Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the award-winning daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the divides in our community - economic, social, and cultural.

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Got a general comment, tip, or a story we should cover? Email news@kalw.org or call (415) 264-7106.

Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org

Courtesy of Islamic Scholarship Fund

Back in 2003, the Annals of Political and Social Science published a study of Arab and Muslim portrayals in a Hollywood movies. Out of 900 films, only a dozen had a positive portrayal. 

Muslim Americans in the heartland reckon with sting of national politics

3 hours ago
Daniella Cheslow

 

President Trump campaigned on a promise to ban Muslims from the United States, and imposed travel restrictions on people from several Muslim-majority countries in his first few days in office. These moves have rattled Muslim-Americans, even those who have lived in the U.S., for generations. One of those communities is in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

3/28: Being Muslim-American in the heartland

3 hours ago

Today on Crosscurrents: Muslim-Americans in the heartland reckon with the sting of national politics. Berkeley foundation awards grants to Muslim-American storytellers

Tune into 91.7 FM at 5:00 P.M.

Listener Holley Wysong wanted to know why new street signs in San Francisco use a typeface with upper and lowercase letters. She asked KALW's collaborative news project Hey Area to find the answer.

By Pixabay user noexcuseradio. Licensed under Creative Commons CC0/cropped.

Major changes in Oakland pot regulations ... Cannabis at the gym ... What’s in your vape pen? ... Woody Harrelson, Grateful Dead ... and more. 

Credit: Alyssa Kapnik Portraiture cropped & edited with permission

Today’s local music is performed by Patrick Galvin. A San Francisco native, he performs classical violin recitals, both solo, and in chamber settings. And he’s in a folk band- but not this week.

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Essig Museum

Mar 23, 2017
Photograph by Kyle Merrit Ludowitz.

This auditory guessing game is part of Audiograph, a crowd-sourced collaborative radio project mapping the sonic signature of each of the Bay Area’s nine counties. By using the sounds of voices, nature, industry, and music, Audiograph tells the story of where you live and the people who live there with you. 

Driving apps like Waze are creating new traffic problems

Mar 23, 2017
Eli Wirtschafter

After a long day teaching at Ohlone College in Fremont, Rose-Margaret Itua often spends 40 minutes just waiting to get on the highway. It’s only a mile – a straight shot down Mission Boulevard to 680. But in the four years Itua has been teaching at the college, this short stretch has become maddeningly slow.

Rachel Wong

One of the first things you hear when you enter the East Bay Vivarium is lots of scratching. It's coming from inside a large cage -- its a giant lizard that’s nearly as long as I am tall. “His name is Elmo, he’s a good guy. People love him,” says Owen Maerks, one of the co-owners here at the Vivarium.

3/23: The unintended consequences of mapping apps

Mar 23, 2017


Mary Rees

Once or twice a month in the East Bay, violinists and bass-players, flautists and trumpeters -- gather to play orchestra music. But instead of a concert hall, they meet in warehouses or museums. No one’s wearing a tie or gown, and the group hasn’t rehearsed. They play a few pieces together and swill free beer between sets.

Courtesy of Scott Kildall/ Waterworks

Chava Kronenberg is on a manhole hunt.

“Oh! Wow! There it is! We have a winner!” she exclaims near the intersection of Geary Boulevard and 5th Avenue in San Francisco.

Zach Pitt-Smith

 

Trombonist and music educator Angela Wellman grew up in one of the cradles of American music: Kansas City, Missouri. Raised in a musical family, surrounded by Kansas City’s rich jazz and blues legacy, it’s no surprise she’s grown up to be a powerful musician and transmitter of that legacy herself.  

CROPPED/RESIZED

What’s this you’re hearing? It’s an Oakland band called Porch. They play alternative rock, with seemingly stream-of-consciousness lyrics. 

3/22: The secret world of cisterns

Mar 22, 2017


Leila Day

Traver Riggins is playing with her toddler Charlie at home in Oakland. Riggins works as a server at a restaurant on the weekends; during the week she takes care of her daughter. She’s also a recently-trained doula.

An Estonian in San Francisco: Silence

Mar 21, 2017

 

Two Estonians sit in a bar. First beer: “So, how have you been?” The other guy just grunts. Second beer: “How’s the family?” The other one grunts again. Third beer: “And how are things at work?” The other guy finally gives in and says, “Did we come here to drink or talk?”

Jenny Gold/KHN

 

“Fake news,” “alternative facts,” travel bans, reports of Russian connections — the daily deluge of political news from Washington can be overwhelming. And for many people, it’s taking a toll. 

3/21: Post-Election Stress Disorder

Mar 21, 2017


McLaren Park in southeastern San Francisco is home to an amphitheater, seven miles of walking trails, sweeping views of San Bruno Mountain and — according to listener Danny Yanow — some "giant birds nests." Yanow wrote into KALW's collaborative reporting project Hey Area asking what kind of birds built them. 

Creative Commons

This story originally aired in August of 2016. 

Kelly Quirke, community engagement coordinator for Harborside Health Center, a medical marijuana dispensary in Oakland, finds it ironic that so many people he deals with in their 60s and 70s are adamant about not getting high on cannabis.

Sarah Tan

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Ben Trefny

When William Scott was sworn in to lead San Francisco’s police department in January, he became a rare chief for the city —one hired from outside the ranks.

@PickerCPUC

The Environmental Protection Agency is one of the hardest-hit agencies in President Trump's preliminary budget. The blueprint slashes the EPA's budget by nearly one third.

Old First Concerts cropped and editted with permission

Today’s local music is by a member of the Jupiter Chamber Players – the ensemble doesn’t have any recordings of its own. Formed in 1997, the group has included several professionals, including members of both the Oakland and San Francisco symphonies.

3/16: San Francisco's new police chief

Mar 16, 2017

Claire Stremple

If you live in the Bay Area, chances are you know about Golden Gate Park. But you might not have heard about San Francisco’s second largest park: McLaren.

A secret community of gardeners in Portola tends to the land

Mar 15, 2017
Kanwalroop Kaur Singh

Most reviews on Yelp are of restaurants. But there’s one that’s a little bit different. It begins like this.

Nicole Grigg

Imagine walking into the Avenue Theater and settling in to watch Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire dance, Humphrey Bogart search for the Maltese Falcon, and Judy Garland and her dog journey from black and white Kansas to technicolor Oz.  

This voice? It belongs to San Francisco native Sara LeMesh. She started writing poetry and songs in her mid-teens. The classically trained Sara LeMesh is part of this year’s Bard Music West festival at the Noe Valley Ministry on Sanchez Street. The festival takes place on Friday and Saturday, March 17 and 18.  

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