Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the award-winning daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the divides in our community - economic, social, and cultural.

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Got a comment, tip, or a story we should cover? Email news@kalw.org or give us a call at (415) 264-7106.

William Rhodes

 

In 2008, artist William Rhodes moved to San Francisco from Baltimore. Immediately after arriving, he noticed the exodus of Black folks leaving the city and decided to co-found the Three Point Nine Collective in an attempt to bring together the city's Black artists. He speaks with KALW's Todd Whitney about one of his works of art.

 

 

    

 

 

 

Robert F. Oaks

 

San Francisco's reputation as one of America's most ethnically diverse cities is in question as its African Americans population erodes. In 1990, 11% of city residents were Black. Now that number is just 6% and is expected to drop below 4% by 2020.

A history (and population decline) of Black San Francisco: the 3.9 Collective, Black artists in the city, The Last Black Man in San Francisco, and local musicians The Chamber Music Society of San Francisco.

Today's local music is by the Chamber Music Society of San Francisco. The group formed in 2013 to perform great chamber music repertoire in intimate settings, the way they believe it was meant to be heard.  The Chamber Music Society of San Francisco can be heard this Friday, July 24th, at the Presidio Officers’ Club starting at 6 pm. Admission is free.

Daily News roundup for Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Jul 22, 2015
Rich Pedroncelli / AP

 

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Supes move forward with jail that we might not need // 48 Hills

"The San Francisco supervisors today moved forward a proposal for a new $240 million county jail – although it’s not clear yet what the project will actually look like or whether the city needs it.

Parg / Flickr

The KALW News team is looking for an experienced and creative sound engineer/sound designer to help mix our daily news magazine Crosscurrents.

kevinberne.com

 

There’s a disturbing national trend many call the school-to-prison pipeline -- where students, often low-income children of color, are pushed out of school and into the criminal justice system. That’s the subject of actress and playwright Anna Deavere Smith’s new show at Berkeley Repertory Theater, “Notes From the Field: Doing Time in Education, the California Chapter”. The show uses Smith’s signature style of documentary theater, where she interviews people and then performs their words verbatim, using her acting skills to embody their voices and mannerisms.

Americans' weak grasp of geography and schools trying to change that, documentary theater and audience participation, and local musicians The Oakland East Bay Gay Men's Chorus.

Hana Baba

Americans are often stereotyped as not knowing much about the rest of the world.  But, according to the numbers, it’s more than a mere stereotype. In the latest national geographic poll of geographic knowledge, American 18- to 24-year-olds place almost last, second only to Mexico.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Jul 21, 2015
Ted Friedman

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Oakland still wading in trash; council delays action // Oakland Tribune

"The City Council on Monday delayed making changes to Oakland's unpopular trash contract after weeks of complaints from residents and business owners over higher garbage rates, saying it needed more information before taking action on the deal.

StoryCorps: A soldier returns from Iraq

Jul 20, 2015

Ryan Garrett joined the military right out of high school. His sister, Samantha, asks him about what it was like leaving​​ home for the first time to serve in Iraq, and ​the ​​difficulties of adjusting ​after he returned. During this StoryCorps conversation, Samantha gets to know a brother she hardly knew but greatly admired.

Todd Whitney

When Chris Magnus took over the Richmond Police Department in 2006, he was tasked with cutting back violent crime in what was then known as one of America’s most dangerous cities.

Claude Shade

 

The T Sisters are a contemporary folk band from Oakland, California. Songwriters Erika, Rachel and Chloe Tietjen are joined on stage by upright bassist Steve Height and Andrew Allen Fahlander on mandolin and guitar. The vocally-driven five piece will perform at the Sixth Annual “Backyard Concert” taking place Saturday afternoon, July 25th, in Santa Rosa. Doors open at 4pm.

 

Richmond Thinking Outside the Box; 3D printed prosthetics are fashion statements for amputees;  Storycorps: A soldier returns from Iraq; and local band the T Sisters.

Angela Johnston

When Deborah Bevilacqua lost her leg in a motorcycle accident ten years ago, she had to get a prosthetic leg. It’s been functional she says, but it’s not pretty.

“It’s a big black bulky thing with a big black bulky other thing attached to it, and a big grey metal bulbous ball...that's for rotation and shock, but looks kind of like the Epcot Center.”

