Kyle Spradley | © 2014 - Curators of the University of Missouri / flickr


On the August 27th edition of Your Call, we’re talking about growing interest in agriculture investments.

The food that grows from concrete

Jul 6, 2015
Olivia Cueva

Imagine eating at your favorite restaurant and being told that the salad on your plate was harvested from the cracks in the sidewalk in West Oakland. Would you eat it? Two professors from UC Berkeley think you should. Their project is called Berkeley Open Source Food. To get these weeds from the ground to your dinner plate, they’re commissioning high end restaurants like Berkeley’s Chez Panisse to use these greens and show the public that they are not only safe to eat, but have lots of nutritional value.

Your Call: Where are the bees and the butterflies?

May 11, 2015

On the May 11th edition of Your Call, we’ll have a conversation about efforts to restore pollinator habitats. Thousands of species of bees and butterflies are under threat. With 90 percent of the world’s flowering species requiring insects or other animals for pollination, how is the decline of bees and butterflies affecting our food supply and our landscapes? It’s Your Call with me, Rose Aguilar, and you.


On the May 5th edition of Your Call, we’ll continue our weeklong series on California’s water crisis by discussing the agriculture and its heavy reliance on water.

Under CC license from Flickr user Janet Ciucci

California is entering its fourth year of drought – and it’s really starting to show in some of the state’s most vital water resources. The Central Valley Project, which supplies water for about a third of California’s farmland, recently announced it had no water to give. That means those farmers will have to seek water elsewhere or let fields go fallow. About six percent of available farmland went unplanted last year due to the drought, resulting in more than $1 billion in lost revenue. The dire situation has left farmers and regular folks alike wondering when’s it going to end.

KALW’s Audrey Dilling has been looking into how much water it would take to get us out of this drought. She joined KALW’s Hana Baba in studio to talk about what she learned.

Your Call: How should we cope with extreme drought?

Aug 7, 2014
(Holly Bailey/Yahoo News)




On the August 7th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll have a conversation about the most severe drought in California's history. Nearly 60 percent of the state is in exceptional drought. Groundwater reserves are being depleted at record rates as wildfires break out north and south. What can the media and governments do to increase understanding of the severity of this drought? What is the state doing to conserve water, and how much is left? Join us on the next Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

Your Call: How do we maintain land for farming?

Apr 23, 2014


Flickr user Public Citizen


Trade representatives from twelve countries have been discussing the Trans-Pacific Partnership for four years. They’re discussing removing tariffs, protecting the environment, and stopping the piracy of copyrighted  material - all in the name of freer international trade.

Not much is known about what’s in this agreement, but based on what’s been leaked, here’s what we think we know about a couple of key components that will affect Californians: cows and computers.

On the farm


Julie Caine

At its heart, California’s food economy is all about agriculture. Our state produces almost half of the fruits and vegetables consumed in the United States. In the Bay Area, one of our biggest crops is grapes. And right now, it’s harvest time-- it started on August 1st and could run through late fall. 

Note: Will Durst is a comedian and you may find some of his material offensive, or worse, not funny. His views do not necessarily reflect those of KALW.  

Food fight in Florida over the Tomato Wars

Oct 24, 2012
Michel Marizco

Florida and Mexico growers are feuding over tomato prices. It’s the same argument heard nearly 20 years ago when NAFTA was first signed, when American farmers feared cheaper Mexican crops would flood the market here and put them out of business.

On today’s Your Call, we’ll have a conversation with Frank Bardacke, author of Trampling Out the Vintage: Cesar Chavez and the Two Souls of the United Farm Workers. We’ll mark Cesar Chavez’s upcoming birthday by talking about the history of the UFW and how it’s changed over the years? What can we learn from recent victories? Join us at 10 or email What issues are farm workers organizing around today?  It’s Your Call, with Rose Aguilar and you.