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KALW's call-in show: Politics and culture, dialogue and debate. And every Friday, the Media Roundtable.  Join the conversation at 1-866-798-TALK, or e-mail yourcall@kalw.orgor tweet us @yourcallradio.  Subscribe to the Your Call podcast on iTunes.

Credit: Alaa Al-Marjani/Reuters


On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll talk about the fall of Kirkuk with the Guardian’s Martin Chulov. Three weeks after the Kurdish referendum for independence, the Iraqi military and Iranian backed Shiite militias took over the Kurdish held city of Kirkuk. What’s next?

  

Investigative journalist David Cay Johnston says Donald Trump’s tax plan will help Donald Trump.

  

Author Daniel Handler, also known as Lemony Snicket, says young adult fiction is willing to address just about anything, except the sexuality of adolescent boys.

New American Story Project / Photos by Ed Ntiri

  

In 2014, US and Mexican authorities apprehended more than 340,000 people fleeing Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala.

AFP

Two dozen fires have burned almost 200,000 acres of wild and urban spaces in Northern California, destroying more than 5,700 structures and killing at least 34 people.

  

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll speak with investigative journalist Raissa Robles about the media landscape in the Philippines and President Rodrigo Duterte’s deadly war on drugs, which has led to thousands of deaths.

KALW reporter Ninna Gaensler-Debs

  

We’ll discuss the fires ravaging the North Bay from Rohnert Park.

  

Every year, the Brower Youth Awards recognizes the work of six young leaders for their accomplishments in the environmental movement.

  

What advancements have been made in the fight against breast cancer?

  

On Indigenous People's Day, we’ll rebroadcast our conversation with historian Benjamin Madley about his groundbreaking book An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873.

 

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll speak with Juan Gonzalez, co-host of Democracy Now! about his new book Reclaiming Gotham: Bill de Blasio and the Movement to End America’s Tale of Two Cities.

  

What will it take to have an honest conversation about the gun lobby in the US? Why was it legal for Stephen Paddock allowed to buy 33 guns in 12 months?

  

The new documentary Company Town follows a group of citizens in Crossett, a small town in Arkansas, who are fighting for their lives against Georgia-Pacific, one of the nation’s largest paper mills and chemical plants, owned by the billionaire Koch brothers.

 

CRISPR, the powerful gene editing technique that enables the precise modification of genes, is revolutionizing medicine and biotechnology. It can be used to alter embryonic DNA, delay the aging process, treat cancer, and other diseases. 

  On this edition of our One Planet series, we’ll discuss the push for electric cars.  More than 500,000 electric cars have been sold in the US, half of them in California. 

FABRIZIO BENSCH / REUTERS

  On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss Germany’s election results. For the first time in Germany's postwar history, a far-right party managed to enter Parliament. The anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party won 12.6% of the vote.

Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz of San Juan, Puerto Rico recently told CBS, "People are starting to die. I've put them in the ambulances when they're gasping for air." 

We’ve done several shows about online sexism and trolls. What’s changed? Videogame developer and activist Zoe Quinn explores this question in her new book Crash Override: How Gamergate Nearly Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate.

  

Technology has transformed the way scientists and researchers track animals around the globe. In their new book, Where The Animals Go: Tracking Wildlife with Technology in 50 Maps and Graphics, designer Oliver Uberti and geographer James Cheshire explore the animal tracking revolution.

In 2015, a massive investigation by Inside Climate News and the LA Times detailed how Exxon conducted cutting-edge climate research decades ago and then, without revealing all that it had learned, worked at the forefront of climate denial.

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of the deadly earthquake in Mexico, which killed more than 225 people, including at least 25 children at a school in Mexico City.

  

San Francisco is about to become the first major US city to honor and recognize more than 200,000 women and girls from 13 Asia-Pacific countries who were forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese military during World War II.

  

Donald Trump has nominated more than five times as many judges to the federal courts as Barack Obama had at this point in his Presidency.

 In her new book Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America, historian Nancy MacLean tells the story of the Nobel Prize-winning political economist James McGill Buchanan who played a key role in the rise of the radical right.

June marked the 50th anniversary of the occupation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and East Jerusalem. After visiting the occupied territories, renowned novelists and essayists Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman marked the anniversary by inviting international writers to bear witness to the human cost of the occupation and share their experiences.

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll have a conversation with Brooke Gladstone, co-host of WNYC's On the Media, about her new book The Trouble with Reality: A Rumination on Moral Panic in Our Time.

Biometric scans, automated online spies, and facial recognition software were featured in the 1999 science fiction film The Minority Report. Today, they are becoming embedded into the fabric of our daily lives.

In the new documentary The Force, an Oakland police officer tells new recruits, “I don’t want bad cops. Period. I don’t need them.” In the film, director Peter Nicks follows the Oakland Police Department over two years.

  

In his new book Caesar’s Last Breath: Decoding the Secrets of the Air Around Us, science writer Sam Kean writes that with every breath you take, you inhale the history of the world.

In his new book, The Golden Shore: California's Love Affair with the Sea, marine conservationist David Helvarg takes us on a geographic and cultural journey of the 1,100-mile Pacific coastline.

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