affordable housing

According to a 2013 study, one in six people who work in Silicon Valley spend at least two hours on their commute. Nuemi Guzman is one of those people. She’s a legal assistant with the Law Foundation of Silicon Valley.

 

Leslye Corsiglia has been working to create affordable housing in San Jose for more than 30 years. She's just recently left the city's Department of Housing to take a a position at the helm of a new advocacy organization called Silicon Valley at Home. She sat down with KALW’s Audrey Dilling to talk about the region’s challenges and opportunities for affordable housing.

 

Click the audio player to hear the full interview.

 

  

Angela Johnston

When you walk inside the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park, you can tell right away that this is home for over 400 people. They’ve painted their units bright colors. There are traditional mobile homes that look like small rectangular bungalows – but there are also little cottages, Airstream trailers, and RVs. Kids zigzag between the park’s six streets on their bikes.

“I was 11 when we moved here with my parents. I practically grew up here,” says Erika Escalante.

Daily News Roundup for Monday, July 13, 2015

Jul 13, 2015
Illustration by Mitch Green

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

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S.F. loses affordable housing almost as quickly as it builds it // San Francisco Business Times

What Facebook's expansion means for East Palo Alto

Jul 7, 2015
Chris Hambrick

 

When Menlo Park city leaders wanted to add services for residents in their Belle Haven neighborhood, Facebook pitched in to fund a community center.  It’s located in a shopping strip behind the new Facebook west Campus, next to a Japanese restaurant.  

Your Call: What does gentrification mean to you?

Jun 22, 2015

On the June 22nd edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation with D.W. Gibson, journalist and author of The Edge Becomes the Center: An Oral History of Gentrification in the 21st Century. By interviewing a wide cross section of New Yorkers, from a drug dealer to a banking executive, Gibson gets inside the varied ways people experience and perceive the transformation of neighborhoods by the influx of new wealth and new residents. What does gentrification look like where you live?

Guest: 

Daily news roundup for Tuesday, May 12th

May 12, 2015
BAR Architects

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

S.F. Mayor Lee, supervisor Avalos to unveil dueling housing bonds // SF Gate

March 29 was the last night Delilah Soto slept on the street. She’s a recovering heroin addict who’s been living in a tent in San Francisco’s Mission District with her girlfriend, Rocky Anderson, and their dog Sparta. That night, she learned they had another choice.

Nearby, 1950 Mission St. was dead space. A closed-down school site sitting on premium San Francisco real estate, begging to be repurposed. On March 30, the gates opened on a new pilot program called the “Navigation Center”.

flickr user Jeremy Brooks

 

In one of America's most expensive cities, there's a fringe political party whose name sums up their concerns: The Rent is Too Damn High. That city is New York – but in San Francisco rents are even higher. And while no party around here has been quite so blunt about it, organizations are taking action.

The Bay Area Council Economic Institute hosted a housing forum earlier this year, and the conversation showed there are many ways to look at the problem – and many ways to disagree on how to solve it.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 9, 2015

Apr 9, 2015
KTVU

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

San Francisco man shares story of escaping war-torn Yemen // KTVU

Sara Brooke Curtis

Every place has a history hidden that lives beneath what you can see on the surface. Just take the Mission District. The Bart Station at 24th street and Mission is called Plaza Sandino by some -- because in the 1980’s Pro-Sandanista protesters would rally there. Right down the street, Potrero del Sol Park is better known to those who grew up here as La Raza park -- back in the 70’s it was a major gathering spot for low rider cars. This neighborhood has also been called the birthplace of Latin Rock.

Ellis Act evictions: Gum Gee Lee

Nov 10, 2014
Melanie Young

The Lees are an elderly immigrant couple who live with their disabled adult daughter. The new owner of their building evicted them to convert their apartment into tenancies-in-common.

“People call me Mrs. Lee. The owner provided a notice to me. Using the Ellis Act to evict me.

“Initially, it was really hard for me. Because on one hand, aside from them moving out, it was really difficult because I heard a lot of noise and banging from construction because the landlord is doing a lot of renovations.

Allen Temple Arms, East Oakland

 

Mary Butler is a person who "likes to keep very busy and independent."

She worked as a respiratory nurse for most of her adult life. After retiring in the early 2000s, she supported herself the way retirees are meant to: with a small pension and social security. She moved to Las Vegas for a while to take care of an ill sibling. When she moved back to Oakland, she couldn’t find a place to rent. Her retirement funds didn’t stack up.

Under CC license from Flickr user Ken Lund.

 

Thuylynh Nguyen’s family came to the U.S. from Vietnam in order to escape political persecution. Her father had spent eight years as a prisoner of war after serving as a soldier in the South Vietnamese army. The U.S. granted her family asylum in 1991.

 

We don’t build housing projects like we used to anymore. It used to be big, labyrinthine complexes like Marcy Houses in New York, Cabrini Green in Chicago, and Geneva Towers in San Francisco. Today, conversations about development have to do with mixed-use, mixed-income communities. 

http://www.pyatok.com

 

'When we say “affordable housing” we're actually using a precisely defined concept. "Affordable", in this context, means housing that costs no more than 30 percent of a household’s income.

Luisa Beck

A note to our readers: the names of formerly incarcerated men and their families in this story have been changed to protect their identities.

