Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the award-winning daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the divides in our community - economic, social, and cultural.

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Got a general comment, tip, or a story we should cover? Email news@kalw.org or call (415) 264-7106.

Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org

Preserving Maltese heritage in the Portola

May 16, 2017
Greer McVay

If you walk down San Bruno Avenue in the Portola neighborhood, you’ll notice an orange building sitting in the shadow of the Avenue Theater. Right now it’s a Round Table Pizza. However, more than 60 years ago, this building was the Melita Furniture Store. 

Josiah Luis Alderete

A lot of San Francisco neighborhoods have iconic visual identities-- like the Mission district with its colorful murals, or the Fillmore with sidewalk plaques commemorating the “Harlem of the West”. So then what do we see when we  walk down San Bruno Avenue in the Portola district – just down the hill from KALW on the Southeast side of the city?

5/16: San Francisco's Portola neighborhood

May 16, 2017


By Pixabay user TechPhotoGal. Licensed under Creative Commons CC0/cropped.

Trump reserves possibility of prosecution for medical marijuana ...  Two South American pharmacies add cannabis meds ... hearse hides pounds of pot ... and more. 

From CC Flickr user Håkan Dahlström, resized and recropped

San Quentin, the historic prison on the edge of San Francisco Bay, confines about 3,800 inmates.

Rich Black

 

 

The Bay Area is a music-lover’s paradise.

Why does the Bay Area have the worst roads in the country?

May 11, 2017
Eli Wirtschafter

Cat Spediacci takes me on a neighborhood tour of crumbling roads. We’re in Richmond, where she’s lived most of her life. Her Volkswagen rumbles over washboard pavement.

“The road is just completely rotten the way it looks,” says Spediacci. “If I had a tire that looked like this, I would replace it. If I had a fruit that looked like this, I wouldn't eat it.”

The KALW News team is looking for an experienced radio journalism story editor to work on our daily news magazine Crosscurrents. You’ll work in a highly collaborative and supportive newsroom, joining our award-winning team producing long-form features and innovative podcasts.

Claire Stremple

The KALW News team is looking for an experienced radio reporter to provide stories and Q&As about education for our daily news magazine Crosscurrents and to produce spots for our new daily newscasts.

The Specialist: Lice Ladies

May 11, 2017
Kiera Butler

Sofia Deleuse and Pamela Fakui on running a head-lice removal salon and the tips, tricks, and myths they've picked up along the way, including facts you probably never knew about Raid and mayonnaise.

5/11: Why are Bay Area roads so bad?

May 11, 2017


Bringing Black immigrant issues to the forefront

May 10, 2017
Courtesy of Baji, RESIZED AND CROPPED

When you think about immigration and deportation in the US, one population that may not immediately come to mind is Black immigrants from Africa and the Caribbean.

On a corner in San Rafael, day laborers wait — and worry

May 10, 2017
Ninna Gaensler-Debs

You’ve probably seen them: groups of men looking for work, standing in front of Home Depot or waiting on corners of busy thoroughfares. These men are day laborers, looking for short-term work ranging from gardening to painting. On any given day there are almost 120,000 of them looking for work in the United States; about 40 percent are here in California.

Liza Veale

 

Eighteen-year-old Milton* knows all the songs on the radio, even if he can’t pronounce all the words in English. He’s singing along with Christian Ruiz, who along with being his soccer coach and friend, is also Milton's mentor in a million ways, even though at 21 he's just three years older.

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

Like a lot of middle schools, Bret Harte’s hallways carry with them the faint scent of Axe Body Spray and the sounds of kids shuffling to class. The school sits in the middle of Oakland, nestled below the big Mormon Temple. Outside, backpacks dangle from a tall, chain-link fence encircling a busy baseball diamond.

5/10: Making a home in the Bay Area

May 10, 2017

 


Photo by Joen Madonna

 

If you’ve read the San Francisco Chronicle in the last 15 or so years, you probably saw something unique. Once a week, the paper published an illustration called “All Over Coffee” that showed a fresh view of San Francisco, accompanied by words of random insight. 

 

Almost everyone who flies into San Francisco or San Jose airport has seen it -- a vibrant patchwork quilt of colorful water. There, on the southern edge of the San Francisco Bay, you can see bright pinks, pumpkin oranges, neon greens and deep magentas, contrasted against the dark blues of the natural bay water. The last time KALW listener Donna Staton peered out an airplane window, she saw it, too.

 

Jeremy Dalmas

 

San Francisco has the strongest economy of any city in the U.S. And with business booming, a lot of eyes are on local corporations to see if they are giving back to the local community by paying their fair share in taxes.

5/9: Hey Bay Area

May 9, 2017


The science of forgiveness

May 8, 2017
LiveOnceLiveWild.com

 

To forgive is not easy. The brain is wired to repeat offending moments over and over again, and our bodies — they’re programmed to react. Still, Fred Luskin, a psychologist and director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Project says the effort to overcome anger is worth it. 

Tom Levy

About 20% of American Muslims are converts — people who didn’t grow up with the religion and often don’t have any cultural ties.

(Annie Mulligan /Freelancer)

When Miguel Prats revs the engine of his Harley Davidson, it might sound angry to some — but not to him.

5/8: Faith, conversion and forgiveness

May 8, 2017


By NIDA (via Flickr, cropped)

California releases proposed cannabis rules ... Nevada plans legal sales in July ... Federal crackdown not likely (at the moment) ... Schools block cannabis use ... Where DEA thinks teens hide pot ... and more.

Sights & Sounds of East Oakland: Making dad hip hop

May 4, 2017
Bryon Malik

Hip hop music originally captured the spirit of a generation that was young in the 1980s. That generation and others that came after it are no longer young, but many of the people making the music are not ready to call it quits.

Agana Espinoza for RYSE Youth Center

Picture this: It’s the 1940s in North Richmond, California. The city is home to juke joints filled with the sounds of music. This is the setting for the new play Richmond Renaissance – written and performed by the youth at RYSE Center in Richmond.

  • Hip hop veteran Tahajiye Edwards on whether a musical genre ages with the people who make it.
  • A conversation with playwrights Donte Clark and DeAndre Evans about their new play "Richmond Renaissance," which looks to Richmond’s future by celebrating its past.


The Stoop is launching soon! Hosted by KALW journalists Hana Baba and Leila Day, the podcast features stories and conversations about blackness that aren’t always shared in the open.

John Nilsen

Meklit Hadero is an Ethiopian-American musician, singer, songwriter, and composer. She grew up in San Francisco and now makes music that blends jazz with her native Ethiopian music.

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