architecture

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...


99% Invisible: 99% 180

May 8, 2015

On the May 7, 2015 edition of 99% Invisible:

In the beginning, former AIA-SF president Henrik Bull and the Transamerica Pyramid did not get along.

Joel Werner

On the May 1, 2015 edition of 99% Invisible:

When it was built in 1977, Citicorp Center (later renamed Citigroup Center, now called 601 Lexington) was, at 59 stories, the seventh-tallest building in the world.

Liz Pfeffer

These days, our technology is getting smarter. We don’t just talk on the phone anymore, we talk to them. Siri is already a household name and our homes are getting smarter, too. There are thermostats that you can control from your cell phone. And smoke detectors that will text you if there’s a fire. San Franciscan Tom Coates has taken this technology one step further. He’s designed his home to track its vitals and tweet them out to the world, all triggered by a network of wi-fi enabled sensors.

Tom Levy

Architecture has the power to transform. A building can make us feel joy, or sadness, powerful or weak. Nowhere is this more true than in a church, a chapel, synagogue, Buddhist temple, or a mosque. For centuries, religion has sparked the design of some of the world’s most beautiful buildings. But what is that process? What built elements make a space sacred?

Architect Susie Coliver says experiencing the design of a sacred space begins way before you step foot in a building.

Pages