Your Call: How is #MeToo affecting low-wage & immigrant workers?

Nov 8, 2017

  

#Metoo continues to make international headlines. Actresses, actors, journalists, and politicians are sharing stories about sexual harassment and assault.

As a result, powerful men in Hollywood and Washington DC have lost their jobs. But how is #metoo affecting low wage earners, who are overwhelmingly women? Restaurant workers, janitors, farm workers, and Walmart workers have been telling their stories for years. What will it take for them to be treated with dignity and respect at work?

Guests:

Sheerine Alemzadeh, attorney and co-founder of Healing to Action, a non-profit organization whose mission is to build a worker-led movement to end gender-based violence

Emily Martin, general counsel and vice president for Workplace Justice at the National Women’s Law Center

Web Resources:

Healing to Action

National Women’s Law Center: Forced Arbitration Protects Sexual Predators and Corporate Wrongdoing

Chicago Business: (Opinion) Sexual harassment and the protection gap for Chicago's low-wage workers

Vox: The unique challenges that low-wage women face when they're sexually harassed at work

The Atlantic: Harvey Weinstein and the Economics of Consent

Labor Notes: No Casting Couch for Low-Wage Women, But Lots of Sexual Harassment

The Restaurant Opportunities Centers United: The Glass Floor, Sexual Harassment in the Restaurant Industry

Legal Aid Work

Motto: Here’s What to Know Before You File a Sexual Harassment Lawsuit

Vice: Working Women and the Sexual Harassment We Don't Hear About

The Cut: The Conversation We Should Be Having

CNN: The (incomplete) list of powerful men accused of sexual harassment after Harvey Weinstein

The New York Times: Women in Tech Speak Frankly on Culture of Harassment

Vanity Fair: Anita Hill’s Legacy Lives on Among Harvey Weinstein’s Accusers