Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org

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5/16: Stories from inside prison

May 16, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

The first weeks of freedom

May 16, 2018
Marissa Ortega-Welch

Anouthinh “Choy” Pangthong worked with KALW’s San Quentin Radio program for a couple years. Choy’s been in prison since he was 15. Then last month, after serving 22 years behind bars, he was released on parole.

Ninna Gaensler-Debs / KALW News

Since 2013, KALW News producers have been going into San Quentin State Prison to train incarcerated men to be radio reporters. We air the stories they produce there as San Quentin Radio.

Making art from San Quentin's Death Row

May 16, 2018
Photo Melissa Ysais (2018) / Courtesy of The William A. Noguera Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

 

About 750 incarcerated people have been sentenced to death in California. One of them is William Noguera. He’s a Colombian-American who grew up in a suburb of L.A, and he’s spent nearly 30 years on San Quentin’s Death Row after murdering his girlfriend’s mother when he was a teenager.

Today on Crosscurrents:

Shizue Seigel

Gentrification may be changing the racial demographics of San Francisco. But census data show people of color makeup over half of the city’s population.

Eli Wirtschafter

 

Oakland resident Shaniesa Williams wrote to Hey Area — KALW’s community-journalism project — to ask why there are so few traffic signals on International Boulevard.

5/14: A school in Redwood City averts closure

May 14, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

Handout / Center for Youth Wellness

When we experience trauma as children — whether it’s the stress of an abusive parent, divorce, substance abuse, or the effects of poverty — do these traumatic events affect our lives even when we grow up?

Gloria Rangel

The Redwood City School District superintendent’s letter to parents of Fair Oaks Elementary school came in late March. The school, he wrote, was facing near certain closure.

5/10: What does it mean to be a public charge?

May 10, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

 

According to Pew Research, 75 percent of Americans have smartphones. Most of us are using them for GPS directions, and about 70 percent of Americans are on some kind of social media.  Roughly two thirds on Facebook.

Ninna Gaensler-Debbs / KALW News

 

A leaked document from the Department of Homeland Security proposes to make it more difficult for immigrants who use public services to remain in the United States.

5/9: Victory Outreach

May 9, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

Alexa Denton

 

A 2015 industry survey found that about 80 percent of those working in publishing are white.

5/8: The hidden life of California's rice

May 8, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

  • How rice farmers in California are trying to prove that agriculture and wildlife can co-exist.
  • We'll learn about the flavorful Japanese mold you might not know you’re eating, and meet the woman who brings it to life.

Jim Morris/California Rice Commission

 

Before the Gold Rush, the Central Valley in California was like a bathtub. Rivers filled with water which then slowly spread out through natural wetlands. This created a rich feeding ground for migrating species: salmon going to and from the ocean, birds flying from Alaska and Argentina.

Cari Spivak

 

On Saturdays, Mariko Grady’s company, Aedan Fermented Foods, has a food stall at the San Francisco Ferry Plaza Farmers Market.

Leslie Griffy

Getting around sprawling Santa Clara County is a trick for anyone, but for those without housing, getting to and from services and opportunities is even tougher. That’s where Good Karma Bikes comes in. On Saturdays, the volunteer and job-training cycling clinic and store does free repairs on bikes brought in by homeless folks.

The Specialist: Ice Guy

May 3, 2018
Hari Simons

Our specialist this week is Richard Rocha, Director of Operations for the San Jose Sharks’ practice rink — otherwise know as the “ice guy” for the Bay Area’s only professional hockey team.

 

Later this month, Starbucks plans to close down 8,000 of its stores to train its employees on implicit bias. This comes after a manager kicked two Black men out of a Starbucks in Philadelphia in April.

Image cropped and reused from Wikiemedia Commons

Over the past few decades, the San Francisco skyline has undergone a transformation. It's building up.

San Francisco now has over 100 buildings taller than 240 feet, and more are on the way. But many are being built on sandy, unstable ground, known for their high risk of behaving like quicksand during an earthquake.

Lisa Morehouse

“Hard work, low pay, miserable conditions, and more!”

Think of a ghost town, and San Francisco Bay is not likely to come to mind. Yet the remnants of such a place are currently sinking into the marshes near Fremont. Back in the 1920s, the settlement of Drawbridge boasted about 90 buildings, most having some connection to duck hunting.

5/1: Beyoncé Mass

May 1, 2018

Coming up today on Crosscurrents:

Asal Ehsanipour / KALW News

 

Last Wednesday, Grace Cathedral hosted an event that got national attention: a Beyoncé Mass.

Handout / Wikimedia Commons

California has seen some notorious serial killers over the years, including the Zodiac Killer, the Grim Sleeper, and the Hillside Strangler. But the Golden State Killer might be the most terrifying. 

Casey Miner

In Episode 2 of "The Specialist," we meet Jared McDaniel and Jordan Roberts, acoustics consultants — otherwise known as "the noise police."

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