Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the award-winning daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the divides in our community - economic, social, and cultural.

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Got a general comment, tip, or a story we should cover? Email news@kalw.org or call (415) 264-7106.

Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org

3/14: Curbing waste in the meat industry

Mar 14, 2017


Why is it hard for some black folks to say I love you? The Stoop, a new podcast about black identity, explores this question in a sneak preview of the podcast.

Hey Area: Where are the Mission's buried waterways?

Mar 13, 2017
Image source: http://bit.ly/2nxZBVA

Does a river run through it? 

That's the question that listener Milena Fiore posed to KALW's collaborative news project Hey Area. In this short-answer segment, she speaks with Ginny Stearns, an amateur historian and Mission Creek Creek Conservancy board member, to learn the answer.

3/13: Presenting "The Stoop"

Mar 13, 2017

Why is it hard for some black folks to say I love you? The Stoop, a new podcast about black identity, explores the question in this sneak preview


Guess this Bay Area sound! March 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017
Illustration by Rich Black

This is Audiograph — the Bay Area’s sonic signature. Each week, we’ll play you a sound recorded somewhere in the Bay Area. Your job? Listen to the sound in the player above, figure out where it was recorded and what it is, then call to let us know.

Oakland passes War on Drugs equity program ... Oakland’s past mayor wants to open a dispensary ... Breast milk and cannabis studied ... and more. 

Cari Spivack

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

Leslie Griffy

 

Deep in the heart of high-tech Silicon Valley, there's a woodworker chopping, shaving and carving by hand.

3/9: Is the drought over?

Mar 9, 2017

Photo by CC Flickr user Greg Skidmore, resized and recropped

Karen Musalo is a refugee lawyer and heads the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at U.C. Hastings College of the Law. She spoke with Hana Baba about why she believes President Trump’s executive order, Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States, is problematic.

Eli Wirtschafter

Today is International Women’s Day, and activists called for women to strike worldwide.

In San Francisco this morning, hundreds of women rallied in front of City Hall. Some were mothers who brought their daughters. Many had skipped school or walked off their jobs. 

“An underground songwriting master.”  That’s what the San Francisco Chronicle says about Ruth Gerson, who you’re hearing now. 

3/8: Protecting immigrant rights

Mar 8, 2017


3/7: San Francisco Night Ministry

Mar 7, 2017


San Quentin Prison Report: A day of peace

Mar 7, 2017

Ten years ago, a race riot shook San Quentin State Prison: civilians were evacuated, and prisoners put on lockdown. When the dust settled, a group of prisoners decided to make a change. They formed the Day of Peace Committee. Through open dialogue and the Annual Day of Peace Celebration, the group offers peace as an alternative to violence.

Drew Ackerman works in the Alameda County Public Library system by day, but at night, his Sleep with Me podcast helps listeners around the world fall asleep.

Ian Lewis


Many people living in need rely on churches for meals, support or simply a place to get off the street and rest. But like other types of service centers, churches close their doors at the end of the day. And for those without a home or family to turn to, the night can be a long and difficult time.

 

Judy Silber

 

In the 1980s, hundreds of congregations across the country declared themselves to be sanctuaries, safe havens for refugees fleeing civil war in Central America. Today, there’s a revival underway of that original refugee sanctuary movement, in which churches make themselves sanctuary spaces.

COURTESY OF JOSE ARTIGA

 

President Donald Trump recently issued an executive order promising to halt federal funding for cities that limit cooperation with immigration agents. Some mayors from across the country vowed to remain so called “sanctuary cities” anyway. 

Today’s soothing island sounds come from slack-key guitarist Patrick Landeza. He likes to say he was born on the island of Berkeley.

Guess this Bay Area sound! March 4, 2017

Mar 6, 2017
Illustration by Rich Black

This is Audiograph — the Bay Area’s sonic signature. Each week, we’ll play you a sound recorded somewhere in the Bay Area. Your job? Listen to the sound in the player above, figure out where it was recorded and what it is, then call to let us know.

3/6: The politics of undocumented immigration

Mar 6, 2017

Hey Area: Is Lake Merritt really a lake?

Mar 6, 2017

Is Lake Merritt actually a lake? The answer is no!

A more accurate name might be Lagoon Merritt or Slough Merritt, as it's connected to the salty ocean water of the Bay. In this short-answer segment, reporter Jürgen Klemm dives into the history of Oakland's heart-shaped body of water. 

Trump supporters march in Berkeley

Mar 5, 2017
Cari Spivack

It was business as usual Saturday morning, at the Downtown Berkeley Farmers' Market. Romanesco is in season. Troubadour Mark Ray played his guitar for tips. Then, just a few steps away, at around one o’clock, hundreds of Trump supporters and Trump protesters gathered.

President Trump appointed Ben Carson, the retired neurosurgeon, to run the Department of Housing and Urban Development. This week the Senate advanced his nomination, bringing him one step closer to becoming secretary.

New attorney general dubious about legalization ... Tribal law doesn’t extend to cannabis cup ... Can California’s electric grid handle increased indoor grows? ... and more.

Jeremy Dalmas

While many living in warehouses are worried they could lose their homes, those affected most immediately were the almost two dozen people who lived at the Ghost Ship. They woke up the morning after the fire, to find themselves homeless.

Jeremy Dalmas

 

Events like the one thrown the night of the Ghost Ship fire used to be a regular occurrence all over Oakland. But they’ve virtually died out, because venues fear drawing attention to themselves.

Jeremy Dalmas

 

The Oakland mayor’s office officially knows of 18 large industrial spaces doubling as unpermitted homes, but other estimates say there are dozens more, maybe as many as 60.

Jeremy Dalmas

Instead of ringing the doorbell, when you come by Craig Baldwin’s home on Valencia street, he asks you to stomp on the metal plate in the sidewalk.

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