art

Sights & Sounds: Melonie Green

Nov 24, 2016
Courtesy of AfroSolo / cropped and resized

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene. Artist, curator and public programmer Melonie Green told KALW’s Jen Chien about three fantastic arts events happening around the Bay this weekend.

Sights & Sounds: Marc Bamuthi Joseph

Nov 17, 2016

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene. Writer, performer, educator, and Chief of Programming at the YBCA Marc Bamuthi Joseph told KALW’s Jen Chien about three fantastic arts events happening around the Bay this weekend.

Sights & Sounds: Seth Eisen

Oct 27, 2016
Garuy Ivanek / cropped and resized

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene. Transdisciplinary artist and performance maker Seth Eisen told KALW’s Jen Chien about three wonderful arts events happening around the Bay this weekend.

Sights & Sounds: Gina Gold

Sep 22, 2016

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene. Gina Gold, filmmaker and actor and host of TMI Storytelling, told KALW’s Jen Chien about three cool arts events happening around the Bay this weekend.

Sights & Sounds: Walter Hood

Sep 8, 2016
Molly DeCoudreaux Photography / resized and cropped

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene. Walter Hood, an artist and designer who renovated the Bayview Opera House, told KALW’s Jen Chien about three cool arts events happening around the Bay this weekend.

Philosophy Talk: This Is Your Brain on Art

Aug 23, 2016
"Your Brain on Rainbows" by garlandcannon used under CC license

If you could see inside my brain when I was looking at a piece of art, would you know what it was like for me to look at that art?

    

This week on KALW's showcase for the best stories from public radio podcasts and independent radio producers...

Philosophy Talk: The Mystery of Music

Jul 23, 2016
"Music" by crayon27 used under CC license

What does it mean to have good (or bad) taste in music?

Courtesy of the artist/ Resized and cropped

Sights & Sounds is your weekly guide to the Bay Area arts scene through the eyes and ears of local artists. Our guest is Dawline-Jane Oni-Eseleh, an artist and illustrator with work in two exhibits: Home at Pro Arts Gallery  in Oakland and  No Heroes Allowed at Art Attack SF in San Francisco. 

Andy Mogg

Wondering what's worth doing around the Bay Area this weekend? Well, we have you covered with our Weekend Go-Tos.

Todd Whitney

 

If you have walked the streets of the Bay Area recently -- you might have seen posters featuring the names and faces of Oscar Grant, Renisha McBride, Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin, among others. 

5/17: Modern civil rights

May 17, 2016


Happy April 1st! If you’re looking for fun and unique things to do over the weekend, we’ve mined a few suggestions with no tricks, just treats. 

In her world exhibition, "Women:New Portraits" Annie Leibovitz updates the photos from the book she published in 1999 with Susan Sontag, called "Women."

Over 25 years ago curators Alan Teller and Jerri Zbiral went to an estate sale in Illinois, and stumbled upon a shoebox that would change their lives.  

Peter Dobey

Alva Noë  is a professor of philosophy at UC Berkeley with a background in cognitive and brain science, so it makes sense that he writes about the nature of consciousness and human experience.

Philosophy Talk asks about Dance as a way of knowing

Oct 2, 2015

Is dance a form of perception? Is perception a form of dance?


http://sfprintcollective.com

When you walk around town, you’re sure to see large posters pasted to construction sites and the sides of buildings. Many are advertisements for movies, records, or cars. Occasionally, you’ll see a poster that isn’t selling anything: It may be there to rally people for a demonstration or make a point about affordable health care. But no matter what the intentions of the poster are, these pieces of public art draw mixed reviews from political artists, store-owners, and city workers. 

