Crosscurrents | KALW

Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is KALW Public Radio's award-winning news magazine, broadcasting Mondays through Thursdays on 91.7 FM. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the economic, social, and cultural divides in our community.

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Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, immigration@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org

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4/12: What happens when winter shelters close?

Apr 12, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents: 

  • As a winter shelter prepares to close for the season, 90 homeless residents of Berkeley return to the streets
  • A nonprofit wants to help the whole city of San Francisco explore the big questions of life and death
  • What inspires some volunteers who care for the dying

  

Tracy Grubbs grew up fascinated, curious and also afraid of death. Her curiosity, plus her interest in Buddhism led her to volunteer at the Zen Hospice Project, a San Francisco center for the dying supported by the Buddhist community. Grubbs spoke with her colleague Lisa Messano.

4/11: The fight to reform Proposition 13

Apr 11, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

Liza Veale

 

If you’ve heard of Proposition 13, you probably know that it cut property taxes back in 1978, which reduced funding for public schools and other services. It also has a lot to do with the state’s shortage of housing and, many argue, the fact that rents are so darn high.

Photo couresty of Liam Dillon

Liam Dillon covers state politics and policy for the LA Times. He spoke with KALW's Ben Trefny about the split roll campaign to reform Proposition 13 — which was just postponed to the 2020 ballot — and how that reform fits in with other proposed initiatives to address the state's housing crisis. 

4/10: A new opportunity for returning migrants

Apr 10, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents: 

Ninna Gaensler-Debs

 

When migrants are deported, or return to Mexico City by choice, their job opportunities can be limited, and social stigma can make them feel isolated. Hola Code aims to change all that — through coding.

Palo Alto Daily Post, Emily Mibach

 

In June 2014, the Redwood City School District voted unanimously to approve two new charter schools within its boundaries, bringing the total to three. Hundreds of largely immigrant parents had demanded the choice, hoping for higher test scores, college access, and career-readiness for their kids.

 

But the decision came with a cost.  

 

Bay Area Beats: NRVS LVRS

Apr 10, 2018
Courtesy of NRVS LVRS

San Francisco band NRVS LVRS is the married music duo of Bevin Fernandez and Andrew Gomez. The couple released their sophomore album “Electric Dread” in 2017 and recently returned from touring Europe to promote the project.

Dancing in church, a new kind of praise

Apr 9, 2018
Leila Day

In some churches when the music starts, so does the praise dancing.

Dancers stand near the choir or the pulpit and perform choreographed routines that mix ballet, modern, and jazz. They are often young girls, who practice every movement and their focus is to praise.

Jake McCluskey

He was once a noted local expert on craft beers — and facing multiple health risks due to weighing almost 400 pounds. But Jake mcCluskey changed his life with an athletic journey that took him thousands of miles — without ever leaving town.

Eli Wirtschafter

Activist Lateefah Simon ran for the BART Board of Directors, and won, in part because of the killing of Oscar Grant. She’s now helping the agency navigate troubled waters following the killing by BART police of another young, unarmed black man — Sahleem Tindle.

4/9: The politics of public transit and displacement

Apr 9, 2018

Coming up today on Crosscurrents:

4/5: California lawmakers weigh police reform

Apr 5, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

Kevin Cortopassi / Flikr Creative Commons

Since Sacramento police shot and killed Stephon Clark in his grandmother’s backyard last month, protests have taken to the streets almost everyday.

Courtesy of the artist

Oakland-based singer/songwriter Madeline Kenney released her debut album, “Night Night at the First Landing," last year, and has since taken it on tour around the country. To support her music, she’s worked as a bread baker, a nanny, a piano teacher, and a volunteer at the Women's Audio Mission in San Francisco.

Zeina Nasr

 

Tiny Telephone is a recording studio in San Francisco’s Mission District committed to making analog recordings on tape, maintaining affordable rates, and welcoming a diverse range of local and international musicians into its colorful, creative, and caffeine-enhanced world.

San Quentin Radio: The barbers of San Quentin

Apr 4, 2018

Getting a haircut can make a person feel good. For the men in San Quentin, it's no different. Some of the barbers are paid to cut hair. Others volunteer to do so. It can be a complex process, but it's important in the prison environment.

Joe Fitz of SF Examiner

Yesterday, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved a resolution to formally oppose a state bill which is being called the most controversial housing bill in decades. The Transit-Rich Housing Bonus, if passed, would force cities and counties to allow for dense and tall housing near public transit—no matter what local laws say. Here’s why San Francisco leaders are putting up such a fight against it. 

Asal Ehsanipour

Zoroastrianism is a monotheistic faith that began in ancient Iran over 3,000 years ago. The Bay Area happens to be a hub for the Zoroastrian community, whose global population has dwindled to just over 100,000. With Nowruz (Persian New Year) celebrations winding down, KALW’s Asal Ehsanipour set out to explore her roots by learning more about modern-day Zoroastrians in the Bay Area.

Today on Crosscurrents:

Jeff Foster

There’s Wifi and Tesla, Cheerios and Cocoa Puff. There are three registered Clintons, and thirteen Bernies. Those are just some of the names of registered dogs residing in San Francisco, where the city's 120,000 canines famously outnumber its children.

The fast and the furious world of pigeon racing

Apr 3, 2018
Photo by Geraldine Ah-Sue

This piece originally aired in 2016.

Bill Milestone says you can tell when a pigeon is happy. They get frisky with energy. They squabble with each other. They get, he says, a sparkle in their eye.

Milestone is training his flock of forty for an upcoming race. They live in a small white house on stilts in the backyard of his San Francisco home, cooing over each other. 

San Quentin Radio: Autism Behind Bars

Apr 3, 2018
Flickr user Michael LoRusso / Cropped and reused under CC license: https://bit.ly/2Ehdqjd

Autism is extremely hard to diagnose, because it can’t be tested for blood or genes. It’s a behavioral disorder. Often a parent or teacher has to notice the signs and request that a child is tested. Many people are living their lives without realizing they have autism. This includes people in prison.

4/3: Dogs on Trial

Apr 3, 2018

Today on Crosscurrents:

Marissa Ortega-Welch/KALW

 

This is the first story in our four-part series “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area  

A 2017 Reuters report showed that a few Bay Area neighborhoods have some of the highest rates of childhood lead poisoning in the country.

Angela Johnston

 

This is the second story in our four-part series  “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area,” an in-depth look at childhood lead poisoning in the Bay Area.

Marissa Ortega-Welch

 

This is the third story in our four-part series  “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area,” an in-depth look at childhood lead poisoning in the Bay Area.

The numbers show the lead poisoning problem in the Bay Area is bad — but is what we know just the tip of the iceberg?

Angela Johnston

 

This is the last story in our four-part series “Persistent Poison: Lead’s Toxic Legacy in the Bay Area.”  

In Alameda County, which has some of the highest lead levels in the country, an energetic public health nurse helps families after their child has been lead poisoned. But her work is a stopgap solution. What’s the answer to preventing leading poisoning before it starts?

3/29: Persistent Poison — A solution within reach

Mar 29, 2018

 

Today on Crosscurrents: 

  • Part four in our investigative series, Persistent Poison, examining lead poisoning in the Bay Area

Tune in to 91.7 FM on Thursday at 5p.m.  

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