Morning Edition from NPR

Weekdays 5-9am
Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne
Joe Burke

NPR's signature morning show, with news updates from the BBC at the top of each hour.  Also, a local daily almanac at 5:49 and 8:49, what's for lunch in the San Francisco public schools at 6:49 (during the school year), and daily commentary from Jim Hightower at 7:49.   Enjoy the Crosscurrents Morning Report from KALW News Tuesday through Friday at 8:51, a Dispatch from Kolkata from Sandip Roy on Wednesdays at 7:35, and 99% Invisible at 7:35 on Fridays.

Local Host(s): 
KALW host: Joe Burke
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Composer ID: 
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1:44am

Fri June 15, 2012
Asia

China's Economy Cools, Perhaps More Than Planned

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 8:14 am

A Chinese worker operates a machine at a factory in Binzhou in northeast China's Shandong province. China's exports and imports shot up in May year-on-year, the customs agency said on June 10, defying expectations amid a slowdown in the world's second largest economy.
AFP/Getty Images

In recent months, economic growth in China has not only slowed — it's slowed faster than most people expected. Last week, for the first time since the depths of the global financial crisis, the government actually cut lending rates to try to spur growth. All of this has people wondering: Where is the world's star economy headed?

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1:43am

Fri June 15, 2012
Planet Money

Can Lincoln Be Cool Again?

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 7:56 am

An ad for the 1965 Lincoln Continental.
courtesy Lincoln

In the car business, Lincoln once stood as the pinnacle of luxury. Frank Sinatra drove a Lincoln. So did the Shah of Iran. In the U.S., the presidential limo was a Lincoln.

The brand peaked with the 1961 Lincoln Continental, a beautiful, innovative car that stood for style, individuality and sophistication.

But after the '60s, Lincoln started on a long, slow decline that mirrored the slide of the American auto industry.

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1:07am

Fri June 15, 2012
Humans

Famous Cave Paintings Might Not Be From Humans

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 6:33 am

The Panel of Hands in the Cave of El Castillo in Spain. New dating methods suggest the paintings could have been drawn by Neanderthals, not humans, as previously thought.
Pedro Saura AAAS/Science

The famous paintings on the walls of caves in Europe mark the beginning of figurative art and a great leap forward for human culture.

But now a novel method of determining the age of some of those cave paintings questions their provenance. Not that they're fakes — only that it might not have been modern humans who made them.

The first European cave paintings are thought to have been made over 30,000 years ago. Most depict animals and hunters. Some of the eeriest are stencils of human hands, apparently made by blowing a spray of pigment over a hand held up to a wall.

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12:42am

Fri June 15, 2012
Interviews

A Single Dad And His Unlikely College Roommate

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:33 am

Wil Smith visited StoryCorps with his daughter, Olivia, in Sheffield, Mass.
StoryCorps

11:03pm

Thu June 14, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

Tracing The Trail Of Musical Fathers

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 7:56 am

Fathers have played an important role in shaping musical history.
Matthew Scherf iStockphoto.com

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