art

Sukey Lewis

We all throw stuff away—about four and a half pounds of garbage a day, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

We’ve gotten used to hearing the three commandments of waste management: recycle, reduce, and reuse. But recently, the term “up-cycle” has come into vogue. That’s the idea that you can take waste materials and turn them into something valuable and even beautiful.

Mosaic artist Daud Abdullah up-cycles pieces of trashed pottery, tile, mirror, and glass to make public art on garbage cans in Oakland and Richmond.

This story is set to the music of Bay Area shakuhachi player Masayuki Koga, who runs the Japanese Music Institute of America. It’s from an album called Eastwind. All poetry in this piece can be found in the book Tamalpais Walking, by Tom Killion and Gary Snyder.

Remixing Reality on Philosophy Talk

Aug 16, 2014

For decades, literary critics have been questioning the relevance of the novel as a literary form, with some going so far as to declare its death. But if the novel is dead, it’s not clear what new form can take its place. Should we treat the popularity of the memoir as a sign that what readers want is more truth, less fiction? Or is the memoir, like ‘reality TV,’ mostly just fiction dressed up as fact? In these fragmented times, when everything has already been said or done before, can there be any truly original innovations in art and literature?

The Art & Queerness of Burning Man

Aug 14, 2014

  

Why do tens of thousands of people trek to a temporary camp city in a remote Nevada desert every August? Is Burning Man worth the heat and dust storms? What's queer about it? On Thursday's Out in the Bay (7pm 8/14) Eric Jansen's guests are Jennifer Raiser and Sidney Erthal, writer and photographer, respectively, of the book Burning Man: Art on Fire; and Foxy, past mayor of Camp Beaverton, the main lesbian camp in Burning Man's "gayborhood."

Rhian Miller

I’m sitting at a table with Walter Kresnik and Quintin Rodriguez. They’re bent over big sheets of paper with pencils and markers and paint, drawing hearts.

  

 

 

On the July 24th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll talk about a recent report that found that 76 percent of public grant money in San Francisco goes towards arts programs with primarily white audiences, even as people of color make up over half of the city's population. What’s the right way to decide who gets public money for the arts? Do the criteria need to change to ensure that the broadest public is served? It's Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.

Guests: 

Philosophy Talk asks: Is it Art... or mere Obscenity?

Jun 12, 2014

What do Marcel Duchamp, Damien Hirst, and Andres Serrano have in common? They’ve all created modern works of art that have shocked and outraged the general public, causing many to question whether these works have any artistic value at all. But isn’t it the purpose of art to incite inquiry and question conventional moral wisdom? If so, then a strong public reaction would seem to prove the artistic merit of these works. So, is there a clear line to be drawn between genuine art and mere obscenity? Or has shock value simply replaced cultural value in the world of contemporary art?

  

Giant Robot at OCMA

It used to be that the terms “nerdy” and “cool” were at opposite ends of a spectrum. Collecting comics was for losers, listening to punk rock was for cool kids. But these days, there’s a kind of intersection of hipness and geekiness-- from the high-tech devices in our pockets to the sci-fi and comic-inspired entertainment we consume, “cool nerd” culture is really having its day. But back in the mid-90s, there was a magazine that was already bridging that gap: Giant Robot, which brought together video games, collecting, music, and art with a uniquely Asian American perspective.

Youth Radio: Ballet is a sport too

Apr 30, 2014

From our partners at Youth Radio.

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