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LEGALIZATION & LEGISLATION

Liberace's Spectacular Crystal Closet

Apr 30, 2015
The Liberace Foundation for the Performing & Creative Arts

Recovering from our 10-year party and retrospective show taping last night, tonight at 7 we re-air a favorite we couldn't include any clips from last night. It's a music-rich documentary on the late "Mr. Showmanship"'s life and legacy, produced by Out in the Bay's Eric Jansen and told with love by Liberace Museum curators and a Liberace tribute artist, and featuring Liberace’s own voice and music.

Karen Ripley's "Oh, No! There's Men On The Land!"

Apr 23, 2015

The hilarious gay comedy pioneer Karen Ripley tells the stories of lesbian life in the '70s in her solo show, "Oh, No! There's Men On The Land!" opening May 1st at The Marsh in Berkeley. A gay stand-up before there WAS gay stand-up. Hear about the legendary Brick Hut cafe in Berkeley and all its 'dyke drama,' find out about the hot sex everybody was having with everybody, and discover the many characters in this coming-of-age story. 

http://themarsh.org

The Best of Out In The Bay: Life Before The Lifeboat

Mar 12, 2015

  

AIDS led the world to many new discoveries in medicine. But San Francisco's General Hospital pioneered a new model of patient care. In the film, "Life Before The Lifeboat,"  Dr. Paul Volberding interviews nurses, doctors, medical professionals, and community leaders from that time. Marilyn's audio version of the film is a compelling, dramatic, intense listening experience. A special rebroadcast Thursday, March 12th, 2015, at 7pm. 

Daily news roundup for Thursday, January 22, 2015

Jan 22, 2015
A private collector and www.outsidelands.org

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, curated by KALW news:

Managing Grief

Jan 1, 2015

How do we cope with the death of a spouse or lover? Or of a parent or sibling with whom we had a troubled relationship?  What particular challenges do LGBT people face in grieving? Surveys show that most Americans consider the loss of someone’s unmarried partner less traumatic for the survivor than the loss of a wife or husband. Where does that leave gay men and lesbians whose partners die? Bereavement experts say many minorities suffer "disenfranchised grief" - grief not fully recognized by society. On this week's Out in the Bay (7pm Thursday), Eric Jansen and guests discuss these and other aspects of grief and loss.  (First aired March 27, 2014; re-broadcast 7pm PST January 1, 2015)

Daniel Moore

For decades, San Francisco has been offering free condoms, STD testing, and counseling to its residents to help end the HIV epidemic. These interventions have had a big impact over the years, but the city still saw about 350 new HIV infections last year.  And nationally, “there are about 50,000 new HIV infections that happen ever year,” according to Susan Philip of the San Francisco Department of Public Health. “That is an unacceptable number. So we know that we need more tools in the arsenal.”

A Gay History: "For My Brothers"

Aug 20, 2014

The wild and crazy times of gay male life in San Francisco during the 70's and 80's are told in this memoir from someone who lived through them, miraculously. Marilyn talks with author Mark Abramson about his book, "For My Brothers." Thursday, August 21st, 2014. 7:00pm Pacific. 

A mile-high look at modern US history. Is it true most male flight attendants are gay? Was it ever? How did their legal battles with airlines help advance gay rights and workplace gender equity? Is the tale of “Patient Zero” – a steward accused of being the initial transcontinental spreader of HIV – accurate? Stow your tray tables and put your seats in their fully upright and locked positions for a quick flight through the history of airline stewards. Eric Jansen's guest is Philadelphia University history professor Phil Tiemeyer, author of Plane Queer: Labor, Sexuality and AIDS in the history of male flight attendants, published by University of California Press.

