Your Call: What's next after Saturday's global Women's March

Jan 24, 2017

 

On Saturday, more than three million people gathered in cities around the country to oppose Donald Trump's sexist and racist agenda and to raise their voices about reproductive rights, economic justice, the environment, and many other crucial issues. It's said to be the largest march in US history. Marches also took place across the globe.

Attendance numbers shocked organizers across the country. What's next? What will it take to continue this momentum?

Guests:

Micah White, author of The End of Protest and award-winning activist who co-created Occupy Wall Street

Ruth McFarlane, director of development and community engagement for the National Center for Lesbian Rights

Renee Lavalle McKenna, therapist, artist, and co-founder of the San Francisco Women’s March

Jenny Bradanini, leader of the Women's March in San Jose

 

Web Resources:

If you'd like to email Sean Elsbernd, Senator Dianne Feinstein's chief of staff: Sean_Elsbernd@feinstein.senate.gov

The LA Times : Who started the march? One woman

The Guardian : Without a path from protest to power the Women’s March will end up like Occupy

The Atlantic : These Pro Lifers are headed to the Women’s March on Washington

Vox : Why the Women's March on Washington is so popular, in one poll

The Guardian : ‘Silenced' conservatives vow to stay home

The Wall Street Journal : Donald Trump Least Popular New President in at Least a Generation, Poll Finds

Al Jazeera : Bikers for Trump arrive for inauguration with fanfare

Estimated Attendance Figures Collected by Jeremy Pressman (@djpressman, U of Connecticut) and Erica Chenoweth (@EricaChenoweth, U of Denver).

New York Magazine : Women’s March Draws Much Larger Crowd Than Trump’s Inauguration