Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Handout / Wikimedia Commons

California has seen some notorious serial killers over the years, including the Zodiac Killer, the Grim Sleeper, and the Hillside Strangler. But the Golden State Killer might be the most terrifying. 

Casey Miner

In Episode 2 of "The Specialist," we meet Jared McDaniel and Jordan Roberts, acoustics consultants — otherwise known as "the noise police."

Joshua Wirtschafter

In late March, little electric scooters started popping up all over San Francisco. So far the scooter companies have been operating without any kind of permit, but that could change soon.

Sonia Narang

 

21-year-old San Francisco student Isik Berfin has a special bond with her mom. Both are musicians in the Turkish Alevi tradition, which has been passed down in their Kurdish family through generations. Alevism is nominally a branch of Islam, but also has influences from Sufism, Buddhism, Zoroastrianism and shamanism. 

Many people know about the Armenian genocide in Turkey, which was commemorated earlier this week — but fewer are aware that the Alevis have also faced persecution, both historically and in recent years.

The Specialist: Sidewalk canvasser

Apr 26, 2018
Raja Shah

On this episode of The Specialist, we spend a day in the shoes of a sidewalk canvasser.

 Playwright Kelli Kerslake Colaco’s new play, "You Are My Sunshine," is based on a dark story from her own family history. Growing up, Kelli had heard rumors from different family members, and pieced together that one night in 1931, her great-grandfather killed his wife, mother-in-law, and then himself. The show searches for the truth  behind the dark family legend, and is narrated through Woody Guthrie-style folk songs. 

“Right now we’re standing in front of a more arid desert feature,” says my tour guide Darryl Smith. It’s an odd thing to point out in the middle of San Francisco — and the street sounds nearby don’t let you forget that you’re in the heart of the Tenderloin, but as soon as you set foot in this park, you know you’ve walked into a unique space.

It’s clear that owning a home is becoming unaffordable for many Californians — but there’s no single simple explanation for what’s driving up prices.

How changes to the Farm Bill could affect Bay Area food stamps

Apr 24, 2018
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr Creative Commons

 

 

The Farm Bill. It sounds like a bill that deals with … well, farming. But the Farm Bill that’s up for renewal and being debated in Congress right now actually deals with a lot more.

Behind the scenes at the San Francisco Food Bank

Apr 24, 2018
San Francisco and Marin Food Bank

Paul Ash is the executive director of the San Francisco and Marin Food Banks. And he’s taking us on a tour of the main distribution center in Potrero Hill.

When filling out the United States census, Egyptians, Moroccans, Iranians, and many other people from the Middle East and North Africa have always had to check the box 'White' or other. There’s no Middle Eastern or North African box. This is problematic because these communities rely on representation when it comes to things like legislative redistricting and health statistics—in addition to the cultural inaccuracy of calling them white in the American context. 

Jeremy Jue

Nazira Babori moves around The 1951 Coffee Shop with ease: mixing, steaming, and grinding coffee like a pro -- but the truth is, she’s new to this, and not so long ago, she was in a very different place.

The U.S. Census Bureau conducts a new count every decade — and the next one is coming up in 2020. Last month the bureau released the questions they intend to use … and one new question has caused vigorous debate and multiple lawsuits.

4/19: Voting rights for the incarcerated

Apr 19, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

San Quentin Radio: Inmates on the right to vote

Apr 19, 2018
Denise Cross Photography / Flickr / Creative Commons

Holly J. McDede / KALW News

California has some of the strictest gun regulations in the country — and a booming gun industry. More than 1 million firearms were purchased in the state in in 2016, or roughly one gun for every 30 residents.

kgroovy / Flikr Creative Commons

 

Today on Crosscurrents:

Eli Wirtschafter / KALW News

 

A massive, multi-year transit project is transforming International Boulevard in Oakland — and financial aid for local businesses affected by the project is tangled up in red tape.

 

Jeremy Dalmas

This story originally aired in May of 2017.

San Francisco has the strongest economy of any city in the United States. And with business booming, a lot of eyes are on local corporations to see if they are giving back to the local community by paying their fair share in taxes.

Lydia Daniller

 

Sean Dorsey is a trailblazing transgender choreographer, and the founder of Fresh Meat Productions, an annual transgender and queer performance festival.

 

Sean has a new show premiering in San Francisco this week called Boys In Trouble. The show comes out of two years of research, during which Sean traveled across the country, hosting community forums about masculinity and interviewing people about gender.

 

In Estonia, tax filing is done in one minute

Apr 17, 2018

A couple of weeks ago I received an email reminding me that it would soon be time to file my U.S. tax return for 2016. The email said that first and foremost, I’d have to locate my W-2 form showing my earnings and taxes for last year.

StoryCorps: Two moms, double the love

Apr 17, 2018
StoryCorps

Lamar Van Dyke, Paula Lewis and Traci Lewis have a special bond. Lamar gave birth to Traci when she was 18 years old. Unprepared to have a baby, she gave Traci up for adoption. Paula Lewis adopted her. Traci sat down with her biological mom, Lamar, and her adopted mom, Paula, at the StoryCorps booth at the San Francisco Public Library to talk about their family.

Click the audio player above to hear the story.

This interview was facilitated by Geraldine Ah-Sue, and produced for KALW by Chris Hambrick. It originally aired in May of 2015. 

Robert Huffstutter / Flikr / Creative Commons

 

The redevelopment of the Hunters Point Shipyard is slated to be San Francisco’s biggest redevelopment project since the 1906 earthquake.

 

The Shipyard is a former naval base and nuclear-weapons testing lab — and the cleanup of radioactive materials used there has been ongoing for decades.

 

Courtesy of Brava Center For The Arts

 

Artist Beatrice Thomas performs in drag as soulful death-metal diva Black Benatar at Drag Queen Story Time at the San Francisco Public Library — and all over the Bay.

 

She’ll be hosting Black Benatar’s Black Magic Cabaret as part of So Soul San Francisco at Brava Theater this week.

 

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