Living with AIDS behind prison walls

May 5, 2014

 



  

San Francisco’s latest survey of its homeless children and adults found that 29% of them were gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender, while only about 15% of the city’s overall population is LGBT. So Monday, the city holds its first-ever LGBTQ Connect, a targeted version of its Project Homeless Connect events that help low-income people find housing and a wide range of services. Tonight on Out in the Bay, Eric Jansen’s guests are Project Homeless Connect program director Emily Cohen and AIDS Housing Alliance SF director Brian Basinger, instrumental in creating LGBTQ Connect. Tune in 7pm Thursday to learn about the services to be offered Monday at LGBTQ Connect and for a discussion about what "homeless" means in today's economy, why LGBT people have a hard time in homeless shelters and a hard time getting services, how evictions are disproportionately affecting LGBT people, and how San Francisco and other cities are addressing these challenges. 

"The End of San Francisco" -- according to Mattilda

Aug 27, 2013

  

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, the provocative, angry, queer anti-assimilationist writer, is back on Out in the Bay, 7pm Thursday, with her latest ... manifesto? Or memoir?  (Even though she’s only 40) In The End of San Francisco, Mattilda deals with family, incest, gay sex work, the digital ruination of our City by the Bay, political correctness and its stifling effect on activism and even just talking with one another, and much more. Join Mattilda and host Eric Jansen for another, in Mattilda’s words, “delicious conversation” about life, struggles, triumphs -- ours and the cities we live in. 

Under CC license from Flickr user transitpeople

Living with HIV or AIDS can be hard. Even with advances in treatment, symptoms can be hard to manage, and medication is expensive. If you live in San Francisco, it’s even harder -- because the cost of living is so high. The median price  for a one-bedroom apartment in the city is almost $2,800 -- already out of reach for many low-income people, and even harder for people whose medical costs get higher as their diseases advance. The cost of medication an HIVs patient has to take can reach nearly $30,000 per year.  But for sixteen years, San Francisco’s had a place to help low-income AIDs patients. Leland House in Visitacion Valley. KALW student reporter Megan Quintana has always known about Leland House because her mom is a nursing assistant there.


Meth, AIDs, and The Gays

Mar 5, 2013

In the early part of the last decade, methamphetamine use in the Castro in San Francisco was called "the second epidemic" because gay men were having unprotected sex while high. But new research from The Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes or JAIDS, shows meth use by San Francisco gay men has declined considerably.  Why?  Was it the public service campaign? Or a generational shift?  And is it really declining or are people reluctant to tell the truth due to a stigma now? Marilyn Pittman talks with Matthew Bajko of the Bay Area Reporter. Airs 7pm Pacific Thursday March 7th. 

New Novels from Trebor Healey

Dec 20, 2012

"Funny, poignant, and erotic," says one reviewer about "Faun," the new novel by Trebor Healey.   "A Horse Named Sorrow," his second new novel, has been called "sexy, cinematic." Marilyn Pittman talks with him about the new work, what drives his passion for writing sexy, emotional stories, and his San Francisco roots. 7pm Thursday 12/20.  (First broadcast Oct. 18. Happy Holidaze!)

Martha Wash (of “It’s Raining Men” fame) shared a sneak preview from her new album, due out in January, with Out in the Bay's Eric Jansen and Mike Smith of the AIDS Emergency Fund. First Bay Area radio airplay, not yet on any other station!

Rick Nahmias

Golden States of Grace: Documentary photographer Rick Nahmias spent more than three years researching, photographing, and taking oral histories of 11 California faith communities outside the religious mainstream - including transgender sex workers in San Francisco's Tenderloin who worship Santa Muerte, Zen Buddhist San Quentin inmates, and an AIDS ashram in West Hollywood.

photo: Courtesy of The NAMES Project

The AIDS quilt has come home for a visit.

Considered by organizers to be the largest participatory art project in the world, the AIDS Memorial Quilt began spontaneously on San Francisco’s Market Street a generation ago, when gay rights activist Cleve Jones asked people to create quilt panels memorializing loved ones who had died of AIDS-related causes.

That was in 1987; today, over 91,000 individuals have been memorialized on more than 5,800 quilt panels, each the symbolic size of a coffin (3 X 6 ft.).