Daily news roundup for Monday, July 20, 2015

Jul 20, 2015
Giancarlo Thomae, KayakWhaleWatching.com

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news

California drought: Here's the secret weapon to curb water hogs -- the flow restrictor // Mercury News
"It's a question that keeps coming up as California's drought drags on: What should cities and water agencies do about the most egregious water wasters?

Under CC license from Flickr user [Don Goofy.

Another recreational ballot iniative announced… Drought becomes a campaign issue… Group calls on RICO Act to stop marijuana sales… Terry Gross hears about medical marijuana… and more.

LEGALIZATION & LEGISLATION

Ted Muldoon

 All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

 

LGBTQ rights made huge strides recently with the supreme court’s historic decision on same-sex marriage. But an ongoing situation in San Francisco’s Mission District shows that there’s still pushback, even in the most liberal of cities.

Refinery healing walks connect communities

Jul 16, 2015
Lezak Shallat

This summer, many East Bay residents are drawing attention to the dangers of living next door to the oil industry. Borrowing from a Native American tradition of healing walks, they are walking to all five refineries along the northeastern shores of the San Francisco Bay.

Standing on the bridge over the Carquinez Straits connecting the San Pablo and Suisun Bays, two Native American women -- Penny Opal Plant and Alison Ehara-Brown -- sing a song of healing.

The Mission reacts to a hate crime against an LGBT mural, Richmond residents worried about oil refinery projects, this week's Audiograph game answer, and local musician Kim Nalley.

Today’s local music is by blues and jazz vocalist Kim Nalley. A review of one of her shows in Moscow called her “The Pearl of San Francisco.”

 Kim Nalley will be the SFJazz Center tomorrow (07.17). She plans a tribute concert honoring Billie Holiday. That show starts at 7:30pm.

Jazz Perspective: Arturo Sandoval

Jul 15, 2015
Flickr user BRIC

Musician Arturo Sandoval is the protege of Dizzy Gillespie and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Sandoval is most famous for his jazz and Latin trumpet playing, but in this Jazz Perspective producer Reese Erlich gets Sandoval to talk about how he composed music for 12 films, including his Grammy-nominated work on The Mambo Kings.

Knowing when Ramadan is over, the search for life beyond Earth, jazz musician Arturo Sandoval, and local musician Will Magid.

courtesy of SETI

In the 1997 film Contact, you’ll recall a scene where Jodie Foster, playing alien-hunting astronomer Ellie Arroway, lies on her car hood with huge headphones on her ears, in a field of towering white satellite dishes. She’s waiting for something. A signal. She lies still, her eyes closed. And suddenly, she hears something, the sounds of something – someone  – beyond the earth, communicating with her.

Well, that was just a movie, based on the novel Contact by Carl Sagan. But the character of Ellie Arroway was not all fictional. It was based on a real live female astronomer, Jill Tarter. Tarter’s a pioneer for American women astronomers, and the former director of the SETI Institute. Since she was a little girl, she’s been fascinated by what else, or who else is out there. And she still is.

Hana Baba

About 20 Muslim families are gathered on a hilltop outside the Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley, just after sunset. A water fountain bubbles, women and men chat, kids run around with snacks in their hands, and everyone at some point or another, looks up to the sky. They are moonsighting, scanning the sky for the new crescent moon that will signify the beginning of the month, Ramadan. 

SQPR: Meet the reporters

Jul 15, 2015
Nigel Poor

Introducing the reporters of the San Quentin Prison Report!

Click "Related Content" below to hear their stories. 

Today's Local Music: Will Magid

Jul 15, 2015

Who's this you’re hearing?  That would be Will Magid, trumpeter, producer and DJ, from Palo Alto. He likes to collect sounds, which he then layers into compositions both strange and familiar.  Will Magid has a free show tomorrow (07.16). It's taking place at San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Gardens, starting at 12:30 in the afternoon. It’s part of the 15th annual Yerba Buena Gardens Festival

Bobb Harris picked this song because it reminds him of how hard his father worked to support his family.

This band?  It's The Coup. Critics call front man, rapper Boots Riley, "a national treasure" and "some kind of genius." Check out their upcoming concert here.

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