Crosscurrents

Monday-Thursday at 5pm

Crosscurrents is the award-winning daily news magazine from KALW Public Radio. We make joyful, informative stories that engage people across the divides in our community - economic, social, and cultural.

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Got a general comment, tip, or a story we should cover? Email news@kalw.org or call (415) 264-7106.

Email Crosscurrents' beat reporters directly at economy@kalw.org, education@kalw.org, energy@kalw.orgenvironment@kalw.org, health@kalw.org, housing@kalw.org, justice@kalw.org, transportation@kalw.org

GEORGE GASCON TALK USF IMAGE BY FLIKR USER SHAWN, WITH CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE.

 

If you can’t afford bail in this country, you get stuck in jail until your trial. Many have said it’s a system that's biased against the poor.

Audiograph's Sound of the Week: Casting Club

Jan 26, 2017
Photo by Ian Lewis

Here's the sound we played as a clue. We asked you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it. 

Lincoln Adler

Have you ever wondered what becomes of members of boys choruses once they grow up? Well, in the case of Berkeley native Kurt Ribak, he became a jazz musician.  The Kurt Ribak Trio, who you’re hearing now, take the stage Friday at Armondo’s in Martinez, starting at 8 p.m.

1/26: San Francisco looks to update its bail system

Jan 26, 2017

 


Cropped and used under CC license from Flickr user Amy the Nurse


Donald Trump signed two executive orders that had to do with undocumented immigration today.

Rob Peterson

Tunisia stands alone among the nations that went through Arab Spring revolutions, in successfully forging and sustaining a democratic government after toppling a dictator.

Holly McDede

 

Last week, some of the Bay Area’s most celebrated authors came together to share their thoughts about our own democratic moment. The event, presented by Litquake, was called “No Shadow Without Light: Writers Respond to Trump.”

1/25: Bay Area writers respond to Trump

Jan 25, 2017

 

Lila Blue, who you’re hearing now, has lived in San Francisco about a third of her life, yet she’s only been here since 2011. How’s that possible? Lila Smith is only 16 years old. Her first instrument was the ukulele. Now she also plays guitar, bass and piano.

Image courtesy of Daphne Matziaraki

 

Daphne Matziaraki's film 4.1 Miles captures a day in the life of a Greek Coast Guard Captain whose job is to try to save refugees trying to cross the Aegean Sea. It was featured as a New York Times Op-Doc, won a Student Academy Award, and it’s been nominated for an Oscar.

Judy Silber

Anyone at the Bay Area Women's Marches on Saturday couldn't help but notice the quantity and variety of signs held by protestors. Here are some that were on public display in Oakland and San Francisco.

Most Americans are unprepared for the worst to happen—an accident or an unexpected illness that leaves them brain dead, but still alive.  That's what happened to Terri Schiavo, a young woman who became comatose after suffering a heart attack in 1990.  

Miranda Penn Turin

 

 

The Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are both in their 80s. During a week in 2015, the two spiritual leaders came together in Dharamsala, India to reflect. They discussed joy in the face of hardship, a topic both men know well.

Some, Done or None: Fasting for wisdom

Jan 24, 2017
"Titicaca Lake" by Flickr user Olivier Gryson. Cropped and resized under CC: http://bit.ly/2kpfFM9

 

KALW's Spiritual Edge project is interested in how ordinary people cultivate spirituality in their lives. To bring our findings to the air, we’ve been interviewing Bay Area residents about religion. 

Dear Donald Trump: "I do not think you are the next Hitler"

Jan 24, 2017

Over the weekend, the historic Women's March on Washington drew huge crowds to the nation's capital, with satellite marches taking place all over the world — including here in the Bay Area

The music you’re hearing now is being performed by the Chamber Music Society of San Francisco. This group has a passion for playing in intimate settings, which brings performers and listeners closer together.

1/24: "Advanced directives" for the end of life

Jan 24, 2017

  • Just one third of Americans have a document spelling out their end-of-life medical wishes. 
  • A local author spent a week with the Dalai Lama and the Archbishop Desmond Tutu.
  • Looking for enlightenment through fasting.


Ask an Estonian: A new president of the U.S.?

Jan 23, 2017

Our news department has a visiting journalist this year, Jürgen Klemm, a professional broadcaster from Estonia. His nation borders Russia; in fact, Estonia was part of the Soviet Union until 1991. Jürgen has seen the allegations of Russian involvement in the US election. And he's heard President Trump's statements about NATO. We realized we can learn a lot from Jürgen's perspective, so we're debuting this new segment, 'Ask an Estonian.'

Cropped and used under CC license from Flickr user Evan HB

One of President Trump’s very first official acts was to sign an executive order stating it will be the policy of his Administration to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The way it was phrased was kind of like those Bay Area ballot measures that may or may not make a difference, like, “The San Francisco Board of Supervisors denounce the war in Iraq”; in other words, it doesn’t actually put anything definitive into effect. But Congress is already responding to that, and opponents of the ACA are looking for ways to cut costs.

Photo courtesy of Pui Ling Tam

On Saturday, officials in Washington D.C. estimate half-a-million people took part in the Women’s March. Among those who traveled to the nation’s capital for the event were 16 young women of color from the San Francisco Unified School District.

Jason Clark, the chairman of the San Francisco Republican Party, is optimistic about the new administration despite the vitriol of the campaign. Clark, who is gay, spoke with KALW's Julie Caine about President Trump's position on LGBTQ rights and "coming out" as a Republican.

Holly McDede

Some of the Bay Area’s most celebrated writers met up at the San Francisco Main library last week to share their ideas on the state of the world. It was a Litquake event called “No Shadow Without Light: Writers Respond to Trump.” 

1/23: The Bay Area under Trump

Jan 23, 2017

  • Bay Area voices from the Washington, D.C. and local protests.
  • Perspective from Jason Clark, the  chairman of the San Francisco Republican Party.
  • Writers respond to Trump.
  • How President Trump's first actions will affect the Bay Area. 
  • The first in our series "Ask an Estonian."


Trump Administration could undo legalization moves ... State banking bill could help canna businesses ... Marijuana prices still dropping ... Can cows get high? ... and more.

Dear Donald Trump: "I am not your convenient vagina"

Jan 19, 2017
George Baker

This Saturday, millions of people will take to the streets in cities across the country in concert with the Women’s March on Washington.

Violet Overn with Zach Romeo, resized and recropped

 

"F*ck U, in the Most Loving Way" is an exhibition presented by the Northern California Women's Caucus for Art that features 52 artists, from performance art to documentary film. It was curated by Tanya Augsburg, a feminist performance scholar and Associate Professor of Humanities and Liberal Studies at San Francisco State University. 

Hannah Kingsley-Ma

All week long, we've been playing this sound and asking you to guess what exactly it is and where exactly in the Bay Area we recorded it.

1/19: Women artists speak out

Jan 19, 2017


Cropped and used under CC license from Flickr user Steve Rhodes

 

Civil rights advocates draw cautionary parallels from this moment in history to the 1940s, when the U.S. government forcibly incarcerated more than a hundred thousand Japanese Americans.

"2569" by flikr user Jeremy Brooks used under CC license. Resized and cropped.

 

There’s been a 45 percent increase in mental health-related calls to BART police since 2011. When officers don’t know what to do, they call Armando Sandoval.

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