Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the award-winning daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the divides in our community - economic, social, and cultural.

Subscribe to our podcast:

  • on iTunes
  • or choose another app, and copy-paste this link into it: http://kalw.org/podcasts/628/rss.xml

Got a comment, tip, or a story we should cover? Email news@kalw.org or give us a call at (415) 264-7106.

The stigma for African Americans in seeking out mental health care.

Alyssa Kapnik Portraiture

“When I look back on my life and I look at the things that I did, they were always people-centered,” says Cedric Jackson. He’s training to become a clinical psychologist, and says it’s something that’s always appealed to him.

Alyssa Kapnik Portraiture

Violinist Danielle Taylor is tall, in her late 20s, with a shaved head and a beanie cap propped to the side. She smiles a lot and upon meeting her for the first time, my instinct is to give her a hug instead of a handshake. When she picks up her violin for an impromptu song, she shifts into a deep calm.

alyssa kapnik portraiture

In many African-American communities, mental health issues have a history of being under-treated and under-diagnosed.

According to the federal government's Office of Minority Health, African-Americans are 20% more likely to experience serious mental health problems than the general population -- but for a number of reasons, including lack of access and limited insurance options -- they're less likely to seek treatment. But there's also something less concrete: there's a stigma attached to needing mental health care in the first place.

Cal Tabuena-Frolli


Audio File
Edit | Remove

  

The Book Report is a new series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear about Kingsley Amis's Lucky Jim from Katherine Ellison, a writer living in San Anselmo. 

Click the audio player above to hear about the book. 

Daily news roundup for Monday, August 31, 2015

13 hours ago
Gabrielle Lurie, Special To The Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California Death Penalty, Struck Down Over Delays, Faces Next Test // The New York Times

"Whether California’s application of the death penalty is so drawn out and arbitrary that it amounts to cruel and unusual punishment will be argued on Monday before a federal appeals court in Pasadena."

"Rags to Riches" by Fat Chops

Aug 30, 2015

Fifteen-year-old Ari Liccardo's artist name is Fat Chops. The song "Rags to Riches" is one of the first songs he ever produced as a musician, and it addresses some of the struggles he's been through in his life.

8/27 - Musical Healing

Aug 28, 2015

Using music to stay off the streets in Richmond, another story from a San Francisco 18 year-old, a Book Report from Adam Johnson, this week's Audiograph game answer, and local musician Tim Hockenberry.

Under CC license from Flickr user: bcrich42

Legalization campaigns need cash… Tribe breaks ties with town police over marijuana… Delivery services aid in education… Are firefighters getting high on the job? … and more.

LEGALIZATION & LEGISLATION

Samson Yee

The Book Report is a series where we talk to local authors about the books they love. Today we hear from Adam Johnson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer living in San Francisco, who is discussing Marlon James' A Brief History of Seven Killings. Johnson's latest collection of stories, Fortune Smileswas released August 18th. 

RYSE Youth Center: A haven for Richmond teens

Aug 27, 2015
A. Mendelson

The city of Richmond has long had a reputation for violence. But things are starting to change. Recently, the city announced its lowest rate of homicide in 33 years. Even so, Richmond continues to be one of the most dangerous cities in the country. For young people seeking refuge from the violence, there’s the RYSE Youth Center. The organization provides a safe space for students to develop their musical talent and express themselves creatively. From the series Generation Change, reporter Anne Hoffman has more. 

Julie Caine

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

We are fairly sure you’ve heard this song, but we are also fairly sure you’ve never heard it sung this way. And maybe you’ve heard this voice: Tim Hockenberry. Hockenberry made it to the semi-finals on “America’s Got Talent” a few years ago.

 Tim Hockenberry will be closing this year’s series of free concerts in the Piccolo Pavilion in Old Corte Madera Square on Sunday (08.30). He is there from 5 to 6:30pm.

Silicon Beat

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

San Francisco Firefighters Become Unintended Safety Net for the Homeless // New York Times

 

"When the emergency bell sounds at Fire Station 1 here, firefighters pull on boots and backpacks, swing into Engine 1 and hurtle out the door in almost a single motion, a blast of red lights and caterwauling sirens. More often than not, there is no fire.

 

8/26 - Giving Care

Aug 26, 2015

Caregivers who lack medical training, another story from an 18 year-old, a Bay Area Beats with Dom Jones, the Rose Garden in San Francisco, and local musician Heather Combs.

No training for in-home caregivers

Aug 26, 2015
Heidi de Marco/KHN

Born just a year apart, Oliver Massengale and his brother Charles grew up together. Now, in a two-story home in Compton, California, they are growing old together. But Charles Massengale, 71, can do little on his own.

