Your Call

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KALW's call-in show: Politics and culture, dialogue and debate. And every Friday, the Media Roundtable.  Join the conversation at 1-866-798-TALK, or e-mail yourcall@kalw.orgor tweet us @yourcallradio.  Subscribe to the Your Call podcast on iTunes.

Courtesy davidcayjohnston.com

In his new book, It’s Even Worse Than you Think: What the Trump Administration is Doing to America, investigative journalist David Cay Johnston says political termites have infested our government. On this edition of Your Call, we discuss how the Trump administration is working to undermine government.

Photo by Rodney Dunning, used under Creative Commons license via Flickr

On this edition of Your Call:  Immigrants who have lived in the United States for the majority of their lives or have fled dangerous conflicts are being deported. In many cases, they no longer have connections to their home countries. ICE is now arresting people after they drop their kids off at school or at when they show up for their regular ICE check-in.

Charlotte Cooper, used under Creative Commons license, via Flickr

Reproductive rights, protections against sexual assault, transgender rights, and access to healthcare are all under attack. Patients are scrambling to find care, pregnant inmates are overcrowded in jails, and women's health is suffering under budget cuts. The news site Rewire extensively documents what is happening to reproductive rights and justice. How should journalists hold legislators accountable for their attacks on women's health? 

Subhankar Banerjee

  

  

What does the Arctic tell us about climate change? On this edition of Your Call’s One Planet Series, writer and environmental activist Subhankar Banerjee joins us to discuss the Trump administration’s plans to open nearly all US coastal waters and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling.

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage of Turkey’s military assault on the Kurdish enclave of Afrin in Syria. The attack has displaced more than 5,000 people and more than 25 have been killed.

Daniel Schwen via Wikimedia Commons

When people who commit minor crimes can't pay their fines, they often end up in jail. It's just one aspect of systemic inequality in the criminal justice system. Peter Edelman explores this racially biased system in his new book Not a Crime to Be Poor: The Criminalization of Poverty in America.

He argues that the phrases 'school-to-prison pipeline' and 'cradle-to-prison pipeline' are too narrow. The United States has developed a criminal justice system that ensures a cradle to coffin pipeline. What's being done to change a system that traps entire communities in inescapable cycles of poverty? We'll speak with Edelman and Brendon Woods, the first African American public defender in Alameda County.

 

Mimzy via Pixabay

  

You can’t see it, but your phone and your internet connection emits non-ionizing radiation. Scientists and doctors have been debating the health and environmental effects of radiation for years.

Jordan Uhl

  

In the 45 years since the Supreme Court decided the landmark Roe v. Wade case, which legalized abortion in the United States, mostly Republicans have enacted hundreds of policies that restrict access to abortion and other reproductive care.

How has access to abortion changed in the decades since that watershed case? We’ll speak with women who are fighting for abortion access and women who remember what life was like when abortion was illegal.

Guests:

  

On the next Your Call’s One Planet Series, we’ll speak with Penn State professor and climatologist Michael Mann who calls the Trump administration the most anti-science and anti-environmental administration in US history.

Jose Luis Gonzalez / Reuters

  

On the next media roundtable, we’ll discuss two separate investigations on the US-Mexico border by USA Today and ProPublica.

Homeboy Industries

  

Father Gregory Boyle was a pastor at a church in Los Angeles in the late 1980s, a time of devastating gang violence. Boyle responded to the violence in the community by working with gang members and formerly incarcerated people. He started an organization that eventually came to be known as Homeboy Industries, now the largest gang rehabilitation project in the world. In his new book, Barking to the Choir: The power of radical kinship, Boyle explores the spiritual lessons learned from the stories of the former gang members he has worked with.

Master Steve Rapport / IndivisibleSF

  

Activists resisting the Trump administration have been organizing protests, mobilizing voters, and running for office. They have opposed restrictions on immigration, advocated for women’s rights, and spoken out against racial injustice. More than 250 Women’s March anniversary actions are planned for January 20. We’ll ask local organizers: Where has the movement succeeded, and what’s to come in 2018?

Guests:

We're marking MLK Jr. Day by discussing environmental justice with Mustafa Ali, the former head of the EPA's environmental justice program. Over the past 24 years, he's worked with hundreds of communities of color, low income communities, and indigenous populations.

An estimated eight percent of the world’s household financial wealth is held in offshore tax haven. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll speak with Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Jake Bernstein about his new book Secrecy World: Inside the Panama Papers Investigation of Illicit Money Networks and the Global Elite.

  

Women in low-wage jobs – janitors, domestic workers, farmworkers, waitresses – face rampant sexual abuse and assault on the job. When wages are low, there's no HR to report abuse and work sites can be isolated.

Photo by jseubring via Pixabay

  

Media outlets across the country have been rocked by the #metoo movement. From NBC to NPR, news organizations have fired or are investigating male journalists for sexual harassment. We’ll continue our #metoo series by talking about what happens when women in news media report sexual harassment, and what needs to change. How will this shift the media’s power structure?

 

Guests:

Katherine Goldstein, independent journalist who covers women and work for Slate, Vox and others

Photo by Chantal Cousineau

  

From judges and politicians to public radio hosts and actors, the power of the #metoo movement has brought down a wide range of powerful men for harassment and abuse.

By 2050, the oceans will contain more plastic than fish. On the next Your Call’s One Planet series, we’ll speak with Dr. Marcus Eriksen about his new book, Junk Raft: An Ocean Voyage and a Rising Tide of Activism to Fight Plastic Pollution.

Since December 28, tens of thousands of protestors have taken to the streets in more than 50 cities across Iran. They're demonstrating against dire economic conditions, and corruption. At least 20 people been killed and more than 1,000 have been arrested. On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss coverage.

Image by Valery Kenski, used under CC/Flickr

Photo by Kevin Tong / Used Under CC / flickr

  

How are students who are the first in their family to go to college faring?

On the first Your Call of 2018, we'll be joined by a panel of young environmental activists from around the Bay Area to discuss the state of the environmental movement.  How are they connecting global crises with local action? What did they accomplish in 2017 and what's at the top of their agenda for the new year?

  

How did one factory challenge the apparel industry’s sweatshops? The Alta Gracia factory in the Dominican Republic is the only factory in the global south to pay workers a living wage.

  

The new documentary Company Town follows a group of citizens in Crossett, a small town in Arkansas, who are fighting for their lives against Georgia-Pacific, one of the nation’s largest paper mills and chemical plants, owned by the billionaire Koch brothers.


  In The Know-It-Alls, former New York Times technology columnist Noam Cohen chronicles the political rise of Silicon Valley.Millionaires and billionaires likes Jeff Bezos, Peter Thiel, Sergey Brin, Larry Page, and Mark Zuckerberg have shaped the internet, while mainstreaming radical individualism.

What’s being done to protect wild orangutans and other endangered wildlife? On the next Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with conservation scientist Dr. Ian Singleton about the discovery of a new orangutan species in the Indonesian forest.

  

On this week’s media roundtable, we’ll discuss press freedom in the United States and across the world, and the shifting media landscape in the Trump era. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, in 2017, the number of journalists jailed around the world reached a record high of 262.

Your Call: Hacking the American Mind

Dec 21, 2017

  

UCSF endocrinologist Robert Lustig is best known for his research into the addictive properties of sugar. In his new book, The Hacking of the American Mind, Lustig widens his scope to look at how the food industry has fostered today’s epidemics of addiction and depression.

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