Morning Edition from NPR

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Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne
Joe Burke

NPR's signature morning show, with news updates from the BBC at the top of each hour.  Also, a local daily almanac at 5:49 and 8:49, what's for lunch in the San Francisco public schools at 6:49 (during the school year), and daily commentary from Jim Hightower at 7:49.   Enjoy the Crosscurrents Morning Report from KALW News Tuesday through Friday at 8:51, a Dispatch from Kolkata from Sandip Roy on Wednesdays at 7:35, and 99% Invisible at 7:35 on Fridays.

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KALW host: Joe Burke
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12:38am

Wed August 15, 2012
National Security

Taliban Showing New Willingness On Prisoner Swap

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 2:14 am

This image provided by IntelCenter on Dec. 8, 2010, shows a frame grab from a video released by the Taliban containing footage of a man believed to be Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The 26-year-old Army sergeant was captured by the Taliban more than three years ago.
AP

There are new glimmers of hope for the only known U.S. prisoner of war held captive in Afghanistan — 26-year-old Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was captured by the Taliban more than three years ago. After lengthy discussions, it appears his captors may be more receptive than ever before to finding a way to send him home.

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11:51pm

Tue August 14, 2012
Humans

Changing Climate May Have Led To Earliest Mummies

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 2:14 am

a recent National Geographic story shows a long-buried corpse, preserved by one of Earth's driest climates, Chile's Atacama Desert, where it has retained centuries-old skin, hair and clothing." href="/post/changing-climate-may-have-led-earliest-mummies" class="noexit lightbox">
A photo from a recent National Geographic story shows a long-buried corpse, preserved by one of Earth's driest climates, Chile's Atacama Desert, where it has retained centuries-old skin, hair and clothing.
Enrico Ferorelli National Geographic

A couple of thousand years before the Egyptians preserved some of their dead, a much simpler society made the first known mummies.

The Chinchorros, the first mummy makers, lived about 7,000 years ago in South America, on the coast near the border between modern-day Peru and Chile. The desert area where they lived was so dry, dead people turned into mummies naturally.

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11:48pm

Tue August 14, 2012
The Record

My American Dream Sounds Like The White Stripes

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 12:27 pm

The White Stripes.
Autumn De Wilde Courtesy of the artists

7:03pm

Tue August 14, 2012
Sweetness And Light

Feeling Just Wild About Wild Cards

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 10:46 am

Baltimore Orioles center fielder Adam Jones is out at second against Kansas City Royals shortstop Alcides Escobar. Despite less-than-stellar statistics, the Orioles are contenders in the American League wild-card race.
Nick Wass AP

Bud Selig, the commissioner of baseball, has persuaded his owners and the players to add an extra wild-card team to the playoffs, so now five teams per league will qualify.

Not only is this terrific for the fans, but Selig also wisely managed to make it so that the wild-card teams engage in a one-game showdown for the privilege of being the team that joins the three division winners in the battle for the league championship.

I have just the old-fashioned word for this newfangled development: nifty.

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4:06am

Tue August 14, 2012
Europe

Alpine Championship Attracks Finger Wrestlers

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 4:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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