The Art & Queerness of Burning Man

Aug 20, 2015

Why do tens of thousands of people trek to a temporary camp city in a remote Nevada desert every August? Is Burning Man worth the heat and dust storms? What's queer about it? On Thursday's Out in the Bay (7pm PDT 8/20) Eric Jansen's guests are Jennifer Raiser and Sidney Erthal, writer and photographer, respectively, of the book Burning Man: Art on Fire; and Foxy, past mayor of Camp Beaverton, the main lesbian camp in Burning Man's "gayborhood." (This interview first broadcast Aug. 14, 2014)

Poet laureates reign across the country, representing different cities and states like kings and queens of the written word. Often, they’re college professors with knee-deep resumes. Not so in Oakland, where being a professor would actually disqualify you: Oakland’s poet laureate has always been a high school student. 

 

 

LGBTQ rights made huge strides recently with the supreme court’s historic decision on same-sex marriage. But an ongoing situation in San Francisco’s Mission District shows that there’s still pushback, even in the most liberal of cities.

 

Ask artist Favianna Rodriguez to describe the food she grew up eating in Oakland’s Fruitvale district, and her response is akin to poetry.

“It’s two tortillas,” she says. “They’re soaked in a little bit of grease ... you have some carne asada and you just bite into them and you can taste the simplicity of a good taco.”

Colin Peden

Punk rock started as a kind of music for people who didn’t fit in. San Francisco, a city that has long been a place for outsiders to make their own communities, was one of the centers of this movement.

San Francisco was also on the forefront when it came to women joining the punk scene.  Enter Penelope Houston. In 1976, she and some friends started one of the most influential San Francisco punk bands ever—The Avengers.

San Francisco native and graphic journalist Wendy MacNaughton set out to uncover the city's hidden stories in her book, Meanwhile in San Francisco. It’s a collection of drawn portraits of San Francisco residents and their favorite hangouts, including written observations from interviews. 

Provincetown Tourism Office

  

How did Provincetown, Massachusetts, get to be so "gay, gay, gay," as the Provincetown Business Guild puts it? Let the locals fill you in! 7pm Thursday, hear from the lounge pianist who's been there 50 years, The Fabulous Dyketones founder, the activist-artist who made a dress out of tampon applicators, the town clerk who married 200 couples in one day, and more. You'll hear about Portuguese sailors and innkeepers, fine art history, sand-filled cars, mass same-sex weddings in 2004, the dunes, "the dick dock" and more on this documentary-style romp with Out in the Bay host Eric Jansen, edited by Nora Elmeligy, through what is probably the gayest little city in the world - at least per capita! Airs 7pm Thursday April 16, 2015. 

StoryCorps: Two artists fall in love

Apr 2, 2015

Jena McRae, a dancer with the Embodiment Project, first met David "Dublin" Schwirtz, a vocalist with the Shotgun Wedding Quintet, during a rehearsal at the Treat Street Social Club. They sat down with StoryCorps and shared a few highlights of how their relationship evolved over time, into love.

Daily news roundup for Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Apr 2, 2015
Daniel Mondragón / Mission Local

Here's what's happening in the Bay Area, as curated by KALW news:

California Drought: Governor Orders First-Ever Water Restrictions // SFist 

  

 

 

On the December 9th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we're discussing creative responses to displacement. Median rent in San Francisco is over $3,000 a month. The city is now one of the most unequal urban areas in the country. Many long-term renters have been evicted. From 2000 to 2010, San Francisco’s black population dropped by 19 percent. What place does art have in the fight against gentrification? It's Your Call, with Rose Aguilar, and you.

 Guests:

Unlike apartments, businesses and non-profits in San Francisco don’t have rent protection. This year more than 4,000 businesses will be forced to close or relocate in the city.

Sukey Lewis

We all throw stuff away—about four and a half pounds of garbage a day, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

We’ve gotten used to hearing the three commandments of waste management: recycle, reduce, and reuse. But recently, the term “up-cycle” has come into vogue. That’s the idea that you can take waste materials and turn them into something valuable and even beautiful.

Mosaic artist Daud Abdullah up-cycles pieces of trashed pottery, tile, mirror, and glass to make public art on garbage cans in Oakland and Richmond.

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