Morning Edition from NPR

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne
Joe Burke

NPR's signature morning show, with news updates from the BBC at the top of each hour.  Also, a local daily almanac at 5:49 and 8:49, what's for lunch in the San Francisco public schools at 6:49 (during the school year), and daily commentary from Jim Hightower at 7:49.   Enjoy the Crosscurrents Morning Report from KALW News Tuesday through Friday at 8:51, a Dispatch from Kolkata from Sandip Roy on Wednesdays at 7:35, and 99% Invisible at 7:35 on Fridays.

Local Host(s): 
KALW host: Joe Burke
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Composer ID: 
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2:08am

Tue January 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

Breast Cancer: What We Learned In 2012

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 7:08 am

Betty Daniel gets a routine yearly mammogram from mammography tech Stella Palmer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in 2012.
Heather Charles MCT/Landov

The past year has seen more debate about the best way to find breast cancers.

A recent analysis concluded that regular mammograms haven't reduced the rate of advanced breast cancers — but they have led more than a million women to be diagnosed with tumors that didn't need to be treated.

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2:08am

Tue January 1, 2013
Business

What Does Senate Budget Deal Mean For You?

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 6:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy New Year.

Let's start with the upside. Congress has yet to rattle the financial markets so far in 2013.

GREENE: Of course, the markets are closed on this New Year's Day, as the House considers a deal on taxes and spending. The Senate has already approved that plan by a huge majority.

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2:08am

Tue January 1, 2013
Latin America

Mexico's President Alters Tactics Against Drug Crimes

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 6:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It has been a busy year in Mexico's war on drugs. The administration of former President Felipe Calderon struck major blows to the country's largest cartels, slowing the violence that has claimed more than 50,000 lives.

But the new president, Enrique Pena Nieto, says he'll change tactics. He wants to go after the crime associated with drug trafficking instead of taking down crime bosses. His new attorney general says this is the right strategy, since the number of crime gangs working in the country has grown significantly.

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12:17am

Tue January 1, 2013
Southword

Coming Home — And Out — In The South

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 2:17 pm

Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Campaign, based in Washington, D.C.
Dave Anderson Oxford American magazine

12:00am

Tue January 1, 2013
Law

Justice Wants Banks To Be Quasi Cops

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 6:44 am

Assistant U.S. Attorney General Lanny Breuer announces a nearly $2 billion money laundering settlement with British bank HSBC on Dec. 11 in New York City.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Every year, banks handle tens of millions of transactions. Some of them involve drug money, or deals with companies doing secret business with countries like Iran and Syria, in defiance of trade sanctions.

But if the Justice Department has its way, banks will be forced to change — to spot illegal transactions and blow the whistle before any money changes hands.

Federal prosecutors have already collected more than $4.5 billion from some of the world's biggest financial institutions — banks charged with looking the other way when dirty money passed through their accounts.

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