Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We are part of KALW's Public Interest Reporting Project, which began in 2003 with the goal of expanding local in-depth reporting – at a time when most news organizations were cutting back on public interest journalism.

Subscribe to the Crosscurrents podcast here.

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8:24am

Fri October 4, 2013
Transportation

Californians want benefits of high-speed rail, not the price tag

A sign in Kings County, California declaring opposition to the state's planned high-speed rail
J. Stephen Conn via Flickr

A majority of Californians don’t want the state’s controversial high-speed rail line, says a recent poll forUSC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times. But at the same time, over two thirds of the voters surveyed said they think the project would create jobs and help the state’s economy. And 61% said a high-speed rail line would help reduce traffic at airports and on the highways. 

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5:54pm

Thu October 3, 2013
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: October 3, 2013

Black Power TV, Dimensions Dance provides 40 years of African American dance, this week's Audiograph game answer, and local musicians The Brothers Comatose.

5:35pm

Thu October 3, 2013

5:35pm

Thu October 3, 2013
Arts & Culture

Celebrating 40 years of dancing the African diaspora

Jen Chien

 

The pulse of drums spills out onto the street from an upper window of the Malonga Casquelord Center for the Arts, a big Art Deco building in the Lakeside district of Oakland. Up on the third floor, a battery of eight drummers is lined up against one wall of a large dance studio, vibrating the air with their music.

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5:15pm

Thu October 3, 2013
Arts & Culture

Black Power TV

Photograph of Say Brother Crew at Dudley Station
Photographer: Morris Alston, http://blackpowertv.com/

When you turn on your television set today, you're bombarded with all kinds of shows - sitcoms, reality shows, news, sports, and political debates. And, you’ll probably see a lot of different kinds of people. Today, television is culturally diverse, but it wasn't always so. African Americans didn't really have a strong television presence until- well, what's the first black TV show you remember?

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