Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We are part of KALW's Public Interest Reporting Project, which began in 2003 with the goal of expanding local in-depth reporting – at a time when most news organizations were cutting back on public interest journalism.

Subscribe to the Crosscurrents podcast here.

Got a comment, tip, or a story we should cover? Email news@kalw.org or give us a call at (415) 264-7106.

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6:47pm

Thu September 12, 2013
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: September 12, 2013

A special getting to know the people in your neighborhood edition of Crosscurrents, featuring special guest co-host, columnist Gary Kamiya: Trees take root in the Tenderloin; Keeping memories of Chinatown alive – and kicking! Lit Slam brings poetry slam to the page; and Hear Here: Meet DaJuan Simpson.

To subscribe to the Crosscurrents podcast in iTunes, click here. To use another podcasting tool, click here.

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6:20pm

Thu September 12, 2013
Arts & Culture

Lit Slam brings poetry slam to the page

If you think you want to launch a new poetry slam, first take a walk through the Bay Area. Your cutting edge idea may have already been done. In San Francisco, SoMa’s Brainwash Cafe has called dibs on hosting an open mic in a laundromat. Quiet Lightning has taken poets everywhere in San Francisco, including to a sporting goods store. Oakland’s Tourettes Without Regrets has trademarked the Burlesque show-dirty haiku contest combo. Each slam is different, but finger snapping, occasional jeering, and cash prizes have become the slam standard. If Roman Gladiators were handed poetry and told they had to bring the crowd to their feet or be fed to the lions, it would look like a poetry slam.

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5:43pm

Thu September 12, 2013
Arts & Culture

Keeping memories of Chinatown alive – and kicking!

Courtesy of Grant Avenue Follies

From the 1940s until the 1960s, San Francisco’s Chinatown was home to a thriving Chinese American nightclub scene. The clubs had names like Forbidden City, the Chinese Skyroom, and the Shanghai Low. They had showgirls, ballroom duos, comedians, jazz singers, and magic acts -- all featuring Asian-American entertainers. These clubs had wide appeal: celebrities like Bing Crosby, Duke Ellington, and Lauren Bacall were all spotted over the years, along with tourists, businessmen and locals. The Forbidden City even inspired a novel, by C.Y. Lee, which was later turned into the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “Flower Drum Song”.

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4:05pm

Thu September 12, 2013
Economy/Labor/Biz

Youth Radio: Life lessons from laundry

Listen to this story here. 

Teenagers are three times more likely to be unemployed in this country than adults. In Castro Valley, California there aren’t that many newspaper routes or lawns to mow.  But I was able to land a gig close to home, fixing washers and dryers with Grandpa.

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3:36pm

Thu September 12, 2013
Health, Science, Environment

East Bay Express: When you can't understand your doctor

Gloria Estela Ortiz Ramos doesn't speak English, so when she became ill in 2006 and needed medical care, she had to rely on her ten-year-old son for help. He translated a list of medication prescribed to her from the Eastmont Wellness Center, an East Oakland clinic that serves low-income people. But the El Salvadoran immigrant said she expressed concerns to her medical provider, because her son had just started to learn English himself.

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