Sandip Roy's Dispatches from Kolkata

Wednesdays at 7:35am and 4:45pm

Sandip Roy, former host of Your Call and  New America Now, is back on KALW, bringing you a little bit of the story of the new India every week – a letter home from his other home.

A lot has been written about the changing India, says Roy. But reporting about a changing India is one thing. Living in it and dealing with a country where newspapers are still being launched instead of folding, Internet rumors spark mass exoduses, and cricketers advertise skin-whitening creams called Fair and Handsome is another thing.

Sandip Roy’s "Dispatch from Kolkata" can be heard Wednesdays at 7:35am and 4:45pm during KALW’s presentation of Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Sandip Roy

 

What do immigrants carry with them to America?

Spices. Pressure cookers. Pickles. What’s far more unpredictable is what they carry back.

Sandip Roy: Mango Crazy

Jul 8, 2015

What we call mango in English has a hundred different names in India. Indians don’t love their mangos. They form fanatical fan clubs of different kinds of mango.  

USA Today

After the historic ruling from SCOTUS on gay marriage, Sandip Roy reflects on... his Facebook feed?  

In India the Supreme Court did not realize that when it recriminalized gay sex,  society had come a long way. Like toothpaste it just cannot be pushed back into the tube.

The Mumbai LGBT Film Festival is a symbol of how far society has come.  

Satyajit Ray put India on the map of world cinema with his Apu Trilogy, and the negatives were thought to be destroyed in a fire.

It might take a village to raise a child. But it took three continents to raise one little village in Bengal from its ashes.

India has tied itself in knots thanks to a noodle problem. The country has been in an uproar since tests alleged that some packets of Maggi instant noodles have been found to contain lead and MSG. Its caused an instant uproar.

When I moved to Calcutta from San Francisco,  I’d often marvel, that for a city of 4 and half million, everyone seems to know everyone.  But writer Prajwal Parajuly is from a town so small that everyone really does know everyone.

Prajwel Parajuly will be reading from his book "Land Where I Flee" at bay Area Festival of Books on June 6, and Kepler's in Menlo Park on June 8th.

I was reporting on India’s 2014 general election which would bring Narendra Modi to power a year ago.

Sultan, though that’s not his real name, was officially hired as my driver, much younger than me. But it was quite clear very early on who was the top dog in our relationship.

  One hot muggy afternoon last week I was at the city office in Kolkata trying to figure out a property tax bill.  After two and a half hours of running from pillar to post, counter to counter, waiting on one official or the other, I understood first hand a fact of life in India – the system never works for you unless you know someone with connections who can, as they say, "manage it for you." But as I was sitting in that office I heard a piece of news that restored my faith...

In the last decade Bollywood has snuck into America. Bollywood aerobics. Bollywood theme parties. It even snuck into the Oscars via Slumdog Millionaire.

But nothing prepared me for the oddest couple of all - Bollywood and geopolitics.

 

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