 

“My whole life, I never had a job.”

At the age of 51, William Bennett was one of the oldest people in California who could claim that. But in June 2013, eight months after leaving prison, that was about to change.

“Either Monday or Tuesday I’ll be working on the freeways,” he said. “580 or 880. Picking up trash. First job ever.”

  

A starting place for former foster youth

Mar 17, 2014
Rachel Wong


Dejon Lewis was 11 years old when child protective services arrived to take him and his twin sister away from their mother, whom he says is a drug addict. But instead of giving themselves over to the state, the two children made a run for it. Lewis says they stayed with a family friend for a while, but eventually they turned themselves in, and that’s when he entered the foster care system. Since then, Lewis has bounced around a lot.

“It’s hard to live when you’re just living with strangers and strangers and strangers, and no relatives. But I know down the road that that wouldn’t last forever, so I had to figure out how to be more independent,” he says.

Tenancies-in-common: Ashley Lyon

Dec 18, 2013
Melanie Young

  “My name is Ashley Lyon, and I’m a TIC owner. I live in a TIC with my wife and our dog. And we originally purchased our TIC back in 2003. We were both renters at the time and decided that we wanted to set our roots in San Francisco and started looking to see what might available to buy. Prices then were as crazy as they are now. Clearly they’re even crazier now.

 

Ellis Act evictions: Theresa Flandrich

Dec 18, 2013
Melanie Young

  Theresa Flandrich has lived and worked in North Beach for decades. She worked as a nurse at the Telegraph Hill Neighborhood Center and raised her son in a two bedroom apartment on Lombard Street. In April, 2013, she was evicted under the Ellis Act.

“My name is Theresa Flandrich. I live in North Beach on Lombard Street. I’ve lived here for 30 years. In April of this year I received an Ellis act notice that I will be evicted.

Tenancies-in-common: Jennifer Grant

Dec 18, 2013

  “My name is Jennifer Grant. I’m an office manager at a small nonprofit in San Francisco. I work at our family coalition. We work with LGBTQ-headed families with children.

 

“I live in a TIC in the North Panhandle. And I’ve lived there with my family for eight years.

 

“We wanted to have a home that was big enough for four of us. And we wanted to be in a neighborhood we thought would be family friendly.  And TIC is all we could afford.

 

Tenancies-in-common: Darren Bridgett

Dec 18, 2013
Melanie Young

  “My name is Darren Bridgett, and I live in a TIC with my wife and son in Cole Valley, and we’ve been here for I think five years now. Maybe close to six.

 

“I’m an actor and in the arts, and my wife is a psychotherapist. She’s co-director of Haight Ashbury Psychological Services. It provides psychological services for essentially like low-fee clients, kind of like the working poor.

 

Ellis Act evictions: Diego Deleo

Dec 18, 2013
Melanie Young

  Seventy-eight year old Diego Deleo likes to sit in San Francisco’s Washington Square, sharing poems with neighborhood friends. But Diego’s landlord recently evicted him, so he’ll have to move on.

 

“My name is Diego Deleo. I live in North Beach, and I have been Ellis Acted about two months ago so I have another 10 months to stay, and then I move out. I have to.

 

Audrey DIlling

Palo Alto is one of the country’s wealthiest cities. Yet, a recent study by the Council on Aging Silicon Valley found that more than 20 percent of residents over 60 years old live near or below the poverty line. This reality makes competition stiff for the limited affordable housing options available.

  

San Francisco’s latest survey of its homeless children and adults found that 29% of them were gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, while only about 15% of the city’s overall population is LGBT. So Monday, the city holds its first-ever LGBTQ Connect, a targeted version of its Project Homeless Connect events that help low-income people find housing and a wide range of services. Tonight on Out in the Bay, Eric Jansen’s guests are Project Homeless Connect program director Emily Cohen and AIDS Housing Alliance SF director Brian Basinger, instrumental in creating LGBTQ Connect. Tune in 7pm Thursday to learn about the services to be offered Monday at LGBTQ Connect and for a discussion about what "homeless" means in today's economy, why LGBT people have a hard time in homeless shelters and a hard time getting services, how evictions are disproportionately affecting LGBT people, and how San Francisco and other cities are addressing these challenges. 

Re-imagining Public Housing in SF

May 1, 2013

City Visions host Joseph Pace and guests discuss what the future may hold for public housing in San Francisco. How can the city improve living conditions, ensure a reliable source of funding, and ensure an adequate stock of safe and affordable housing for residents?

 On today's Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about efforts to build more affordable housing in the Bay Area and Northern California. According to the National Low Income Coalition, San Francisco is the most expensive place in the country for renters. Rents are also rising in the East Bay, Santa Clara, and San Mateo counties. Why are rents going up? How is this changing these areas? How affordable is your rent? It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.

Guests:

Gloria Bruce, deputy director of East Bay Housing Organizations

 

Tonight on City Visions we’ll talk about the unintended effects of urban renewal in the Bay Area. San Francisco has been undertaking a huge effort to revitalize its most blighted neighborhoods. What are the effects of gentrification on lower-income residents? Is there a way to improve the neighborhood without sacrificing the neighbor? 

Guests:

Peter Cohen, Co-Director of the Counsel of Community Housing Organization 

Oscar Grande, Community Organizer with People Organized to Demand Environment/Economic Rights

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