The former tree trimmer has severe brain damage from a 30-foot fall, as well as dementia, diabetes and high blood pressure. Six years ago, Oliver took over as his brother’s full-time caregiver, paid about $10 an hour by the state.

It was not a job he was trained to do.

Bay Area Beats: Dom Jones

Aug 26, 2015
Ian Davis

In our latest edition of Bay Area Beats we'll hear from Dom Jones. She came up in East Oakland, writing poetry and singing solos in church on Sundays. She grew up to be a writer, emcee, teacher, youth advocate, IT analyst -- and, the leader of her own music and media “empire”. Really -- the name of the multi-media company she founded and runs is called “Dom Empire”. Jones released her debut album, Wingspan, last year. And this month, she’s starting an entirely new venture: fulfilling a long-held dream and going off to Boston to attend the prestigious Berklee School of Music.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Aug 26, 2015
Kendrick Brinson at SF Chronicle

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

How to solve San Francisco's homeless pooping problem // SF Gate

"While Mayor Ed Lee announced this week that 'the homeless must leave the street' for Super Bowl 50, it's more what they leave behind on the street that is a concern for the million or so people who have to walk a few blocks or a few miles in the city every day.

8/25 - Waste

Aug 25, 2015

The waste of Keurig single-serving coffee pods, illegal dumping in Oakland, and more stories from 18-year-olds.

Todd Whitney

For over a decade, Oakland has attempted to abate the illegal dumping of mattresses, electronics, furniture, and other large items onto city streets. The phenomenon is a problem throughout the Bay Area, but noticeably worse in Oakland.

Single use coffee cups

Aug 25, 2015
Laura Flynn

 

Where do you get your morning cup of coffee? Did you get it at a cafe? Use an old fashion coffee maker, or did you use a single-cup brewing machine? In 2014, single-cup brewing was the fastest growing coffee trend. But what happens to all of the waste created by those individual pods?

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Aug 25, 2015
Mike Koozmin, S.F. Examiner

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 

Police arrest robbery suspect following foot chase through BART tunnels // SF Examiner

“A robbery suspect sent polio on a roughly one-hour foot pursuit through the BART tunnels near the Lake Merritt station today, a BART police lieutenant said.

Poster art on the streets, the Academy of Art in San Francisco profits by violating housing laws, a new series about high school students called "18 in the Bay," and local musician Sony Holland.

http://sfprintcollective.com

When you walk around town, you’re sure to see large posters pasted to construction sites and the sides of buildings. Many are advertisements for movies, records, or cars. Occasionally, you’ll see a poster that isn’t selling anything: It may be there to rally people for a demonstration or make a point about affordable health care. But no matter what the intentions of the poster are, these pieces of public art draw mixed reviews from political artists, store-owners, and city workers. 

T.Dudley

Sony Holland got her start singing for tips at Fisherman’s Wharf and Ghirardelli Square – and notes that that’s where Robin Williams and Carlos Santana started, too!

Sony Holland sings in a fancier place these days: She’s at The Lounge of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in San Francisco on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, starting at 6:30 pm.

Christian Peacock / Forbes

In just over two decades, Academy of Art University in San Francisco has been transformed under President Elisa Stephens. It has expanded from just over 2,000 students to 16,000. Its revenues have also grown from around eight million dollars a year to about $300 million.

18 in the Bay

Aug 24, 2015
Jiro Bevis for Matter

Turning 18 is a big deal. You can rent an apartment, you can get a tattoo, you can vote. Perhaps most importantly, you're legally recognized as an adult.

You might remember that moment yourself, but almost everything else about being that age is changing fast, even in the past few years. So what’s it actually like to be 18 right now?

Daily news roundup for Monday, August 24, 2015

Aug 24, 2015
Suitable 4 Framin's Flickr page

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

SF City Attorney Vows to Wipe Out Serial Graffiti Vandal - SF Bay

“City Attorney Dennis Herrera filed a civil lawsuit against Cozy Terry on Aug. 14 for allegedly causing close to $54,000 of damage to city property with her graffiti tags.

Under CC license from Flickr user: the Vaporizers

Cannabis bill shelved due to cost… Harborside: good news and bad news… Pesticides in concentrates… and more.

LEGALIZATION & LEGISLATION

California’s statewide medical cannabis bill put on hold // EastBayExpress   The widely supported bill was tabled because of it’s $20 million estimated implementation cost.

Heidi de Marco/KHN

People over the age of 65 are one of the largest demographic groups in the country. And here in California, the number of senior citizens is expected to nearly double by 2030. How we care for our aging population is a big question. More and more, elderly and disabled Californians are choosing in-home care rather than living in nursing homes. Reporter Anna Gorman has the story. 

Pages