Morning Edition from NPR

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne
Joe Burke

NPR's signature morning show, with news updates from the BBC at the top of each hour.  Also, a local daily almanac at 5:49 and 8:49, what's for lunch in the San Francisco public schools at 6:49 (during the school year), and daily commentary from Jim Hightower at 7:49.   Enjoy the Crosscurrents Morning Report from KALW News Tuesday through Friday at 8:51, a Dispatch from Kolkata from Sandip Roy on Wednesdays at 7:35, and 99% Invisible at 7:35 on Fridays.

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KALW host: Joe Burke
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12:32am

Wed January 9, 2013
It's All Politics

Lobbying Battle Over Hagel Under Way Before Obama's Nod

Originally published on Sun January 13, 2013 6:03 am

Former U.S. Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., speaks at the White House on Monday after President Obama nominated him to replace Defense Secretary Leon Panetta.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Weeks before President Obama officially nominated Chuck Hagel to be secretary of defense, the lobbying battle was well under way. The fight might be bigger than any other Cabinet nomination in history as the former Republican senator's friends and foes prepare for modern combat on TV and the Internet.

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12:31am

Wed January 9, 2013
Law

Can Police Force Drunken Driving Suspects To Take Blood Tests?

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 10:32 am

A photographic screen hangs in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, which is undergoing renovations. On Wednesday, the justices will hear arguments in a case that asks whether police without a warrant can administer a blood test to a suspected drunken driver.
Greg E. Mathieson MAI/Landov

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a case testing whether police must get a warrant before forcing a drunken driving suspect to have his blood drawn.

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12:31am

Wed January 9, 2013
Education

Elite Colleges Struggle To Recruit Smart, Low-Income Kids

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 3:26 am

Top schools like Harvard, seen here in 2000, often offer scholarships and other financial incentives, but they are finding it hard to increase the socioeconomic diversity on campus.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Across the United States, college administrators are poring over student essays, recommendation letters and SAT scores as they select a freshman class for the fall.

If this is like most years, administrators at top schools such as Harvard and Stanford will try hard to find talented high school students from poor families in a push to increase the socioeconomic diversity on campus and to counter the growing concern that highly selective colleges cater mainly to students from privileged backgrounds.

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4:23am

Tue January 8, 2013
Asia

Chinese Dad Wants Gamer Son To Get A Job

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A Chinese man worried his son spent too much playing online video games. He was especially worried because the 23-year-old was out of work. So the father went online and hired virtual assassins to kill his son's avatar. He hoped his son would give up and get a job. A gamer's blog reports the son discovered the plot, asking his attackers why they whacked him every time he logged in. He told his father he's just waiting for the right job. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

4:00am

Tue January 8, 2013
Around the Nation

Lone Wolf From Oregon Roams California

The wolf is called OR7 because he was the seventh gray wolf in Oregon outfitted with a GPS tracking collar. Unlike most gray wolves, he strayed far from home, to California, where he's roamed thousands of miles.

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