art

Remixing Reality on Philosophy Talk

Aug 16, 2014

For decades, literary critics have been questioning the relevance of the novel as a literary form, with some going so far as to declare its death. But if the novel is dead, it’s not clear what new form can take its place. Should we treat the popularity of the memoir as a sign that what readers want is more truth, less fiction? Or is the memoir, like ‘reality TV,’ mostly just fiction dressed up as fact? In these fragmented times, when everything has already been said or done before, can there be any truly original innovations in art and literature?

Rhian Miller

I’m sitting at a table with Walter Kresnik and Quintin Rodriguez. They’re bent over big sheets of paper with pencils and markers and paint, drawing hearts.

  

 

 

On the July 24th, 2014 edition of Your Call, we'll talk about a recent report that found that 76 percent of public grant money in San Francisco goes towards arts programs with primarily white audiences, even as people of color make up over half of the city's population. What’s the right way to decide who gets public money for the arts? Do the criteria need to change to ensure that the broadest public is served? It's Your Call, with Hana Baba, and you.

Guests: 

Philosophy Talk asks: Is it Art... or mere Obscenity?

Jun 12, 2014

What do Marcel Duchamp, Damien Hirst, and Andres Serrano have in common? They’ve all created modern works of art that have shocked and outraged the general public, causing many to question whether these works have any artistic value at all. But isn’t it the purpose of art to incite inquiry and question conventional moral wisdom? If so, then a strong public reaction would seem to prove the artistic merit of these works. So, is there a clear line to be drawn between genuine art and mere obscenity? Or has shock value simply replaced cultural value in the world of contemporary art?

  

Giant Robot at OCMA

It used to be that the terms “nerdy” and “cool” were at opposite ends of a spectrum. Collecting comics was for losers, listening to punk rock was for cool kids. But these days, there’s a kind of intersection of hipness and geekiness-- from the high-tech devices in our pockets to the sci-fi and comic-inspired entertainment we consume, “cool nerd” culture is really having its day. But back in the mid-90s, there was a magazine that was already bridging that gap: Giant Robot, which brought together video games, collecting, music, and art with a uniquely Asian American perspective.

Youth Radio: Ballet is a sport too

Apr 30, 2014

From our partners at Youth Radio.

Philosophy Talk is back at The Marsh Theater in Berkeley on Sunday April 13 for the next two live recordings in our 2013-14 season.

Academy of Art, SF


Sophia Sattar was born in Karachi, Pakistan to an Indian mother and Pakistani father who were both doctors, and she loved to paint. But, living in a world where you were groomed from childhood to become a doctor or an engineer, being an artist was out of the question.

http://www.oakarts.org/

In 2002, Oakland Mayor, now governor, Jerry Brown started Oakland School for the Arts (OSA) with the hope that students would have an outlet to express themselves through art forms like dance, theater, and visual illustrations.

I don't know about you, but I'm feeling experimental. My arms and ears are open to what the universe has to offer, and luckily this weekend, the Bay Area is brimming with new options: from sounds by young producers, to a vast selection of fresh tastes on the world's most popular, brewed beverage. Let's go adventuring this Arts/Culture/Weekend!

Tim Anderson, Bay Area DIY superhero

Nov 19, 2012

There’s a sprawling industrial park on the waterfront in Alameda that once was a Navy air base. What had been the base's air traffic control tower was taken over by a gaggle of MIT engineers working on a variety of high-tech projects. One is an airborne wind turbine, being developed by a company called Makani Power. Tim Anderson refers to himself as Makani's pro bono night watchman. He feels strongly America needs to get off petroleum, and he has other ideas about other changes this country should make.

Lorenzo Bynum has the “baller" build you might see on the cover of GQ, without the swagger. He’s clean-cut, 5’10”, wears two small earrings and has a muscular frame. It’s a Wednesday afternoon in Marin City, and the 23-year-old is digging frantically through a 10’ by 10’ closet. He’s hunting for a parachute large enough for a game with 15 third graders.

Wednesdays are busy days for Bynum. He clocks in at three part-time jobs: two hours directing elementary school children, two hours coaching track and field, and two hours coaching middle school boys basketball.

 

On today's Your Call, we’ll talk about the power of images to incite social change.  An exhibit at the Oakland Museum of California “All of Us or None” explores the history of social justice posters in the Bay Area.  From Shepherd Fairey’s Obama poster to the Occupy movement’s Guy Fawkes mask--how can a popular image become a rallying symbol?  Join us at 10 or email feedback@yourcallradio.org.  What art has motivated you to become active? It’s Your Call with Holly Kernan, and you.

Guests:

Lenora Lee, a native San Franciscan dancer and choreographer, makes large-scale interdisciplinary work that tells the stories of Asians in America – stories that she says aren’t represented in the mainstream media or in art. And her latest piece, "Reflections," is a response to what Lee says she witnessed as a Chinese American growing up in San Francisco.

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