
  • Marion Barry
  • Dame Kiri Te Kanawa
  • Dick Fosbury
  • Willie Stargell
Tags: