Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We are part of KALW's Public Interest Reporting Project, which began in 2003 with the goal of expanding local in-depth reporting – at a time when most news organizations were cutting back on public interest journalism.

Subscribe to the Crosscurrents podcast here.

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5:33pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Crosscurrents

Crosscurrents: October 30, 2012

The Korean-American vote, police funding and Oakland's District 1, how to become a write-in candidate, democrat vs. democrat in the election for California's 15th congressional distrcit, and local musicians Tokyo Raid.

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5:15pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Cops & Courts

Dispatches from the Inside: Separation and psychosis

Credit California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Richard Gilliam is incarcerated at the California Men's Colony (CMC).

October 1, 2012

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1:54pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Cops & Courts

What ending the death penalty means for inmates

California Proposition 34, on the ballot this November, would abolish the death penalty and replace it with life without the possibility of parole. The Attorney Donald Heller originally wrote the ballot measure that reinstated the death penalty in California in 1978. Heller now supports Proposition 34.  

San Quentin inmate Troy Williams interviewed Heller by phone about his change of heart.

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12:16pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Arts & Culture

Today's Local Music: Tokyo Raid

Credit Dan Brazelton

What’s that you’re hearing?  You might think it’s Depeche Mode or maybe Joy Division. But it’s actually the Oakland band Tokyo Raid.  They’re the headliners on Saturday, November 3rd at the Stork Club in Oakland.

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6:00pm

Mon October 29, 2012
Cops & Courts

Dispatches from the Inside: Living in a criminal/victim world

The California Men's Colony (CMC)
Credit Credit California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation

Inmate Richard Gilliam has been sending us dispatches to let the general public know what life is like for California’s roughly 136,000 prisoners.  Gilliam starts today by talking about the effects of the civil rights movement on inmate life.

GILLIAM: It was due to fears about prisoner empowerment and social-recognition that politicians and law enforcement officials began a vilification campaign of criminals. They acheived this by positing criminals  – and by extension prisoners – opposite the victims of crime.

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