affordable housing

Photo by Mark Hogan cropped and reused under CC

After failing to make a deal last year, state legislators and Governor Jerry Brown vowed to take action to address California's housing crisis. They just might get it done this week.

  

As rents and evictions continue to soar throughout Northern California, several cities are taking action. On Election Day, a number of Bay Area cities passed or strengthened rent control laws.

President Trump appointed Ben Carson, the retired neurosurgeon, to run the Department of Housing and Urban Development. This week the Senate advanced his nomination, bringing him one step closer to becoming secretary.

Liza Veale

 

Cheap rental housing can feel like a vanishing resource in San Francisco. Property owners are selling buildings for multiples of what they originally bought them for, and who can blame them? But the consequence is that almost all the units are getting fixed up and turned into luxury housing. It’s the way of the market, and it can seem inevitable. But what if it’s not?

Liza Veale

 

Eva Castillo* thinks of herself as a strong person. She was raised in the Sunnydale projects in San Francisco, sharing a bedroom with three brothers. Now, she works construction — often as the only woman on the job. But when she was evicted, she says she felt truly helpless for the first time in her life.

Liza Veale

In order to stem the tide of displacement in places like the Bay Area, some advocates want to strengthen tenant protections at the state level. One way to do that would be to modify or repeal the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act.

Liza Veale

 

Though we’re all understandably consumed by the news at the national level, the last election also came with consequences for the Bay Area locally—especially for the region’s ongoing housing crisis.


  How do we create live/work spaces that are safe and affordable for artists?

Ignacio Munguía / Used under CC / flickr

 

What has changed for San Francisco’s homeless population under the city’s new homeless director Jeff Kositsky?

The emergent "Yes In My Backyard" (or YIMBY) movement and its well-established opposition both come out of the progressive left.  

Your Call: Ghost Ship fire aftermath

Dec 8, 2016

 

How should we address the issues that led to the tragic Ghost Ship fire, which took the lives of at least 36 people?

Photo courtesy of the Chinatown Community Development Corporation

 

As of this month, San Francisco’s public housing is now all privately run. 3,500 units have been transferred from the city’s ownership to various housing groups: some non-profit, and some for-profit.

Prop 13: Mad as Hell

Nov 14, 2016
Photo courtesy of Retro Report

In 1978, when Howard Jarvis declared that he was mad as hell about rising property taxes in California, he started a tax revolt in the state. Thirty-eight years later, Jarvis’s Proposition 13 is still on the books in California, but the debate over its consequences remains.

Prop P is one of several super technical housing policy measures on the San Francisco ballot. It would change the way the city picks developers to build affordable housing on public land.

Snitow-Kaufman Productions

  

On the October 27th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about Company Town, a new documentary that tells the story of a local election campaign and political decisions that will determine the future of San Francisco.

 

San Francisco schools have a problem. With just over a week left before kids return to the classroom, the district doesn't have enough teachers to teach them.

Daily News Roundup for July 13, 2016

Jul 13, 2016
By wiki user Phyrexian, used under CC license / cropped and resized.

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW news: 

San Francisco To Vote Nation’s Most Strict Styrofoam Ban // ABC 7 News

“San Francisco lawmakers are poised to give final approval to what will be the strictest ban in the nation on Styrofoam products.

Daily news roundup for Monday, July 11, 2016

Jul 11, 2016
"Caltrain" by Flickr user clogsilk, used under CC/ Resized

Here’s what’s happening in the Bay Area as curated by KALW News:

Daily news roundup for Thursday, June 30, 2016

Jun 30, 2016
"San Francisco China Town” by Flickr user Loïc Lagarde, used under CC / Resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Crime: In rare occurrence, big three Bay Area cities see similar midyear homicide counts // San Jose Mercury News

"Halfway through the year, the homicide numbers of the Bay Area's three largest cities have reached a rare occurrence: They're nearly the same.

On the June 30th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our week-long series on San Francisco’s homeless crisis by opening the lines to take your questions for Jeff Kositsky.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, May 24, 2016

May 24, 2016
By Flickr user Alejandro Lavin, Jr. / used under CC license / resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

Acting SF police chief meets with Bayview community leaders // SF Gate

“Acting San Francisco police Chief Toney Chaplin faced tough questioning by Bayview community leaders Monday evening where residents asked for answers in last week’s officer-involved shooting that led to former Chief Greg Suhr’s resignation.

Matthew Desmond

On the May 13th edition of Your Call, Sociologist Matthew Desmond discusses his new book “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.” 

Ben Trefny

After decades of dreaming, planning, and delays, Treasure Island is set to be transformed.

So here’s a question for you: Would you want to rent or buy on Treasure Island? KALW will be reporting on this question over the coming months,  and we need your help to sharpen the focus and deepen the conversation.

KALW would like to hear your input to help us with our reporting. Please click here. The deadline is June 5, 2016.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Apr 26, 2016
Flickr user Daniel ............ / used under CC license / resized and cropped

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

 

San Francisco Torn as Some See ‘Street Behavior’ Worsen // New York Times

 

 

In the Bay Area, one strategy for dealing with the housing shortage is to try to build ourselves out. But brand new housing can be too expensive for middle- and working-class people to move into. In San Francisco, it now costs $700,000-800,000 to build a new unit. That’s forced many developers in the area to ask if there is a way to build more quickly and for less money. There is. It’s the same way we build anything more efficiently—by using factories.

Chris Hambrick

Here in the Bay Area, rents are rising, and housing inventory is shrinking. It’s forcing many here to decide -- either you have to leave the area completely, or you have to get creative about your housing situation.

Daily news roundup for Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Feb 17, 2016

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW News:
 

Apple opposes order to help FBI unlock phone belonging to San Bernardino shooter // L.A. Times

“Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook says his company will resist a federal judge's order to access encrypted data hidden on a cellphone that belonged to the terrorist couple who killed 14 people in San Bernardino last year.

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Feb 2, 2016
By flckr user Florent Lamoureux / Used under CC BY-NC/Resized

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

At Berkeley, a New Digital Privacy Protest // The New York Times

“After hackers breached the computer network of the U.C.L.A. medical center last summer, Janet Napolitano, president of the University of California, and her office moved to shore up security across the university system’s 10 campuses.

Audrey Dilling

 

About a hundred people are seated in the basement auditorium at the San Francisco Main Library, waiting for an affordable housing lottery to begin.

Under CC re-use with permission from Flickr User Brooke Andersson (cropped and re-sized).

As the market pushes residents out of San Francisco, how does the city step in to provide homes that people can afford? Who do these homes go to? Reporter Audrey Dilling sat down with KALW's Hana Baba to explain the laws we have today, and how Mayor Ed Lee proposes to  make housing more affordable. 

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